Pursuit

( 57 )

Overview

What was to be a grand adventure for Melissa MacGregor -- an escape from the wilds of her Scottish home into the whirl of the London social scene -- seems to pale before the promise in the passionate gaze of Lincoln Ross Burnett. Though they exchange but a few words before parting after a chance encounter on her grandfather's lands, Melissa instantly knows this bold stranger is her destiny, while Lincoln realizes his heart has been claimed forever and he will never be complete ...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)
$7.35
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$7.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (184) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $2.08   
  • Used (175) from $1.99   
The Pursuit

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$4.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

What was to be a grand adventure for Melissa MacGregor -- an escape from the wilds of her Scottish home into the whirl of the London social scene -- seems to pale before the promise in the passionate gaze of Lincoln Ross Burnett. Though they exchange but a few words before parting after a chance encounter on her grandfather's lands, Melissa instantly knows this bold stranger is her destiny, while Lincoln realizes his heart has been claimed forever and he will never be complete until Melissa MacGregor is his bride.

But there are serious obstacles impeding the well-smitten Viscount Cambury's pursuit of glorious romance: sixteen of them -- all big and brawny, six named Ian and all named MacFearson. The bane of Lincoln's youth, Melissa's stifling, disapproving uncles are now determined to rob him of his newfound happiness. Yet he is equally resolved to confront the peril -- and to pursue his exquisite obsession all the way to London. . . and to the ends of the earth, if necessary.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
This engaging sequel to Johanna Lindsey's popular Scottish historical romance, Say You Love Me, is a passionate adventure filled with action, humor, past tragedies, and romantic dilemmas. Lincoln Ross Burnett, Viscount Cambury, is visiting family in Scotland before beginning his search for a bride when he meets Melissa MacGregor. Coincidentally, the lovely young daughter of the MacGregor of Kregora Castle is preparing to leave her Highland home in search of a husband. Even before the delighted pair is reunited amid the glittering London Season, they're certain that they are meant for each other. But even destiny doesn't guarantee that everything, or even anything, about their courtship will go smoothly. In fact, a childhood dispute between Lincoln and his newfound beloved's 16 uncles is about to come between them, for the wild side of her family still think he's crazy, and he's equally convinced that they're a pack of savages. Having lost the best friend he ever had over this matter already, he isn't about to lose the woman he now adores as well. But it's soon clear the past is about to add some unexpected complications to the would-be bride and groom's plans for the future.
Publishers Weekly
Energetic and expansive, good-natured and lusty, with enough flouncy dresses and galloping steeds to equip a comic opera, the sequel to Say You Love Me should delight Lindsey's many fans. From the moment that Melissa MacGregor and Lincoln Burnett set eyes on each other, they know they must be together. There's just one little problem actually, 16 very big problems: Melissa's uncles, who remember Lincoln as an out-of-control kid when they were growing up in Scotland. (After losing his father in an accident when he was a little boy, Lincoln was sent away by his mother to live with an aunt and uncle in England, and his bitterness toward his mother has grown ever since.) The uncles' obsession with Melissa's safety is just the excuse the clan of six-footers needs to treat Lincoln with brutish incivility for instance, conniving to stow him on a slow boat to China. But love cannot be shanghaied in a Lindsey novel, at least not for long, especially when it has a heroine like the strong-willed Melissa. The lovers pass one test after another, in the drawing rooms of the London season and the rugged terrain of the Highlands, meanwhile sharing hot kisses and the requisite night during which nothing goes unsaid or undone. What makes Lindsey special is that all her characters, major and minor, seem thrilled to be in the story; they manage even to have fun while pining or punching. There are no villains, only flawed human beings, occasionally misdirected by their loving hearts. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
When Lincoln Ross Burnett sees Melissa MacFearson in his Scottish homeland, he knows she must become his wife. Lincoln had left Scotland as a boy after the death of his father and was raised by an uncle who bequeathed him a title, property, and wealth. But his memories of abandonment by his mother have left scars, and Lincoln will soon find that Melissa, though as smitten as he, has a crew of uncles who hold a grudge against him dating back to his boyhood. While the point of contention with Melissa's uncles may seem a bit unrealistic, the author defends it fairly well. Will Lincoln be able to overcome these obstacles in his pursuit of Melissa? Although listeners may guess the answer, getting there is enjoyable, aided by Michael Page's ability to handle both Scottish and British dialects. His portrayal of older women is sometimes a bit shrill, but his facility with the Scots speech gives a real sense of the Highlands; he gracefully manages the scenes of emotion and seduction. Recommended for fiction collections.-Melody A. Moxley, Rowan P.L., Salisbury, NC Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
A lighthearted romp about the effects of a childhood misunderstanding that became a major feud. When Lincoln, Viscount Cambury, meets Melissa, it is love at first sight for both of them. However, their courtship is complicated because 20 years earlier her 16 uncles had become Lincoln's enemies even though they were just children. Now, the fellows are smotheringly protective of their only niece, and the couple does not have much time together as the entourage moves back and forth between England and Scotland. Most of the characters speak in a Scottish dialect. The story moves quickly, sometimes predictably, but with a few more creative elements toward the end. Readers get to know Lincoln and Melissa as individuals as they interact with the other characters, but the uncles are not well differentiated, although they don't need to be-six of them are even named Ian. Give this to readers who need cheering up; many scenes could be described as slapstick.-Claudia Moore, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780380814800
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/5/2003
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 208,630
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Meet the Author

Johanna Lindsey is one of the most popular authors of romantic fiction, with over sixty million copies of her novels sold. World renowned for her novels of “first-rate romance” (New York Daily News), Lindsey is the author of forty-three previous bestselling novels, many of which have been #1 New York Times bestsellers. Lindsey lives in Maine with her family.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One



"You don't like your mother very much, d'you, m'boy?"

Lincoln Ross Burnett, seventeenth viscount Cambury, glanced curiously at his aunt sitting across from him in the plush coach that was climbing ever higher into the Highlands of Scotland. The question wasn't surprising, at least to him. Yet it was one that would simply be ignored -- if asked by anyone else.

His Aunt Henry -- only her husband and Lincoln had ever been permitted to call her Henry -- was a sweet, cherubic woman in her forty-fifth year. A bit scatterbrained, but that merely made her more adorable. She was short, pudgy, and had a round face surrounded by an arch of frizzy gold curls. Her daughter, Edith, was identical, just a younger version. Neither was classically pretty, but they grew on you; each had her own endearing qualities.

Lincoln loved them both. They were his family now, not the woman who had remained in the Highlands after she'd sent him off to live with his uncle in England nineteen years ago. He'd been only ten at the time, and had been devastated to have been ripped from the only home he'd known and sent to live among strangers.

But the Burnetts didn't remain strangers. From the beginning they treated him like a son, even though they had no children yet. Edith was born the year after his arrival, and they were told, unfortunately, that she would be their one and only. So it wasn't surprising that his Uncle Richard decided to make him his heir, even changing his name so that the Burnett name would be preserved along with the title.

Itshouldn't bother him any longer. He'd lived more years in England now than he had at his home in Scotland. He'd lost the Scottish burr years ago, and he fit so well into English society that most people he was acquainted with had no idea he'd been born in Scotland. They thought Ross was merely his middle name, rather than his original surname.

No, none of this should bother him a bit after all these years, but it bloody well did. He kept his bitterness firmly in hand, though -- at least he'd thought no one had detected it. Yet his aunt's question suggested she knew the truth.

Oddly, one of the things that Lincoln admired greatly in his aunt was that although she could bully with the best of them if it was a matter of health or welfare -- and he'd spent many an unnecessary extra day in his bed getting over a cold to prove it -- she didn't assert herself otherwise. If a matter was considered none of her business, she wouldn't try to make it her business. And how he felt about his mother was his business alone.

Nor was he inclined to own up to those feelings, and so he asked Henriette evasively, "What gives you that idea?"

"This brooding you've been doing since we left home isn't like you, and you've never been so tense -- nor so silent, I might add. You haven't said a word since Edith dozed off."

Thankfully, he had the perfect excuse. "I've had a lot on my mind since you announced Edith was going to have her come-out in the grand old style this season and volunteered me as her chaperone. I don't know the first bloody thing about chaperoning a young miss who's shopping for a husband."

"Nonsense, there's nothing complicated about it. And you did agree it's past time for you to do that shopping for yourself, since you've no one in particular in mind yet either. You should have already got your own family started. You've been tardy, which is fine for a man, but Edith can't afford to be. So you accomplish the same goal together. It's a brilliant plan, and you know it. You haven't changed your mind, have you?"

"No, but--"

"Well, then, we are back to my question, aren't we?" Henriette persisted.

"No, actually, I've answered that, and if not to your satisfaction, at least be assured there is nothing for you to be concerned about."

