Quaker Constitutionalism and the Political Thought of John Dickinson

Quaker Constitutionalism and the Political Thought of John Dickinson

by Jane E. Calvert
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0521884365

ISBN-13: 9780521884365

Pub. Date: 12/31/2008

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

In the late-seventeenth century, Quakers originated a unique strain of constitutionalism, based on their theology and ecclesiology, which emphasized constitutional perpetuity and radical change through popular peaceful protest. While Whigs could imagine no other means of drastic constitutional reform except revolution, Quakers denied this as a legitimate option to

Overview

In the late-seventeenth century, Quakers originated a unique strain of constitutionalism, based on their theology and ecclesiology, which emphasized constitutional perpetuity and radical change through popular peaceful protest. While Whigs could imagine no other means of drastic constitutional reform except revolution, Quakers denied this as a legitimate option to governmental abuse of authority and advocated instead civil disobedience. This theory of a perpetual yet amendable constitution and its concomitant idea of popular sovereignty are things that most scholars believe did not exist until the American Founding. The most notable advocate of this theory was Founding Father John Dickinson, champion of American rights, but not revolution. His thought and action have been misunderstood until now, when they are placed within the Quaker tradition. This theory of Quaker constitutionalism can be traced in a clear and direct line from early Quakers through Dickinson to Martin Luther King, Jr.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521884365
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
12/31/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
396
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; Part I. Quaker Constitutionalism in Theory and Practice, c.1652-1763: 1. Bureaucratic libertines: the origins of Quaker constitutionalism and civil dissent; 2. A sacred institution: the Quaker theory of a civil constitution; 3. 'Dissenters in our own country': constituting a Quaker government in Pennsylvania; 4. Civil unity and 'seeds of dissention' in the golden age of Quaker theocracy; 5. The fruits of Quaker dissent: political schism and the rise of John Dickinson; Part II. The Political Quakerism of John Dickinson, 1763-89: 6. Turbulent but pacific: 'Dickinsonian politics' in the American revolution; 7. 'The worthy against the licentious': the critical period in Pennsylvania; 8. 'The political rock of our salvation': The US Constitution according to John Dickinson; Epilogue: the persistence of Quaker constitutionalism, 1789-1963; Bibliography; Index.

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