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Pure (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)
     

Pure (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

4.2 124
by Julianna Baggott, BookSource Staff (Compiler)
 

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We know you are here, our brothers and sisters . . .
Pressia barely remembers the Detonations or much about life during the Before. In her sleeping cabinet behind the rubble of an old barbershop where she lives with her grandfather, she thinks about what is lost-how the world went from amusement parks, movie theaters, birthday parties, fathers and mothers . . . to

Overview

We know you are here, our brothers and sisters . . .
Pressia barely remembers the Detonations or much about life during the Before. In her sleeping cabinet behind the rubble of an old barbershop where she lives with her grandfather, she thinks about what is lost-how the world went from amusement parks, movie theaters, birthday parties, fathers and mothers . . . to ash and dust, scars, permanent burns, and fused, damaged bodies. And now, at an age when everyone is required to turn themselves over to the militia to either be trained as a soldier or, if they are too damaged and weak, to be used as live targets, Pressia can no longer pretend to be small. Pressia is on the run.

Burn a Pure and Breathe the Ash . . .
There are those who escaped the apocalypse unmarked. Pures. They are tucked safely inside the Dome that protects their healthy, superior bodies. Yet Partridge, whose father is one of the most influential men in the Dome, feels isolated and lonely. Different. He thinks about loss-maybe just because his family is broken; his father is emotionally distant; his brother killed himself; and his mother never made it inside their shelter. Or maybe it's his claustrophobia: his feeling that this Dome has become a swaddling of intensely rigid order. So when a slipped phrase suggests his mother might still be alive, Partridge risks his life to leave the Dome to find her.

When Pressia meets Partridge, their worlds shatter all over again.

Editorial Reviews

Clare Clark
This is an apocalypse for a generation on the cusp of adulthood, who must choose between the authoritarian Dome, where safety comes at the price of parental tyranny, and the dark and dangerous wastelands of the world beyond, where, in pursuit of their freedom, they must face their greatest fears…This is a post�apocalyptic narrative that owes at least as much to fairy tale and myth as it does to science fiction. The result is an old-fashioned adventure story that zips along at a brisk pace, the Mad Max landscape creating the backdrop for a succession of violent confrontations in which the stakes are satisfyingly high. What lifts Pure from the glut of blood-spattered young adult fiction is not the story Baggott tells but the exquisite precision of her prose.
—The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly
Baggott’s highly anticipated postapocalyptic horror novel, a dramatic shift from her lighthearted poetry, women’s fiction (as Bridget Asher), and children’s books, is a fascinating mix of stark, oppressive authoritarianism and grotesque anarchy. Like most survivors of the Detonations, teen Pressia is disfigured, a doll’s head fused into the place where her hand should be. She’s better off than people who were merged into each other, with animals, or even with the Earth itself, but she’s also at risk of being drafted into the paramilitary Operation Sacred Revolution. The few who survived unscathed—known as “Pures”—live in the Domes, impenetrable arcologies where the few children are forced into rigid training and genetic enhancement. When Partridge, believing his mother to be alive in the wilderness, escapes from a Dome, he’s rescued by Pressia. Along with a conspiracy theorist named Bradwell, they gradually discover dark secrets about events on both sides of the Dome walls. Baggott mixes brutality, occasional wry humor, and strong dialogue into an exemplar of the subgenre. Agent: Sobel Weber Associates. (Feb.)
The New York Times Sunday Book Review
"What lifts PURE from the glut of blood-spattered young adult fiction is not the story Baggott tells but the exquisite precision of her prose...discomfiting and unforgettable."
Library Journal
The author of fiction, poetry, and children's books, Baggott here offers the first in a postapocalyptic trilogy being compared to Justin Cronin's The Passage and Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games. After the Detonations, the burned and scarred survivors must turn themselves over to the authorities at age 16, to become either soldiers or live targets. Now 16 and (understandably) on the run, Pressia encounters Partridge, one of the Pures—so-called because they were inside the Dome during the Detonations and hence are undamaged. Partridge has just left the Dome's safety, having learned that his mother might be outside, still alive. This book is really building (film rights went to the Twilight producers); don't miss.
Kirkus Reviews
Us 99 percenters will live outside the gates come the future, and it won't be pretty--especially once the nukes start popping. Baggott (Girl Talk, 2001, etc.), author of fantasies and light comedies alike, takes a somber turn with her latest, which opens with an exceedingly ugly period "after the Detonations," a time when some people sicken and die from merely drinking the water and others' faces simply melt away, where "death is sometimes measured" in the rasping coughs of the survivors who have breathed the nuclear winter. Tucked inside the safety of the Dome, where a privileged few are sheltered, young Partridge is safe. Impudently, though, he steals out into that world to find his mother, or at least find out why she refused to leave the city and take cover with her family. Out there, 16-year-old Pressia is trying to keep out of the clutches of the ugly fascist order that has come into power in a time of emergency. It's a nasty bunch, given to playing games such as Death Spree, "used...to rid society of the weak," as one of the impromptu band of resisters formed by Pressia and Partridge says, adding, "It's really the only kind of sport around here, if you can call it a sport." That band roams the countryside, gathering knowledge and skills, dodging the many, many baddies and bad circumstances that threaten to do them in, making a fine hero quest among the ruins wrought by both bombs and "the Return to Civility and its legislation." Read between the lines, and the story acquires timely dimensions, though you need not do so to have good fun with the book. As fantasy novels tend to do, Baggott's tome labors under heavy influences--not just Tolkien, the lord of the genre, but also Rowling, comparisons with whom are inevitable. William Golding's and George Orwell's and even H.G. Wells' spirits hove into view from time to time, too. Yet Baggott is no mimic, and she successfully imagines and populates a whole world, which is the most rigorous test of a fantasy's success. It's a bonus that the hero of the piece is a young girl, which ought to serve as inspiration for more than a few readers. Whether Baggott's imagined world is one that you'd want to live in is another matter entirely, of course. Damned Detonations!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780606266802
Publisher:
Demco Media
Publication date:
09/30/2012
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
466
Product dimensions:
4.80(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.50(d)
Lexile:
680L (what's this?)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

