The Quail Club

Overview

Like THE GOLD-THREADED DRESS, Carolyn Marsden's acclaimed first novel, this sensitive and finely crafted sequel explores what it takes to be a true friend, and still be true to yourself.

Oy lives in America now, but she loves to go to the back room of Pak's auto shop on Saturdays to learn traditional Thai dances. She loves it almost as much as being a member of the Quail Club - five friends who gather after school to hatch and care for baby ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (2) from   
  • New (1) from $0.00   
  • Used (1) from $0.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 0 of 1
We’re having technical difficulties. Please try again shortly.
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 0 of 1
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Like THE GOLD-THREADED DRESS, Carolyn Marsden's acclaimed first novel, this sensitive and finely crafted sequel explores what it takes to be a true friend, and still be true to yourself.

Oy lives in America now, but she loves to go to the back room of Pak's auto shop on Saturdays to learn traditional Thai dances. She loves it almost as much as being a member of the Quail Club - five friends who gather after school to hatch and care for baby quail. When the teacher announces a talent show, Oy knows how proud her family and Pak would be to see her step onstage in her beautiful gold-threaded dress from Thailand. But bossy Liliandra vows to kick her out of the Quail Club if she won't team up for a very different kind of dance. Someone will be disappointed. But who?
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
PW called How to Train Your Dragon a "riotous paper-over-board farce." In his third caper, How to Speak Dragonese by Cressida Cowell, Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III must rescue his captured beloved dragon, Toothless. Ages 8-10. (May) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Oy faces an identity challenge when confronted with a school talent show. She would like to perform her traditional Thai dance but Liliandra, leader of their Quail Club, states that if Oy does not dance with her then she will kick Oy out of their club. Since Oy enjoys not only taking care of the little birds but also having some American friends to be with, she figures that dancing with Liliandra is a small price to pay. However as the time for the talent show draws near, Oy realizes that it is not just dancing to her. It also goes against her cultural beliefs. Oy learns that being Thai is okay and shares this newfound knowledge with Liliandra, who comes to accept Oy for who she is. Depicting both the struggles to fit into the new country even after a couple of years of living there, and the desire to hold onto personal heritage, this would be a wonderful choice for any English as a Second Language classroom. This book is the sequel to The Gold-Threaded Dress. 2006, Candlewick Press, Ages 9 to 13.
—Angela Olkey
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-A compelling sequel to The Gold-Threaded Dress (Candlewick, 2002). Being invited to join the Quail Club means that fifth-grader Oy feels less an outsider, more American, even if she doesn't even know what a quail is; it means she has friends. That friendship is tested when their teacher announces a talent show and Liliandra decides that Oy must dance an American dance with her, as shown on television. Oy, strongly supported by her parents, wants to perform one of her Thai dances, wearing her beautiful gold-threaded dress. When dancing with Liliandra becomes the condition under which Oy is allowed to stay in the Quail Club, tension ensues. Torn between two cultures, torn between honoring the wishes of a friend and her own, Oy finds a satisfying resolution. Throughout the text, Thai words add much to the cultural authenticity. Girls in particular will read to discover answers to these questions: How can I fit into a new community without losing my uniqueness? As one already in the community, how should I respond to the newcomer? A perennial topic is handled with poignancy and grace.-Alexa Sandmann, Kent State University, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In this sequel to The Gold-Threaded Dress (2002), Oy, called Olivia by her American friends, wants to perform the Thai dances she loves in the fifth-grade talent show. Liliandra, however, the boss of the girls' Quail Club, wants Oy to do American-style dancing with her. Many Thai customs-the Buddha in the house, Songkran, the Thai new year-are delicately interspersed in what is essentially a rather pedestrian story. Liliandra is bossy and rude and has parents who are often absent. Oy wants to be in the club where five girls are watching baby quail hatch from eggs (the girls are Spanish and Finnish and more American than Oy feels she is), but she is cast out by Liliandra for choosing the Thai dance over hers. Oy introduces Liliandra to the Songkran celebration and invites her to learn a Thai dance from her own teacher in an artificial denouement that finds both girls performing in the talent show. Middle-grade girls might find some interest in this classic school dilemma, enriched by the cross-cultural notes. (Fiction. 8-11)
From the Publisher
Oy would never forget the day when Liliandra had tapped her on the shoulder and held out a piece of paper that began: You are invited . . . At first, Oy thought it was a birthday party invitation. But this seemed even better. A club . . . Oy hadn’t even known what quail meant, but she’d wanted to be part of the group of friends.

Hejski’s dad had taken all five of them to an ice-cream parlor to celebrate the formation of the club. They’d sat at round tables in the sunshine, and Oy had licked her coconut-flavored scoop extra slowly.

Afterward they’d set up the incubator on Hejski’s back porch and studied pictures of quail on the Internet. Oy had learned that quail were birds with plumes on their heads. . . .

She couldn’t imagine not being part of the club. If Liliandra made her leave, she wouldn’t see the quail hatch. But even more important than the quail was the chance to hang out with the other girls. To talk about silly things. To make plans together. To have friends. To be a friend. She hadn’t been lonely since the club was formed.

_______

THE QUAIL CLUB by Carolyn Marsden. Copyright © 2006 by Carolyn Marsden. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611066371
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 6/14/2011
  • Format: MP3 on CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Age range: 7 - 9 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.37 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Carolyn Marsden is the author of numerous books for younger readers. She has an MFA in Writing for Children from Vermont College.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt



The Quail Club




By Carolyn Marsden


Candlewick



Copyright © 2006

Carolyn Marsden

All right reserved.


ISBN: 076362635X



Oy would never forget the day when Liliandra had tapped her
on the shoulder and held out a piece of paper that began: You are
invited . . . At first, Oy thought it was a birthday party invitation. But
this seemed even better. A club . . . Oy hadn't even known what quail
meant, but she'd wanted to be part of the group of friends.

Hejski's dad had taken all five of them to an ice-cream parlor to
celebrate the formation of the club. They'd sat at round tables in the
sunshine, and Oy had licked her coconut-flavored scoop extra slowly.

Afterward they'd set up the incubator on Hejski's back porch and
studied pictures of quail on the Internet. Oy had learned that quail were
birds with plumes on their heads. . . .

She couldn't imagine not being part of the club. If Liliandra made
her leave, she wouldn't see the quail hatch. But even more important
than the quail was the chance to hang out with the other girls. To talk
about silly things. To make plans together. To have friends. To be a
friend. She hadn't been lonely since the club was formed.

_______

THE QUAIL CLUB by Carolyn Marsden. Copyright 2006 by Carolyn Marsden. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.


Continues...




Excerpted from The Quail Club
by Carolyn Marsden
Copyright © 2006 by Carolyn Marsden.
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.


Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)