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Quantum Theology: Spiritual Implications of the New Physics
     

Quantum Theology: Spiritual Implications of the New Physics

5.0 1
by Diarmuid O'Murchu
 

ISBN-10: 082452263X

ISBN-13: 9780824522636

Pub. Date: 04/01/2004

Publisher: Crossroad Publishing Company


Here, best-selling author Diarmuid O'Murchu presents a vision of the intersection of quantum physics and spirituality. It is now revised to reflect the most recent advances in physics. From black holes to holograms, from relativity theory to the discovery of quarks, this book is an original and rich exposition of quantum theory and the way it unravels profound

Overview


Here, best-selling author Diarmuid O'Murchu presents a vision of the intersection of quantum physics and spirituality. It is now revised to reflect the most recent advances in physics. From black holes to holograms, from relativity theory to the discovery of quarks, this book is an original and rich exposition of quantum theory and the way it unravels profound theological questions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780824522636
Publisher:
Crossroad Publishing Company
Publication date:
04/01/2004
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
577,465
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.51(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction to the Revised Edition1
Part 1The Invitation
1.You Are Invited ...5
2.What do We Mean by Theology?9
Theology and Religion11
Theology and Spirituality13
Contemporary Theology15
Conclusion22
3.What is the Quantum All About?24
The Classical Model25
The Quantum Theory28
Do We Create Our Own Reality?33
Wholistic Consciousness35
Part 2The Dance
4.Energy, Movement, and Rhythm45
Dancing to Our Sacredness47
Dance of the Gods49
Dance as a Scientific Metaphor50
The Symmetry Within53
Music as a Pulse of Creation53
The God Question55
5.Wholes and Parts58
Beyond the Mechanistic Metaphor59
Wholes and Parts60
Our Holographic Universe61
The World as Subject64
Wholeness and Uniqueness65
Part 3The Relationship
6.The Horizon of Belonging71
Fields of Influence72
In Relation to the Whole75
Whither Revelation?78
7.Beyond Our Isolation85
Trinitarian Relatedness87
Individual Uniqueness91
The Search for Community93
Part 4The Story
8.In the Beginning101
The Potential for Self-Organization103
The Gaia Hypothesis105
Propensity for Self-Regulation109
The Creative Vacuum110
The Anthropic Principle112
Humans and Gaia113
Theological Implications114
9.Stories Generate Meaning117
Stories Stretch the Imagination118
The Word as Story120
The Central Myth of the Christian Story122
Interpreting Sacred Texts124
Story in Peril?125
Part 5The Shadow
10.Embracing the Dark131
Black Holes132
The Theory of Chaos135
Being and Nothingness139
Salvation and Redemption141
11.Integrating the Shadow145
The Power of Dualisms147
Integrating the Shadow149
Sins of Our Time151
Part 6The Light
12.The Search for Enlightenment163
The Light That Shines165
The Path to Enlightenment167
The Sacrament of Light170
The Sacramental Process172
13.Reaching Toward Infinity175
Resurrection from the Dead176
The Universal Will to Life178
Whither Afterlife?180
World without End?183
Part 7The Future
14.The Promise and the Peril189
Our Calvary Moment190
Quantum Yearnings: Within and Without193
God and Creation in Process195
15.No Greater Love...198
Power of Love or Love of Power?199
The Embodiment of Love200
New Horizons of Human Sexuality201
The Spirit as Friend204
The Love That Liberates206
Appendix 1Principles of Quantum Theology209
Appendix 2Doing Theology in a Space-Time Continuum215
Notes219
Bibliography223
Index235

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Quantum Theology: Spiritual Implications of the New Physics 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
PFlinders More than 1 year ago
A reading of any of the works of this great priest--and I've read them all--will require both an open heart and an open mind. Orthodox scientists and orthodox theologians will not take kindly to his writings, just as they did not take kindly to O'Murchu's predecessor, Teilhard de Chardin, who in the last century also tried to bring science and religion together and was banned by Rome for his efforts. Those of us still stuck in the Cartesian paradigm, that man is mind and no more, will no doubt have to be dragged kicking and screaming out of that paradigm into O'Murchu's often highly imaginative musings as to just where our collective human soul is going. I know. I used to be a "devout" Cartesian. But...I find it maddeningly curious that, at the very same time Rene Descartes was reducing us to mind per se, in the very same glorious Sun King France, very same decade nearly, very same amphitheatre of the Sorbonne, in fact, we were given an alternative in the person of a child prodigy whose eleven year-old mind re-invented Euclid's principles entirely, went on to become at least as great a scientist as Descartes, then renounced it all for God and died a mystic at the age of 39. Had the French taken to Blaise Pascal as much as they, and the whole world later on, took to his rival, we might not be in the reductionist, mechanistic mess we find ourselves in today. It's Pascal's turn now. Four hundred years later, in what many now see as the last gasp of the Industrial Revolution and with, as O'Murchu suggests in nearly all his works, human consciousness poised at the beginning of a new--spiritual--revolution, JE PENSE DONC JE SUIS ("I think; therefore, I am") is over. We'd do better reflecting on Pascal's LE COEUR A SES RAISONS QUE LA RAISON NE CONNAIT PAS ("The heart has its reasons that reason knows not") and read O'Murchu in this latter light. In so doing, one might find something clarifying, even hopeful, as I did in the two chapters on evil, "Embracing the Dark" and "Integrating the Shadow." Neither scientist nor theologian, I think I've got a foothold at least in my understanding of such concepts as Jung's collective unconscious and the unity of life, "black holes," the theory of chaos, "creation as good, not evil," the curse of dualistic thinking, or new terms such as biocide, geocide, or speciesism. In the final analysis, perhaps O'Murchu's work is not for scientists or theologians but for the average lay reader deeply curious about the fate of the human family and who has a notion of its infinite, divine possibilities.