What People are Saying About This

Jeff VanderMeer
Original and masterfully written, Pure features great characters and a story that is, from page to page, startling, harrowing, and touching. I recommend it wholeheartedly. (Jeff VanderMeer, World Fantasy Award winner and bestselling author of City Of Saints And Madmen)
Steven Schneider
Pure is a post-apocalyptic thrill ride, filled with wildly inventive characters whose journey of struggle and revolution manifests as a fast-paced narrative full of promise and hope. As visceral and kinetic as it is socially relevant, Pure is bursting with imagination and epic adventure. Baggott is here to stay. And we are all the beneficiaries. (Steven Schneider, producer of major motion pictures Paranormal Activity I and II)
Justin Cronin
A great gorgeous whirlwind of a novel, boundless in its imagination. You will be swept away. (Justin Cronin, New York Times bestselling author of The Passage)
Aimee Bender
A boiling and roiling glorious mosh-pit of a book, full of wonderful weirdness, tenderness, and wild suspense. If Katniss could jump out of her own book and pick a great friend, I think she'd find an excellent candidate in Pressia. (Aimee Bender, author of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake)
Robert Olen Butler
This new novel of Julianna Baggott's is so bizarre and wonderful and transportingly self-contained and yet so resonantly rich that I truly forgot where I was or who I was. . . . I was profoundly enchanted. . . . Pure is not just the most extraordinary coming-of-age novel I've ever read, it is also a beautiful and savage metaphorical assessment of how all of us live in this present age. This is an important book, for adults young and old, by one of our finest writers. (Robert Olen Butler, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of A Good Scent From A Strange Mountain)
Danielle Trussoni
Pure is a dark adventure that is both startling and addictive at once. Pressia Belze is one part manga heroine and one part post-apocalyptic Alice, stranded in a surreal Wonderland where everyone and everything resonates with what has been lost. Breathtaking and frightening. I couldn't stop reading Pure. (Danielle Trussoni, bestselling author of Angelology)
William Giraldi
Julianna Baggott's Pure is testament to the might and beauty of Grimm-dark imagination. The devils of the human psyche will not be quelled, and this book, like the best of Poe, intrepidly confronts what our bad clan is capable of, the fragility of all human feeling, and the possibility that hope can redeem the wastelands we've made. A sublime novel by one of our most important storytellers. (William Giraldi, author of Busy Monsters)
Matt Bondurant
Julianna Baggott has created a mesmerizing, nightmarish apocalyptic world, populated by denizens who suffer out bleak existence bearing the literal marks of what was closest to them in their previous life. The story that emerges from the ashes shines like a jewel on a dark horizon, and this tale about family, the power of faith, and the search for love is sure to haunt the imagination of readers for a long, long time. (Matt Bondurant, author of The Wettest County in the World)

Meet the Author

JULIANNA BAGGOTT is the author of many books including national bestseller Girl Talk. Her work has appeared in dozens of publications, including The New York Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Best American Poetry 2000, 180 More Extraordinary Poems for Everyday (ed. Billy Collins), The Southern Review, TriQuarterly, Virginia Quarterly Review, Poetry, Glamour, Ms. Magazine, and read on NPR's Talk of the Nation. And her books have received critical acclaim from reviewers and fellow authors alike.

