The Queen of France

( 1 )

Overview

Dressed up as a queen, a little girl has some endearing and funny audiences with two most obliging subjects — her mother and father.

When Rose wakes up one morning feeling royal, she dons her necklaces, bracelets, and crown. Soon the Queen of France emerges to survey her domain, disapproving of Rose’s mother’s thorny gardening choices and asking Rose’s father where the Royal Physician may be found. The odd thing is, when Rose returns to look for the Queen of France, she’s ...

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Overview

Dressed up as a queen, a little girl has some endearing and funny audiences with two most obliging subjects — her mother and father.

When Rose wakes up one morning feeling royal, she dons her necklaces, bracelets, and crown. Soon the Queen of France emerges to survey her domain, disapproving of Rose’s mother’s thorny gardening choices and asking Rose’s father where the Royal Physician may be found. The odd thing is, when Rose returns to look for the Queen of France, she’s nowhere to be seen. And when the imperious queen comes back, she’s curious to know what Rose’s parents would think if she traded places with their little girl? With charming illustrations by Kady MacDonald Denton and a humorous tale by Tim Wadham, here is a sweet homage to the easy affection between parents and an imaginative child.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Faced with the prospect of having to pick up her messy bedroom, Rose assumes an alter ego: the Queen of France. This monarch is very fine indeed with her necklaces, bracelets, crown, parasol, and tulle skirt from "the make-believe basket," and her disdain for the common life ("I am shocked to see that you do your own cooking," the Queen of France tells Rose's mother). The Queen of France graciously offers to exchange places with Rose, but withdraws the invite when her faithful subjects express attachment to their lowly daughter ("I will miss her infinity times infinity," says Rose's mother. "That is a very large amount," says the queen). Wadham makes a terrific debut; his rhythmic prose and comic pacing feel elegant and effortless, and he handles his diminutive fantasist and her parents with the kind of unaffected empathy that can elude more experienced authors. He's also fortunate in his collaborator—Denton (A Visitor for Bear) wonderfully conveys the story's impishness, emotional subtleties, and familial affections. Just watching the queen strut her regal stuff is worth the price alone. Ages 4–8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Little girls often imagine themselves to be royalty. Young Rose wakes up one day feeling regal. After dressing herself up, including a crown, she becomes the Queen of France. After introducing herself to her mother who is out in the garden planting a rosebush, she asks where Rose is. Her mother only says that she hopes Rose cleans her room. She adds that Rose is named after that beautiful flower. When she has pricked her finger, the Queen of France asks her lawn-mowing father if he is the Royal Physician. He says he is not, but asks the queen to tell Rose that they will read a pirate story that night. After removing her finery, the queen becomes Rose again, finding a bandage, or two, for her finger. Searching for the queen again, Rose finds her room so messy that she cleans it up. Then she decks herself out again as queen, to tell her mother that she wants to change places with Rose. Reassured that all will be well, Rose is on to her next imaginative adventure. The delicate use of ink, watercolors, and gouache reinforces the positive emotions in this warm slice of family life. Rose is a charmer who assembles appropriate queenly adornments including a pink umbrella and tutu. Many vignettes depict her dressing up and royal marching. Decorative frames surround many pages. Touches of glitter enhance the jacket. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—With a few props from the make-believe basket and a royal imagination, Rose transforms into the Queen of France. She then sets out searching for Rose. (Later Rose goes in search of the Queen, but, alas, the two never meet.) The child's parents lovingly fulfill their roles, playing along and encouraging their daughter's imaginative game. When the Queen suggests that she'd like to trade places with Rose, the adults agree, but admit they would miss her terribly. Of course the Queen of France takes off her crown in the end, and Rose comes to dinner. The text is at once both quiet and lively, creating a three-dimensional character. It will read easily for the first or one hundredth time—it's a story that will never grow tired. Soft, delicate cartoons in ink, watercolor, and gouache capture the essence of Rose and her alter ego. With minimal line, the illustrator creates real, engaging characters. Several pages of text are decorated with simple frames of stars, crowns, and roses. The quiet simplicity is feminine without the frou-frou and frills. Rose will be an inspiration for many young princesses and a great character to share with small groups or one-on-one.—Carolyn Janssen, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, OH
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763641023
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 3/8/2011
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,440,571
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 400L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 10.30 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Tim Wadham is a librarian who has served on many prestigious awards committees and is also very involved in children’s theater. This is his debut picture book. He lives in St. Louis, Missouri.

Kady MacDonald Denton is the illustrator of the New York Times best-seller A Visitor for Bear and two other Bear and Mouse stories by Bonny Becker, as well as Two Homes by Claire Masurel. She lives in Ontario, Canada.

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