Putting Humans First: Why We Are Nature's Favorite

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Overview

Putting Humans First passionately argues for the primacy of human life in the natural world and the corresponding justice of humans making use of animals; it disputes the concept of "animal rights" and "animal liberation." It shows human beings to be very much a part of nature, though not, ordinarily, of the wilds. Given their nature, Machan argues that human beings not only can, but ought to use nature to serve their own needs.
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Editorial Reviews

The Weekly Standard
Tibor R. Machan doesn't like the animal-rights or radical environment movements, and with good cause. Both exhibit anti-human attitudes, he writes, for each rejects the idea that human beings should be the primary concern of human beings. A Chapman University professor, Machan begins his slim volume on a strong note with a cogent critique of the philosophical underpinnings of animal-liberation philosophy.
— Wesley Smith
Chronicle of Higher Education
A defense of human primacy in a hierarchy of nature and a critique of radical environmentalism.
Angela Logomasini
In Putting Humans First, Machan offers an insightful, philosophic, and practical assessment of animal rights and environmental movements. Machan reveals how these philosophies would willingly sacrifice human freedoms by denying basic truths about both man and nature. He shows us that stewardship would be better served by celebrating and employing—rather than vilifying—mankind’s creative and moral nature.
The Weekly Standard - Wesley Smith
Tibor R. Machan doesn't like the animal-rights or radical environment movements, and with good cause. Both exhibit anti-human attitudes, he writes, for each rejects the idea that human beings should be the primary concern of human beings. A Chapman University professor, Machan begins his slim volume on a strong note with a cogent critique of the philosophical underpinnings of animal-liberation philosophy.
Jay Lehr
Putting Humans First should become the gold standard for warm and friendly human beings endeavoring to understand and explain why, though we may love animals and nature, they are intrinsically inferior to humans.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Tibor R. Machan is currently R. C. Hoiles Professor of Business Ethics & Free Enterprise at the Argyros School of Business & Economics, Chapman University, Orange, CA, and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 A Case for Animal Rights? Chapter 2 The Case for Specieism Chapter 3 A Sound Environmentalism Chapter 4 Putting Humans First
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2005

    Too much flash, not enough substance

    This book is a great example of sloppy philosophy. A widely-recognized distinction (namely, that between moral agents and moral patients) is ignored but for a single paragraph. Machan's belittling of the environmentalists' position (as though there were one single position) is distracting, and his inaccurate characterization of evolutionary theory is hardly worthy of attention. In short, Machan has offered us a flashy, yet grossly undersupported and insubstantial, view.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2004

    Finally some environmental sanity

    This work, aimed at the general reader, isn't always easy going, mainly because the author must deal with very clever positions that ascribe rights to most animals or aim to liberate them from human dominion. Still, Machan does make a clear case that animals could not have rights, any more than they could be guilty of violating anyone's rights--they aren't what he calls 'moral agents.' The rest of the work makes out the view that human beings are indeed the crown of evolutionary creation and that a consistent, sane public policy must implement that idea instead of wondering about aimlessly driven by sentiment.

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