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Pure 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 124 reviews.
Amabe421 More than 1 year ago
As a dystopian lover I was really excited to read this book. It's a dytopian that takes place post-apocalypse. This book is fabulously written. It's intense, dark, and a bit unsettling. The descriptiveness of the environment and characters is amazing. Just think, humans and animals that are fused with items that they were near when the detonation happened. People with glass, metal, plastic, and other things embedded in their skin. Others with living animals attached to them, or other people fused on their backs, arms, or legs. Totally creepy and disturbing right? There are also creatures that live out in the dirt and rocks. They are vicious and mean. Then there are the Pures who were safely in the Dome when the detonation happened and they are untouched and living in a controlled environment, pretty oblivious to what is really going on with the survivors outside the Dome. They are told that outside the Dome the "wretches" are violent. They are like two separate worlds, neither really knows the truth about the other. I will admit that I had a little bit of a hard time getting into it initially, but after a few chapters I couldn't stop reading! The story goes back and forth from Pressia, and Partridge at first. Pressia being a survivor on the outside, and Partridge a Pure. I really liked both characters a lot. Partridge is a very determined and strong character, especially since he has been living relatively cushy and nice inside the Dome. Pressia is tough and strong because she has to be. That is how you survive outside the Dome. Then add in a few other character PoV's, like Lydia, and El Capitan. Lydia is really just an innocent bystander, but she is really smart and eventually has a bigger part in the story. All of them have their own thing going on and we get to know the story from a lot of different angles. I don't even really now what to say about this book. It really is hard to explain. It has mystery, suspense, and is quite disturbing, but not in a bad way. We find out some interesting things about the Dome and the characters. This is a wonderful dystopian that takes it to a whole other level. It pushes further than just a government controlled world. It was a pretty long book, and it started off slow, but overall I really enjoyed it. It has some cringe worthy stuff in it, so keep in mind that this is not a light read at all. It is exactly the opposite. I really felt like I needed a pick me up after this book. It took my mind to a dark, and disturbed place that I had to shake off when I was done. This was a pretty twisted, but great post-apocalyptic dystopian that is worth reading!
C_Whitworth More than 1 year ago
In PURE, Julianna Baggott concocted a surreal riddle for her readers to unravel. She has created dual worlds—outside and inside the Dome—and an unforgettable cast of characters—Pressia and Partridge, Lyda and El Capitan—each with his/her own motive and mission, each struggling to discover what it means to be alive after the Detonations. This is a novel of many layers: a speculative account of a not-too-far-fetched future; a story of love and betrayal; a dark postapocalyptic novel with elements of fantasy and science fiction; a tale of family dissolution and reconciliation; a coming-of-age story in a world where actually coming of age can get you killed. When I received the ARC of this novel, I began reading it about 9 pm on a Friday night. By sunrise I had finished the novel. That was the first novel—since Nabokov’s Lolita, actually—that I’ve read straight through the night to the last page. Honestly, I’ll recommend this to everyone—from my nephews and nieces to my grandmother—in the coming weeks. It has that broad of an appeal. Outside the Dome, you’ll find the Deadlands and Meltland, a world whose sky is clotted with ash, where the OSR, a mysterious security force that patrols the streets, snatches miscreants from alleys and bedrooms and barbershops. You’ll meet some strange characters—Wretches—people scarred from the Detonations, some who no longer even looked human, some missing arms and legs, some with extra arms and legs, and extra heads, too. Their bodies are fused with bits of machinery, and with the playthings of children, and with the children themselves. But they are still human. Within the safety of the Dome—the dystopian, insular society cut off from the outside world—you’ll find Pures who breathe filtered air and learn filtered history lessons. The Dome is as scary as it is sterile. I won’t say whether I’d rather live inside or outside the Dome. I will, however, say that I’m looking forward to my next jaunt into this world of Baggott’s imagination.
ShannonODonnell More than 1 year ago
PURE is one of the most original, uncomfortably creepy, and engrossing dystopian novels I've read in a long time. I haven't read a book this intense since ASHES by Ilsa J. Bick. In fact, I'm not even sure how to review it, because I don't really know how to explain it. The world of Pure is ugly and grim, except for those who live in The Dome, where life is preserved and regulated. Those outside the dome are often horribly disfigured, fused with parts of the world around them: metal, glass, animals, other humans...anything they were near or touching when "the detonations" came. I can't possibly describe it effectively, but Julianna does it brilliantly. The best thing about this story, even though I am completely drawn in by the world and all its strangeness, is the characters. They are multi-dimensional and complex and PERFECT. I can't believe how complicated their relationships were, how inter-woven they became. I can't even choose a favorite. I loved them. I worried about them. I cheered and cried for them. I can't wait to learn more about them in the next book. If you are a fan of dystopian, you simply MUST read this book.
