Quantificational Topics: A Scopal Treatment of Exceptional Wide Scope Phenomena / Edition 1

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More About This Textbook

Overview

Addressing an issue that has puzzled the linguistics community for many years, this book offers a novel approach to the exceptional wide scope behaviour of indefinites. It is the first book explicitly dedicated to exceptional wide scope phenomena. Its unique approach offers an explanation for the fact that it is only a proper subset of the indefinites that shows this exceptional wide scope behaviour.

The author draws a careful distinction between genuine and apparent scope readings, a distinction that is usually not taken care of and has thus led to certain confusions. In particular, it is argued that functional readings have to be kept strictly apart from non-functional ones and that all proposals that use functional mechanisms to explain the phenomena at hand face severe problems.

The existing body of literature on the main issues of the book is thoroughly reviewed. This makes the book well suited as background literature for graduate seminars on those topics.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789048123025
  • Publisher: Springer Netherlands
  • Publication date: 4/28/2009
  • Series: Studies in Linguistics and Philosophy Series , #86
  • Edition description: 2009
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 308
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Information Structure 1

1.2 Truth-Conditional Effects of Information Structure 5

1.3 Topical Quantifiers 6

1.4 Topicality and Exceptional Wide Scope 8

1.5 An Outline of the Proposal 12

1.6 The Structure of this Book 16

2 Topicality 19

2.1 Defining Topicality 19

2.1.1 Aboutness 20

2.1.2 Familiarity 21

2.1.3 Topics as Entities 23

2.1.4 Indefinite Topics 23

2.1.5 Reinhart (1981) 26

2.2 Topic Tests and Topical Quantifiers 29

2.2.1 Simple Tests 30

2.2.2 Syntactic Marking 32

2.2.3 Intonational Marking 44

2.2.4 Morphological Marking 47

2.2.5 A Discourse Configurational Language: Hungarian 50

2.2.6 Alleged Topic Tests 51

2.3 Conclusion 55

3 Genuine and Apparent Scope Readings 57

3.1 Specificity 57

3.1.1 Ioup (1977) 58

3.1.2 Hintikka (1986) 62

3.1.3 En&ccidle; (1991) 63

3.1.4 Consequences 65

3.2 Wide Scope 69

3.2.1 Apparent Wide Scope 70

3.2.2 Apparent vs. Genuine Wide Scope 74

3.3 Functional Readings 86

3.3.1 Data 86

3.3.2 Natural Functions 90

3.3.3 Properties of Natural Functions 92

3.3.4 Apparent vs. Genuine Narrow Scope 101

3.4 Conclusion 104

4 Exceptional Wide Scope 107

4.1 Scope Islands 107

4.2 The Class of Wide Scope Quantifiers 112

4.3 Genuine vs. Apparent Exceptional Wide Scope 115

4.4 Approaches Relying on Speaker's Reference 118

4.4.1 Fodor and Sag (1982) 118

4.4.2 Other Approaches 123

4.4.3 Problems 123

4.5 Approaches Relying on Domain Restriction 133

4.5.1 Schwarzschild (2002) 134

4.5.2 Other Approaches 136

4.5.3 Problems 136

4.6 Presuppositional Approaches 138

4.6.1 Yeom (1998) 138

4.6.2 Cresti (1995) 144

4.6.3 Other Approaches 150

4.6.4 Problems151

4.7 Choice Function Approaches 152

4.7.1 Reinhart (1997); Winter (1997) 152

4.7.2 Kratzer (1998) 156

4.7.3 Problems 165

4.7.4 Consequences 174

4.8 Approaches Relying on Wide Extraction 182

4.9 Discussion 182

4.10 Conclusion 184

5 Semantic Effects of Topicality 187

5.1 Types of Aboutness Topics 187

5.2 Intonation 191

5.3 Topicality Induces Wide Scope 197

5.3.1 Genuine Wide Scope vs. Apparent Wide Scope 197

5.3.2 Apparent Non-Wide Scope Interpretations of Direct Aboutness Topics 202

5.4 Does a Strong Interpretation Imply Topicality? 206

5.5 Approaches Relating Exceptional Wide Scope to Topicality 208

5.6 Conclusion 211

6 Exceptional Wide Scope as a Topic Phenomenon 213

6.1 Deriving the Classification 216

6.2 Technical Preliminaries 222

6.2.1 Quantifier Semantics 222

6.2.2 Structured Meanings 233

6.3 Components of the Theory 235

6.3.1 Creating a Topic Discourse Referent 236

6.3.2 The Topic Condition 238

6.3.3 Quantifier Classification 239

6.3.4 Topic Assert 245

6.4 Deriving Wide Scope via Topicality 246

6.5 Intermediate Scope Readings 249

6.5.1 Data 249

6.5.2 Analysis 254

6.5.3 Problems 258

6.6 Functional Topics 260

6.6.1 The Interpretation of Functional DPs 263

6.6.2 Topic Interpretation and the Topic Condition with Functional DPs 265

6.7 Conclusion 268

7 Conclusion 271

A Technicalities and Experiments 281

A.1 Generalized Quantifiers 281

A.1.1 Monotonicity 281

A.1.2 Witness Sets 281

A.1.3 Lexical Quantifier Semantics 281

A.2 Pilot Studies 283

A.2.1 The Accent Pattern of Wide Scope Indefinites 283

A.2.2 Wide Scope vs. 'Anti-Distributivity' 285

Bibliography 291

Index 305

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