Putumayo Presents: Mexico

Putumayo Presents: Mexico

     
 

Ask any Mexican to list his or her favorite national artists, and odds are the result will have little in common with Putumayo's Mexico. But that's the beauty of this compilation, which digs deep for the kinds of lilting Latin folksongs, indigenous rhythms, and coastal dance styles of the United States' southern neighbor while bypassing the vastly more popular See more details below

Overview

Ask any Mexican to list his or her favorite national artists, and odds are the result will have little in common with Putumayo's Mexico. But that's the beauty of this compilation, which digs deep for the kinds of lilting Latin folksongs, indigenous rhythms, and coastal dance styles of the United States' southern neighbor while bypassing the vastly more popular norteño, mariachi, banda, and cumbia music that most Mexicans actually listen to. There's not much big hat stuff here -- even the classic ranchera "Rogaciano," performed by La Calaca, bubbles with Aztec derived huapango rhythms. Instead, this Mexico is a sweeping course in the son (regional folk styles) from Veracruz (the sones jarochos "Flor de Huevo" and "La Bruja"), the isthmus (the sones istmeños "La Petrona" and "Mediu Xhiga"), and the Yucatán ("Nuestro Nido"), as well as surprising indigenous-language songs from Oaxaca and Tehuantepec. Iconoclastic artists such as the bewitching Lhasa de Sela, Lila Downs, and Claudia Martinez are relative unknowns in Mexico, but their inclusion here creates an exotic ambience that the blaring brass of banda and mariachi seldom deliver. For a Mexico you won't find at your local nacho emporium, book a ticket for this audio exploration.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Tom Schulte
Putumayo planned the release of Putumayo Presents: Mexico to be in time for the first Cinco de Mayo celebration of the 21st Century. The sampling is suitably festive from this rich land of song. A true melting pot of indigenous and imported sounds, Putumayo Presents: Mexico distills German polkas, the seducing balladry of the Cuban bolero, and more on a foundation of native folk sounds. Reaching back to the Mexican folk roots, Los Lobos contribute the first song they ever composed, "Flor de Huevo."

Product Details

Release Date:
04/24/2001
Label:
Putumayo World Music
UPC:
0790248018720
catalogNumber:
187
Rank:
535

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