sarasugar More than 1 year ago
I loved this because when it says that Partridge and Pressia's worlds collide when they meet each other I assumed there was going to be romance. I kept waiting for the love triangle to develop with Bradwell, and it didn't :) refreshing. I loved this book for many other reasons, but this was the big one.
ValerieStuckInBooks More than 1 year ago
My Summary: The before was years ago. Pressia can't be sure if the memories she has of the before are her own or the combination of others memories she's heard. She knows the now very well. The death spree, the fused bodies, the lack of food, and the requirement that she turn herself in when she turns sixteen. There's no point, of course. If she does, they will kill her as a live target. So she might as well run. Partridge remembers the before well. He remembers his mother taking him to the beach and the song she sings to him. But that was before and now his mother is gone - lost outside the Dome trying to save others. But when a comment makes him think she may be still alive, he must find her. But how? Once Partridge meets Pressia everything changes. My Thoughts: 4 stars - a great read This book is a puzzle - a masterful puzzle. Nothing is as it seems. What it seems is very disturbing. A dystopia society that is far worse then most I've read, this book creates an incredible class war between those who were protected and those who have suffered through the devastation. The characters are strong and emotionally compelling. The story is twisting and turning. I became friends with Pressia and Partridge. On opposite sides of the class war, they are real and caring despite the cruelty all around them. I found myself routing for them and hoping that they would be successful even as I wondered what success would look like. Who should they trust? Is there a master plan being followed? It's the kind of story where you can look for the clues and piece them together. I like those kind of stories. I like to discover the truth of it and this one was one surprise after another. Nice. If dystopia is your genre, then this is a must read. If you like a little mystery though in, then this is a must read. A masterfully brilliant story that will have you turning the pages quickly to figure out what is really going on.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Alice D. for Readers Favorite Pressia Belze lives with her grandfather in the back room of a barbershop which was reduced to rubble in the aftermath of the Detonation, the bombing apocalypse that destroyed everything in the world. Now there is just destruction and dust where once families lived happily together. Pressia, like everyone who survived, is maimed for life, her doll's head now permanently affixed to her hand. She admires Bradwell, another teenage survivor, who has three fluttering, live birds stuck permanently to his back as a result of the Detonation. Pressia and Bradwell meet up with Patridge, one of the lucky ones called Pure who live safely in a gigantic Dome that protects them from the catastrophic world that Pressia and Bradwell call home. Partridge doesn't see himself as lucky and has escaped the safety of the Dome where his father is one of the men in charge. He seeks his mother who he knows helped many people during the Detonation. Lyda, Partridge's girlfriend inside the Dome, joins their adventures as she, Partridge, Pressia and Bradwell join up with El Captain and his brother Helmud to fight off the bad guys and find the truth of what really happened on that day when the earth was ravished. "Pure" is a fascinating young adult science fiction story that will captivate many readers. Its storyline is complex but totally understandable and the plot flows smoothly to the story's conclusion which promises more. "Pure" is the first book in a trilogy. The characters of Pressia, Bradwell, Partridge, Lyda, El Captain, and even bad guy Ingership are well-delineated and believable. "Pure" is a pure delight to read.
cubicleblindnessKM More than 1 year ago
I heard this book was being advertised as an adult book. But I have seen many Young Adult bloggers picking it up with some crossover appeal. In finishing the story I felt it was no different than most of the dystopian books in the YA market today and that if you enjoyed The Hunger Games, Divergent, Ashfall or Dark Inside you may like this story as well. It's dark, it's intense and it's freaky. Deformed people living in horrendous situations in a world that's been almost completely destroyed by the "detonations" and I am not just talking about the "wretches" that live outside the dome. Those that live within the dome are not in the utopian state that the others believe. Although like most people in this world I would choose to live in the dome than outside without a second thought. The story is told from several perspectives, mostly Partridge and Pressia but as the story progresses we get to jump a round a little into others perspectives as well. Every character has their place, there are no huge info dumps and the pace and intensity of the novel is a constant level of fear and the unknown. A continuing idea throughout the book was, looking for beauty in the small things. From a trinket in the dirt, to the rare and welcomed smile on a face, or the nicety of trading just a little more food than what was agreed upon, just because. This is by far one of my favorite reads this year. As I stated above this was one I chose to listen to the audiobook and still all this emotion and intensity comes through, maybe even more clear in the emotions of the narrators. I think it was put together very well and I recommend that if you enjoy audiobooks that this is one you listen to. I fully intend on buying myself a physical copy as soon as possible. It's a fantastic cover, that fits this story perfectly and an addition to my collection I'd be happy to own.
