Put Pulleys to the Test

Overview

What do flagpoles and some window blinds have in common? They use pulleys to perform work! Pulleys are simple machines. They help us to do jobs more easily. But don't take our word for it. Put pulleys to the test with the fun experiments you'll find in this book. As part of the Searchlight Books™ collection, this series sheds light on a key science question—How Do Simple Machines Work? Hands-on experiments, interesting photos, and useful diagrams will help you find the answer!

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Overview

What do flagpoles and some window blinds have in common? They use pulleys to perform work! Pulleys are simple machines. They help us to do jobs more easily. But don't take our word for it. Put pulleys to the test with the fun experiments you'll find in this book. As part of the Searchlight Books™ collection, this series sheds light on a key science question—How Do Simple Machines Work? Hands-on experiments, interesting photos, and useful diagrams will help you find the answer!

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This entry in the "Early Bird Physics" textbook series explains what work is, defines the simple machine under discussion, introduces special terminology such as fulcrum, fixed pulley, friction, or axle, and shows variations on that machine that make it more complicated. Simple hands-on activities explore some of the properties of a pulley and illustrate ways they are configured to increase or decrease the force needed to lift objects. A multiracial cast of children who look to be about nine or ten are photographed in posed situations to illustrate concepts and most of them look realistic. Diagrams also help children see where force is applied or what can be altered to make work easier. An endnote to adults presents helpful discussion questions and ways to explore the vocabulary specific to this machine while a bibliography of other books on the topic and two generic websites suggest further exploration. A glossary and index with a note on how to help children use these sources are added as well. All in all these books present solid support for adults in introducing simple machines to elementary age children. It is an appealing package children can also read for themselves. 2002, Lerner Publications, $23.93. Ages 7 to 10. Reviewer: Susan Hepler
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Written in simple language and sentences, these slim titles offer straightforward explanations of how things work. Starting with the basics, the material gradually builds upon readers' growing understanding of the concepts presented. The experiments suggested can be performed with little assistance and with materials found in the home. Clear, distinct, color photos of children demonstrating the activities on each page help reinforce the concepts, as do the many drawings and diagrams. Children will find these accessible titles informative, and may see their world in a different light after reading them. The narrow focus of each title may serve a purpose for classroom units.-Susan Shaver, Hemingford Public Schools, NE Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Annie Laura Smith
Machines make work easier. Those which have many moving parts such as trains and cars are known as complicated machines, and those which have few moving parts are defined as simple machines. The latter includes inclined planes, levers, pulleys, screws, wedges, and wheels and axles. The Contents page shows the scope of the information in the five chapters which address: Work, Machines, Gravity and Friction, and Kinds of Pulleys. The text and vivid photographs define the characteristics of pulleys such as flagpoles and some window blinds. Sidebars on each photograph explain a related scientific concept while hands-on experiments show these concepts. A section titled "Learn More about Simple Machines" lists relevant books and websites. The Glossary defines machinery-related terms. An Index provides easy navigation through the text. This book is part of the six-book "Searchlight Series" which address how simple machines work. Other books include Put Inclined Planes to the Test, Put Wheels and Axles to the Test, Put Levers to the Test, Put Screws to the Test, and Put Wedges to the Test. These books address the basic concepts of physics such as work, force, gravity, and friction, and will engage young readers, especially boys. Reviewer: Annie Laura Smith
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761378679
  • Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/28/2011
  • Series: How Do Simple Machines Work? Series
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 1,388,489
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Roseann Feldmann earned her B.A. degree in biology, chemistry, and education at the College of St. Francis and her M.S. in education from Northern Illinois University. As an educator, she has been a classroom teacher, college instructor, curriculum author, and administrator. She currently serves as the principal at St. Peter School, an elementary school in Geneva, Illinois.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Work 4

Chapter 2 Machines 8

Chapter 3 Gravity 10

Chapter 4 Friction 19

Chapter 5 Kinds of Pulleys 24

Glossary 38

Learn More about Simple Machines 39

Index 40

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2011

    This is an excellent book for young students to learn a bout pulleys (simple machines)...

    Every day you do work of some sort of another, even if you don't think it's work. For example, when you play cards you are actually working. If you work up a sweat trying to push on the side of a house and move it you are not. When a scientist defines work he or she means that "work is using a force to move an object" and that "force is a push or a pull." You can move cards, but unless you are Superman, you aren't going to move a house simply by pushing it. If you turn the pages of a book, no matter how easy it seems, you are actually working because if something moves "work has been done."

    There are two kinds of machines, simple and complicated, that we use to make our work easier. You'll learn the difference between the two kinds and once you do perhaps you can point out several different kinds of machines around you. You'll also learn about how gravity factors into the work formula. For example, it is much easier to lower something to the ground than lift it because gravity helps you. There are several experiments in this book that will show you how force works when you use different kinds of pulleys. In this book you'll also learn about measuring force, friction, different kinds of pulleys and their functions (fixed, moveable, and compound), and you'll learn many other interesting facts about how pulleys work.

    This is an excellent book for young students to learn a bout pulleys (simple machines). The most striking feature of this book are the detailed experiments that children can run to demonstrate what pulleys are and how they work. There are no complicated or expensive materials to purchase as most are readily available (spools, screwdriver, tape, straw, string, soda can, etc.). The only thing that may be necessary to purchase would be a spring scale to measure the amount of force needed to life a load. The necessary equipment needed for each experiment is listed in the text and shown in a visual display. Photographs clearly show how students are working through each pulley experiment. In the back of the book is an index, a glossary, and additional recommended book and website resources to explore.

    This book courtesy of the publisher.

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