"Nonsense," she disagreed again. "Just because I haven't nagged you about the direction you choose for your life, doesn't mean I haven't been immeasurably concerned when you've trod down the wrong paths."

"Immeasurably?" He raised a brow, accompanied with a grin he couldn't hold back.

She humphed over his amusement. "You will not dillydally around the subject thinking you can avoid it this time."

He sighed. "Very well, what else has led to this amazing assumption that I don't like my mother?"

"Possibly because you haven't visited her in nineteen years?"

It had been ripping him up, the stark beauty of the view out the coach window. His mind hadn't been playing reminiscent tricks on him all these years. The Highlands of Scotland were as wild and magnificent as he remembered -- and he'd missed his homeland more than even he had realized, to go by the effect that seeing it again was having on him. But even that hadn't been enough to draw him back here sooner.

"There's been no need to visit her here, since she's visited England numerous times," he pointed out.

"And you managed to be busy elsewhere most of those times," she countered.

"Unavoidable circumstance," he maintained, though her expression said she wasn't buying that either.

"I'd say pulling teeth would be easier."

"The timing was never convenient."

"Faugh, none of your reasons ever washed. Excuses all. Goodness, don't think I've ever seen you blush, m'boy. Hit the mark, did I?"

His blush, of course, just deepened, now that it had been pointed out. The increased embarrassment turned his voice quite...

The Pursuit. Copyright © by Johanna Lindsey. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

0060599855<%FIRSTCHAPT%>Ilium

Chapter One

The Plains of Ilium

Rage.

Sing, O Muse, of the rage of Achilles, of Peleus' son, murderous, man-killer, fated to die, sing of the rage that cost the Achaeans so many good men and sent so many vital, hearty souls down to the dreary House of Death. And while you're at it, O Muse, sing of the rage of the gods themselves, so petulant and so powerful here on their new Olympos, and of the rage of the post-humans, dead and gone though they might be, and of the rage of those few true humans left, self-absorbed and useless though they may have become. While you are singing, O Muse, sing also of the rage of those thoughtful, sentient, serious but not-so-close-to-human beings out there dreaming under the ice of Europa, dying in the sulfur-ash of Io, and being born in the cold folds of Ganymede.

Oh, and sing of me, O Muse, poor born-again-against-his-will Hockenberry -- poor dead Thomas Hockenberry, Ph.D., Hockenbush to his friends, to friends long since turned to dust on a world long since left behind. Sing of my rage, yes, of my rage, O Muse, small and insignificant though that rage may be when measured against the anger of the immortal gods, or when compared to the wrath of the god-killer, Achilles.

On second thought, O Muse, sing of nothing to me. I know you. I have been bound and servant to you, O Muse, you incomparable bitch. And I do not trust you, O Muse. Not one little bit.

If I am to be the unwilling Chorus of this tale, then I can start the story anywhere I choose. I choose to start it here.

It is a day like every other day in the more than nine years since my rebirth. I awaken at the Scholia barracks, that place of red sand and blue sky and great stone faces, am summoned by the Muse, get sniffed and passed by the murderous cerberids, am duly carried the seventeen vertical miles to the grassy summits of Olympos via the high-speed east-slope crystal escalator and -- once reported in at the Muse's empty villa -- receive my briefing from the scholic going off-shift, don my morphing gear and impact armor, slide the taser baton into my belt, and then QT to the evening plains of Ilium.

If you've ever imagined the siege of Ilium, as I did professionally for more than twenty years, I have to tell you that your imagination almost certainly was not up to the task. Mine wasn't. The reality is far more wonderful and terrible than even the blind poet would have us see.

First of all there there is the city, Ilium, Troy, one of the great armed poleis of the ancient world -- more than two miles away from the beach where I stand now but still visible and beautiful and domineering on its high ground, its tall walls lighted by thousands of torches and bonfires, its towers not quite as topless as Marlowe would have us believe, but still amazing -- tall, rounded, alien, imposing.

Then there are the Achaeans and Danaans and other invaders -- technically not yet "Greeks" since that nation will not come into being for more than two thousand years, but I will call them Greeks anyway -- stretched mile after mile here along the shoreline. When I taught the Iliad, I told my students that the Trojan War, for all its Homeric glory, had probably been a small affair in reality -- some few thousands of Greek warriors against a few thousand Trojans. Even the best informed members of the scholia -- that group of Iliad scholars going back almost two millennia -- estimated from the poem that there could not possibly be more than 50,000 Achaeans and other Greek warriors drawn up in their black ships along the shore.