iheartyabooks More than 1 year ago
Pure is a creepy, fantastic Dystopia. Julianna Baggott built an incredibly dark dystopia world with the Pure and Wretches. Baggott definitely gave me spine-tingling chills with the mutations of the Wretches. I also loved the characters, Pressia, Partridge, Bradwell and Lyda, with the story being told through the main character's, Pressia and Partidge, POV, but there were also a few chapters told through Lyda and El Capitan’s POV. Julianna Baggott is a very talented, descriptive writer. I had no problem visualizing the horrible mutations and this dark dystopia world. Pressia is a Wretche, and she just turned sixteen and is supposed to surrender to the OSR, but she chooses to run, instead. The only one she can think of to help her is Bradwell. Bradwell is a conspiracy theorist who has his own ideas about the Detonation that destroyed the world. Pressia doesn't care about Bradwell's theory, she just wants his help to keep her safe from the OSR. On her way to Bradwell, she finds Partridge, but Partridge is a Pure and Pure's live in the Dome and they never leave. Pressia is only interested in keeping herself alive, but she will have to help Partridge and Bradwell, trying to keep all of them alive. And his theory might not be theory, after all. Pure has two romances going on. One is between Pressia and Bradwell, and the other is Partridge and Lyda. But even though I love romance, I have to say I really enjoyed Bradwell and Partridge’s relationship. Bradwell had no problem showing Partridge (this Pure) the ways of how the Wretches live. No matter what kind of world guys live in, guys will be guys, and I loved these two together. Pure has a dark, amazing, and intriguing storyline that had Pressia, Partridge and Bradwell on mission to discover the truth about their world and their self with all the suspense, mystery, action and romance you could ask for. I highly recommend Pure as a must read. Just be ready for few eerie chills with this Dystopia.
ToReadPerchancetoDream More than 1 year ago
With all the post-apocalyptic/dystopian novels out, it's hard to find one that's unique in any way. Pure, by Julianna Baggott definitely fills the bill. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for letting me read it! One of the strongest features of this book - description - turns out to also be one of its weakest. The author writes in vivid detail, so it's easy to picture everything in your mind. This was great when she was describing the combinations of people and inanimate objects and/or animals. It takes a great imagination to come up with a heroine with a doll head for a hand. But sometimes the detail was just too much; the long paragraphs depicting the new world tended to drag on the storyline to me. Pure is a solid, entertaining post-apocalyptic tale that easily holds the reader's attention. It's suitable for teenagers and adults alike.
Swede_Mette More than 1 year ago
This was a very interesting novel—what I loved about it is that it’s very weird (perhaps that’s my Swedish side), dark, bloody and grotesque, while at the same time exciting and beautiful. The sci-fi elements are imaginative and amazing and graphic… when else do you meet the protagonist and she is horribly scarred and has a doll head fused to her hand? Pure was definitely a ride and very intriguing, the descriptions were beautifully written and detailed oriented. That said, there was almost too much description and it really affected the pace of the book. Secrets are revealed slowly, building a great amount of suspense, but we don’t find out a few important things, such as the status of this post apocalypse world… what is the time period? Why is there a Dome? There were some questions I had about the nuclear attack—granted it’s a very lofty scenario to create but some of these things distracted me while reading them, taking me out of the escape of the book. The descriptions and build up actually makes the plot hard to identify at times—I felt like the book didn’t even start until one of the characters wants to escape, and it’s quite a bit into the story. The author spent so much time setting the story and conflict up, it was a little anticlimactic overall. While there were some great plot twists, it felt suddenly like the plot was hurried and the ending was somewhat resolved and had an unfinished feeling. Overall, I enjoyed the writer’s descriptive writing, it’s very visually written, creating intense imagery. Yet it’s almost overloaded with the set up and descriptions, so it was a little harder to get through. I prefer a page turner.
BooksWithBite More than 1 year ago
