Queen Victoria's Gene: Haemophilia and the Royal Family

Queen Victoria's Gene: Haemophilia and the Royal Family

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by D M Potts, W T W Potts
     
 

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Queen Victoria's son, Prince Leopold, died from haemophilia, but no member of the royal family before his generation had suffered from the condition. Medically, there are only two possibilities: either one of Victoria's parents had a 1 in 50,000 random mutation, or Victoria was the illegitimate child of a haemophiliac man. However the haemophilia gene arose, it had

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Overview

Queen Victoria's son, Prince Leopold, died from haemophilia, but no member of the royal family before his generation had suffered from the condition. Medically, there are only two possibilities: either one of Victoria's parents had a 1 in 50,000 random mutation, or Victoria was the illegitimate child of a haemophiliac man. However the haemophilia gene arose, it had a profound effect on history. Two of Victoria's daughters were silent carriers who passed the disease to the Spanish and Russian royal families. The disease played a role in the origin of the Spanish Civil War; and the tsarina's concern over her only son's haemophilia led to the entry of Rasputin into the royal household, contributing directly to the Russian revolution.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780752471969
Publisher:
The History Press
Publication date:
10/21/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
239,572
File size:
897 KB

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Queen Victoria's Gene: Haemophilia and the Royal Family 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Laddiegirl More than 1 year ago
This is a really interesting and facinating book about the royal families of Europe and how the haemophilia gene got introduced into their bloodlines through Queen Victoria and eventually toppled most of the monarchies of Europe. It poses some really intriguing questions about how the gene came about and if the Duke of Kent is really Queen Victoria's father, and if not, who should really be ruling Britain today. I bought this book when it was first published in the early 2000's and I've re-read it many times since then, its a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good read overall with a fascinating and comprehensive treatment of how the transmittal of the hemophilia gene turned European history on its ear
Anonymous More than 1 year ago