Putting Data To Work: Occupational Health Indicators From Thirteen Pilot States For 2000

Putting Data To Work: Occupational Health Indicators From Thirteen Pilot States For 2000

by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Henry Anderson, Carrie Breton, David Bonauto
     
 

More than 135 million individuals work in the United States. Every year, millions
of these workers are injured on the job or become ill as a result of exposure to health hazards at work. These work-related injuries and illnesses result in substantial human and economic costs not only for workers and employers, but also for society at large. Workers’…  See more details below

Overview

More than 135 million individuals work in the United States. Every year, millions
of these workers are injured on the job or become ill as a result of exposure to health hazards at work. These work-related injuries and illnesses result in substantial human and economic costs not only for workers and employers, but also for society at large. Workers’ compensation claims alone cost approximately $46 billion in 2000.1 It has been estimated that the direct and indirect costs of work-related injuries and illnesses exceed $170 billion annually.2 Work-related injuries and illnesses can be prevented. Successful approaches to making workplaces safer and healthier begin with having the data necessary to understand the problem. Public health surveillance data are needed to determine the magnitude of work-related injuries and illnesses, identify workers at greatest risk, and establish prevention priorities.

Data are also necessary to measure the effectiveness of prevention activities,
and to identify workplace health and safety problems that need further investigation.

This report presents the application of the OHI methodology in 13 states that participated in a pilot project of these indicators for the year 2000. The report begins with demographic profiles of the workforce in the U.S. and participating states. Each OHI measure is presented with 2000 data listed alphabetically by state in each figure and table. A brief narrative about the significance of the OHI precedes each indicator’s data. Where available, information for the nation is provided as a basis for comparison. A description of the data sources used to generate the OHIs, including significant data limitations, is provided after the OHI chapters.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013333437
Publisher:
1001 Property Solutions LLC
Publication date:
09/13/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
8 MB

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