They were wrong. Estimates now show that there are more than 250,000 attacking Greeks and about half that number of defending Trojans and their allies. Evidently every warrior hero in the Greek Isles came running to this battle -- for battle meant plunder -- and brought his soldiers and allies and retainers and slaves and concubines with him.

The visual impact is stunning: mile upon mile of lighted tents, campfires, sharpened-stake defenses, miles of trenches dug in the hard ground above the beaches -- not for hiding and hunkering in, but as a deterrent to Trojan cavalry -- and, illuminating all those miles of tents and men and shining on polished spears and bright shields, thousands of bonfires and cooking fires and corpse fires burning bright.

Corpse fires.

For the past few weeks, pestilence has been creeping through the Greek ranks, first killing donkeys and dogs, then dropping a soldier here, a servant there, until suddenly in the past ten days it has become an epidemic, slaying more Achaean and Danaan heroes than the defenders of Ilium have in months. I suspect it is typhus. The Greeks are sure it is the anger of Apollo.

I've seen Apollo from a distance -- both on Olympos and here -- and he's a very nasty fellow. Apollo is the archer god, lord of the silver bow, "he who strikes from afar," and while he's the god of healing, he's also the god of disease. More than that, he's the principle divine ally of the Trojans in this battle, and if Apollo were to have his way, the Achaeans would be wiped out. Whether this typhoid came from the corpse-fouled rivers and other polluted water here or from Apollo's silver bow, the Greeks are right to think that he wishes them ill.

At this moment the Achaean "lords and kings" -- and every one of these Greek heroes is a sort of king or lord in his own province and in his own eyes -- are gathering in a public assembly ...

Ilium . Copyright &#copy; by Dan Simmons. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 57 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(23)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(7)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 57 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2011

    Great!!!

    what can I say but that I really like the way she writes. I havent been disappointed in any of her books. I like all the uncles even if they really were overprotective.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2010

    I Love this series, they all need to be ebooks

    I need these on ebooks! Please, please, please release these in digital format.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2006

    Don't be so harsh

    I understand why this isn't everyone's favorite Johanna Lindsay novel, but I think that some of the other reviews are a bit harsh. It is your typical historical romance novel- a strong, sassy heroine, her gorgeous yet mysterious love interest, and of course, a number of extraordinary obstacles that threaten to keep them apart. In the beginning, it is hard to understand why Melissa and Lincoln are so into one another- they both had their minds set on marrying one another after just one brief, five minute meeting. However, as the plot draws on, you can't help but root for these two characters, who are so very much in love.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2005

    umm yea

    well the books wasnt her best but it wasnt horrible although i would liek to say that all the critics who are in this page were mistaken in beleivng this is a sequel to 'say you love me' since that is acutally a malory novel, it is actually a sequel to 'love me forever'

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2004

    I loved this book!

    I liked the way the characters were developed in this story. I found them complex and likable. Having faith in love is a wonderful thing.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2002

    fast-paced yet amsuing story

    In Scotland, sixteen interfering, muscular and fearsome MacFearson uncles insure that none of her suitors meets the different criteria set by each one of Melissa MacGregor¿s caring relatives. To help Melissa, find a spouse, her parents (stars of LOVE ME FOREVER) pry her away from the well meaning crowd and plan to send her to London. <P>Before leaving her family on her adventure, Melissa spends time with her younger cousins at a pond. Not long afterward, Viscount Lincoln Barnett, just home from two decades of family enforced exile, rides by the pond. Lincoln and Melissa react positively towards one another. However, in a bloodthirsty feeding frenzy, her uncles go bongos when they learn that Lincoln is Melissa¿s choice. They remember an incident two decades ago when he behaved like a berserker so now they plan to keep this lunatic away from their beloved niece. They might contain Lincoln, but when it comes to love Melissa is fiercer than any other MacFearson. <P> THE PURSUIT is a humorous historical romance that contains a fast-paced story line. Though quite amusing, the tale also comprises a deep dysfunctional yet poignant relationship between Lincoln and his mother. Fans will have to get over the fact that the doting uncles truly hold an incident that they helped cause when Lincoln was ten against him as anecdotal evidence that the lead protagonist is dangerous. Though the tension is between the couple and her uncle (as opposed to that of the lead protagonists), the tale remains a fine sequel to Johanna Lindsey¿s LOVE ME FOREVER. <P>Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2001

    Love Me Forever...Sequel

    This is Melissa's story. The daughter of Lachlan MacGregor and Kimberly Richards. If this is the sequel to Say You Love Me, then that means the Malory's are involved. Which one? Could it be Jeremy? Or how about Marshall or Travis? We haven't heard to much about these two brothers, Edward's sons. But the 16 uncles are the sons of Laird MacFearsons who is the father of Kimberly Richards. Uniting these to story lines would be very interesting.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2014

    This has always been one of my favorites of hers. I know some ga

    This has always been one of my favorites of hers. I know some gave bad reviews but ignore. I'm very hard to please yet I loved this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    A good read.

