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Puppet: A Retelling of Pinocchio
     

Puppet: A Retelling of Pinocchio

4.0 3
by Pauline C. Harris
 
In this science fiction retelling of Pinocchio, sixteen-year old Penelope agrees to be transformed into a living, mechanical marionette, enhanced with superhuman abilities. As Penelope and her scientist "creator" parade throughout the country, she's soon deemed a threat and monitored for the nation's safety. In one last attempt to secure her freedom by making her

Overview

In this science fiction retelling of Pinocchio, sixteen-year old Penelope agrees to be transformed into a living, mechanical marionette, enhanced with superhuman abilities. As Penelope and her scientist "creator" parade throughout the country, she's soon deemed a threat and monitored for the nation's safety. In one last attempt to secure her freedom by making her appear harmless, Penelope's creator takes something away from her - the ability to lie.
But as Penelope faces obstacles bigger than herself, battles a governmental uprising, and meets the first person who's ever truly made her feel loved, she's afraid she might lose it all. Because in a world where nothing is true and guarding her heart is her only chance at life, how can she survive without telling a lie?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781927940143
Publisher:
Patchwork Press
Publication date:
10/18/2014
Pages:
246
Sales rank:
1,221,842
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.56(d)

Meet the Author

Pauline C. Harris is the author of middle grade and young adult science fiction novels and published her first book at the age of fourteen. She's currently working toward a degree in English. Other than writing, her time is consumed mainly by reading, playing the violin, watching old black and white movies, and trying to survive her college classes.

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Puppet: A Retelling of Pinocchio 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
MyndiL More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this retelling of the classic Pinnochio tale. Not only was the "puppet" a female in this telling, but the story did some other opposites as well. I also enjoyed the aspect of science and religious themes introduced to the story. There was also a touch of a YA romance that wasn't enough to overshadow the main idea of the story, but just enough to add a sweet touch. Throughout the tale, Penelope "Pen" has to deal with fear from things she's done that she regrets, hope in finding someone to care about her anyway, stress of trying to impress and help someone else fulfill their dreams, betrayal from one she thought loved her, and anger at having her choices taken away. It's a story that will definitely take you through a range of emotions and keep you turning the pages.
224perweek More than 1 year ago
This was a really good story. Kept me turning the pages. Very steady paced book. No real highs or lows. Love the cover artwork.
Anna More than 1 year ago
I was asked by the author to give an honest review: I would give this book a 3.5 out of 5. This book would go more toward the middle grade genre and I would recommend it to fans of Cress. It's a retelling of Pinocchio, a 16 year old orphan is adopted by a scientist who tries to create a living marionette who also can not lie. The author does a great job at creating the dialogue and characters, but the setting lacked. I didn't really see the world that they lived in, but I tried to imagine it as steampunk-esque. There were a few grammatical/spelling mistakes that the editor missed which pulled me out of the book, but it was a very quick and easy read (not my normal taste, but I was still entertained). The relationship between James and Pen made me uncomfortable. She's supposed to be his foster sister but they had a small romance between them. I feel like the author shouldn't have played that up as much (would work well in middle grade without it.) The religious background was actually interesting. At first I thought I was imagining it, but then God/religion started to be trusteed upon us (this may help or hurt your audience). For me, I liked it because it fit in the theme of right vs wrong and if it's okay to lie sometimes. My favorite part was toward the end where Pen wonders if she'll be forgiven by God for the bad things she has done (Yes, Pen! As long as you ask for forgiveness!) I'd recommend this book to the ages of 10-14, this would be a good transition from genre to genre for younger kids. See more reviews on my youtube channel. www.youtube.combreannamouncereadsandreviews