Queer and Loathing: Rants and Raves of a Raging AIDS Clone

Queer and Loathing: Rants and Raves of a Raging AIDS Clone

by David B. Feinberg
     
 

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"This is as close to the truth as I can get," writes David Feinberg in what he calls his "personal Portrait of the Artist as a young Diseased Jew Fag Pariah"--a collection of autobiographical essays, gonzo journalism, and demented Feinbergian lists about AIDS activism and living, writing, and dying with AIDS.

Overview


"This is as close to the truth as I can get," writes David Feinberg in what he calls his "personal Portrait of the Artist as a young Diseased Jew Fag Pariah"--a collection of autobiographical essays, gonzo journalism, and demented Feinbergian lists about AIDS activism and living, writing, and dying with AIDS.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Novelist Feinberg (Eighty-Sixed) brings together an unsettling but frequently affecting collection of autobiographical essays and miscellaneous pieces (originally published in the Advocate, Details and other publications) about living with AIDS. Sometimes Feinberg's attempts at black humor merely confirm Edmund White's contention that joking about AIDS is to attempt in vain to domesticate it; an essay on etiquette for the HIV-positive begins, ``Avoid bleeding in public.'' Less facile are the more autobiographical pieces, complex blends of rage, despair and wit. Of his relationship with a friend who is HIV-negative, Feinberg writes, ``Sometims I feel like damaged goods. He has a fifty-year warrantee, and I'm stuck with a failed inspection slip in my shirt pocket.'' (Nov.)
Library Journal
The author of the autobiographical novels Eighty-Sixed (LJ 11/1/88) and Spontaneous Combustion (LJ 10/1/91) offers 36 essays dating from 1989 to 1994, some of which have been delivered as talks and/or appeared in such gay publications as Gay Community News, QW, Out, and the Advocate. Feinberg writes, "I would probably literally go mad if I tried to deal with AIDS at face value, without the filter of humor." His anger and impatience with hypocrisy and ignorance is palpable as he tears with biting sarcasm, bitter irony, and bitchy insight into issues of love, friendship, ACT-UP demonstrations, doctors, death, drugs, and T-cells in essays such as "Memorials from Hell," "Etiquette for the HIV-Antibody Positive," and "How To Make a Will." Vibrant and caustic, this "Eighties gonzo journalism" from a New York, Jewish, HIV-positive gay perspective is a devas- tatingly powerful personal statement.-James E. Van Buskirk, San Francisco P.L.
Whitney Scott
In his nonfiction debut, a collection of autobiographical essays chronicling their author's descent into HIV hell, Feinberg merges irreverent humor, incisive observation of all things political, and grim documentation of physical deterioration. Included with manic lists of "100 Ways You Can Fight the AIDS Crisis," "Sex Tips for Boys" and, especially touchingly, of his life regrets are notes on waiting for the end of the world, documentation of his fiendishly multiplying warts as well as diminishing T-cells (and consequent official classification as a person with AIDS), and the entry that gives the book its title, his gonzo-journalistic recollections of his part in the 1988 ACT-UP seizure of the Federal Drug Administration's headquarters. Though maybe a bit too long and tedious for some tastes, that essay establishes the book's overall tone--a compound of rage, desperation, and courage that in the piece itself resounds from a background of governmental bureaucracy and demonstrators' factionalism and in-fighting, all heavily laced with black humor. "Faced with the AIDS crisis," Feinberg writes, "sometimes one laughs to avoid crying."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101161715
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/01/1995
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
File size:
567 KB

What People are saying about this

Michael Cunningham
Horrifyingly funny, profoundly human, and truthful to the point of murder. It's not just a good book, it's an important book. I believe it will endure.
Michael Nava
A shocking and bitter book about AIDS and for that reason an essential counterweight to the sentimental bilge that characterizes so much AIDS writing. AIDS has been pretty well domesticated, safe enough for Hollywood and with its own line of Hallmark cards undoubtedly in the offing. Queer and Loathing takes all that back. There's something in it to offend just about everyone. That's its triumph.
Paul Rudnick
Fabulous and terrifying. It is required reading for President Clinton and everyone else. David B. Feinberg is an extraordinary writer; he is fearlessly truthful and heartbreaking, and he manages to be delectably funny while wrangling with activism, catheters, and rage. There is no one remotely like him; he is Lucy of Arc.

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