WOW! This book completely surprised me with it great detailing of an apocalyptic world. I love dystopian books. I was so excited to dive into this book. It gave me exactly what I wanted and more. What really hooked me in this book is the world created in it. I love being taken out of my world and put into the world that author made. The way the world was describe, the emotions that flowed from page to page, left me the feeling of being in the characters shoes. Pure, gave me the moment of aweness where the whole world around me fell down and I fell into the pages of adventure. The secrets exposed in the book left me feeling exciting. I loved following the characters and being in the same position they are. As I read the book, the plot pacing is good. There are a few points in the story that for me slow down, but again Ms. Baggot built up the plot leading the reader further in to the world. For me, the best part of the book is the feeling of contentment in the end. I really enjoyed being in the world. That is the best part of reading. Leaving the real world and enjoying a great fantasy. Pure aims at the readers heart with adventure, action, and two people searching for answers. Pure delivers a well crafted apocalyptic world that's engaging in every twist and turn. I can't wait to read what the next book holds!
Anonymous 12 days ago
Book is great!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kept me spellbound.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Goldenfurproductions More than 1 year ago
MY THOUGHTS A few years ago, I picked up this book, read the first chapter, and just stopped. I have no idea why, I guess I wasn't in the mood, but I turned it back into the library, never intending to finish it. Fast forward to a few months ago and I see this book at a cheap book sale. Obviously, it's a sign from fate telling me that I need to read this book, so I took it home. And now I am quite happy that I picked it up again! This book is probably one of the oddest books I have ever read and I absolutely loved it! This book takes place almost a decade after the Detonations, the bombings that destroyed a majority of the world. Those who were outside during the Denotations, and survived, now live harsh lives and all have deformities. The bombings melded their flesh with other objects and, sometimes, other creatures. Pressia is one of those who lives on the outside. She lives with her grandfather and she has completely forgotten what life was before the Denotations and only has her grandfather's stories. But her 16th birthday is coming closer, meaning that the militia will take her from her home.  Then, there's the Dome. Few 'lucky ones' remain perfectly safe in the Dome. Partridge is one of the few living here and his father is a prominent figure in the Dome. Partridge soon begins to question his father and the Dome, especially when he finds out that his mother might still be alive. That she might be living outside the Dome. What is really interesting about this book is how complex and unique the world-building is. I mentioned how those outside the Dome have deformities earlier and this was a really weird factor about the book, but it was actually really great. Pressia has a doll's head as a head, her grandfather has a electric fan in his throat, there's a boy with birds in his back, and there's another person who has his own brother attached to his back. That's not even all of it. There are even Dusts, who melded with dirt or rubble and basically will kill anyone who will come across them. Another popular one is the Groupies, those who melded with other people. All of this sounds really weird, and it is, but it actually is easy to just consider it normal when reading this book! Also, the author does such a great job defining how dangerous and destroyed the world outside is!  This book also has alternating perspectives, not just Pressia and Partridge, This was actually very easy to follow and made the book so much more interesting! I also really liked all of the characters and got incredibly invented in all of them! As for romance, this is not a romance heavy book, but there are some ship-worthy couples! IN CONCLUSION This was a really great dystopian and so very unique!! I am so glad that I picked this book up again! If you want a very dark, odd, but amazing dystopian, then please read this. Meanwhile, I'll be reading the sequel!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book so much l rushed to get the rest of the series. What a fresh and intriging view of what could happen if the bombs dropped. Vivid background. Fleshed out main characters. A human interest, love story, survival and fantasy all in one. I am 60 years old and I couldn't put it down. I can't wait to get through the other two books, but will also be sad that the story will end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is what dystopian tales should be like. Gruesome and yet captivating, it kept me going. The characters are lovable and they all have power in their weaknesses.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great series
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Like it but why are we continuously pushed into reading a series? Ugh! Yet another book to wait for. My waiting is causing all these series' to meld. However, this story was fun and was one I didn't want to put down. Parts were occassionally perdictable . Will have to wait for book 2.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book and its sequel have everything I have always hoped for in a book but never find. It is so amazing I have re-read the whole thing twice and re-read my favorite POVs more times than i can remember. You have to give it a try
Anonymous More than 1 year ago