    Not her best but I still enjoyed it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2005

    Pure Dreck!

    It has been many years since I have picked up a Johanna Lindsey book. In college I was a faithful reader and adored her writing. Recently on vacation I thought 'Wow, perfect beach companion.' What a disappointment. Pure drivel. Either Johanna Lindsey no longer writes these books and licenses her name out to hacks, or she has completely lost her ability to write after all these years. She didn't even try to keep a readers interest. I havent read a book in years that I absolutely could care less about the characters or the storyline as much as this one. I guess when you read true best sellers like The DaVinci Code you cant possibly go back to this kind of drivel.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2004

    The worst JL has ever written

    This is definitely her worst. I have read all of her books and this is just terrible. The plot is just ridiculous and it is so drawn out.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2002

    Pass this one by.

    I am convinced that the only reason this story was published is because Johanna Lindsey is the author. I cannot remember the last time I read a book (actually I 'read' it as a book on tape, unabridged version) with such an incredibly contrived plot. It is impossible for me to believe that rational, mature adults would hold against a 29-year old man something he did at the age of 10!! And that is what this whole story revolves around. Give me a break. Another very significant feature of the book that made it annoying was that Mellie seemed to be the 29-year old adult and Lincoln seemed to be the 18-year old in this match. If you are wondering why I finished it, I was trapped with it in the car on a long, long drive, AND I kept believing it would get better and had to see if it did. It did not.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2014

    I loved it!

    Her uncles were halarious and true love prevails. I have no complaints.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 11, 2013

    Highly recommend

    Terrific historical romance

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 10, 2012

    Pure torture! I have trully liked some of Johanna Lindsey book

    Pure torture! I have trully liked some of Johanna Lindsey books...but this was so bad! the whole book deals with missteps made by a ten year old boy, a bunch of rediculous scottish hoodlums, and unbelieveable love at first sight. The characters fall in love at first sight. The very next day finds Lincoln going to Meli's home to ask her father for permission to marry her? Really? after a few minutes conversation by a pond? This whole story was too far fetched to be remotely beliveable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2004

    didn't live up to it's potential

    While I love Lindsay's novels I was very disappointed in this one. The ties between Lincoln and the uncles caused for a shallow and unbelieveable plot. And the constant twists and turns the book had were not only unnecessary, they too led to a silly unbelieveable plot. Though I was rather amused, the constant change of events was very exhausting to follow and I wasn't able to relate to the characters feelings other than feel contempt for their petty traits

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2003

    It was a great book!

    This was the best book I've read in a while! I couldn't put it down. Johanna Lindsey is a fabulous author. If you are thinking about buying this book...stop thinking and buy it! It's great!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2003

    Not Her Best...

    Although this is far from a Malory Novel, I liked this book. I thought the 16 uncles were funny, and brought in the JL humor. I wished there was more with Devlin, and Justin, but overall I thought it was a good read, if only that I got to read more about characters that I was already invested in.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2003

    did johanna lindsey even write this book?!

    Did not like this book even a little, I have read just about everything from lindsey and this is the first time I have ever been disapointed by one of her books. I did not like the 'hero' if you could even call him that. Im used to heros and heroins that do things their own way, and their by the book courtship was just boring. Lindsey is still one of the best, I guess you cant win them all huh?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2003

    Refund please!!

    The only reason I finished this novel is because the money was spent and I couldn't get a refund. Now the book is being used to prop an end table. The plot was ridiculous. The characters were unbelievable. Then Lindsey revealed secrets at the end that no one was ever curious about. I believe I actually got angry while reading the book, when it became apparent that I had wasted my time. I have read everything Lindsey has published. I hope that this book is not evidence of what is to come from now on. Recommendation from an admirer of her work: Lindsey please take a break from your writing if you need one. Then come back strong. Your readers will no doubt thank you for it. I know I would much rather read a good book after a long time, than a terrible book anytime.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 57 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)