Pursuit Of Happiness

Pursuit Of Happiness

3.7 76
by Douglas Kennedy
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Manhattan, Thanksgiving Eve, 1945. The war was over, and Eric Smythe's party was in full swing. All his clever Greenwich Village friends were there. So too was his sister Sara -- an independent, canny young woman, starting to make her way in the big city. And then in walked a gatecrasher, Jack Malone -- a U. S. Army journalist just back from a defeated Germany, and a

Overview

Manhattan, Thanksgiving Eve, 1945. The war was over, and Eric Smythe's party was in full swing. All his clever Greenwich Village friends were there. So too was his sister Sara -- an independent, canny young woman, starting to make her way in the big city. And then in walked a gatecrasher, Jack Malone -- a U. S. Army journalist just back from a defeated Germany, and a man whose world-view did not tally with that of Eric and his friends. Set amidst the dynamic optimism of postwar New York and the subsequent nightmare of the McCarthy witch-hunts, The Pursuit of Happiness is a great tragic love story; a tale of divided loyalties, decisive moral choices, and the random workings of destiny.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780091793647
Publisher:
Random House of Canada, Limited
Publication date:
08/28/2001
Pages:
416

Meet the Author

Douglas Kennedy was born in Manhattan. His father was a commodities broker and his mother worked at NBC. In 1974 Douglas went to Trinity College, Dublin as a guest student. On graduating he returned to Dublin and started a co-operative theatre company with a friend. This led him to being hired to run the Abbey Theatre's second house, The Peacock. It was as this time that he began to write. At the age of 28 Douglas resigned from his job at the theatre to write full time. He acquired an agent, and was given a small advance to write a travel book, Beyond the Pyramids. Two more non-fiction titles and a novel followed. Then in the late eighties Douglas and his wife moved to London and The Big Picture was published to great acclaim and a career as a bestselling author was secured. Douglas's books have been translated into sixteen different languages.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Pursuit of Happiness 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 76 reviews.
WowWow More than 1 year ago
While there is a fairly interesting story to be told here, it could have been pared down by a couple hundred pages. Page after page explaining various bouts of "writer's block" and money/financial issues left me feeling bored and unsatisfied. While I did want to find out about the final outcome for the characters, I found the journey fairly painful and tedious. Unfortunately, the final outcome also seemed anemic and unemotional. It was a "nice" ending, but it was completely forgettable.
Josee Bourret More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. Yes, it is a little long, but we can truly know the characters by the way they live, talk, react. Sara's story is really engaging. All in all, a great read that would have escaped me had it nit been free! Ihighly recommend it.
Jeanneous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book, but modtly kept reading it thinking that things would have to turn around for Sara. The writing was a bit erratic-sometimes choppy, sometimes too wordy, and then the story would skip four years in two pages. And Kate's story wasn't nearly as engaging as Sara's. However, overall it was a good story that really makes you think about how McCarthyism tore people's lives apart. Great for a Free Friday read.
Trixie_James More than 1 year ago
The storyline itself is decent enough, but it's so bogged down with tiny, insignificant details that I wanted to quit reading a couple hundred pages in. I found it a bit ironic that the main character is constantly paring down her writing and eliminating excess words when the author of this book was clearly unable to do that. The book is dragged along with a million simple sentences. It felt like I was reading a student's essay on something historical and boring. There are entire chapters that read like,"I made coffee. I typed a sentence. I sipped the coffee. I hate my life. I finished the coffee. I ripped the page from the typewriter and banged my head on the hard keys of the typewriter. It hurt." I made it through the book and really liked the heart of the story, but it would have been so much better had it been a hundred pages shorter.
vlblack More than 1 year ago
It's one of those stories that I keep thinking about days after I've finished it. I love stories set in post WWII. This one will keep you turning the pages. It has really made me rethink what defines happiness.
jzl More than 1 year ago
Good book. Covers areas of late 1940s and early 1950s and what went on with the communist phobia and blacklisting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago