The Grand Slam: Bobby Jones, America, and the Story of Golf

The Grand Slam: Bobby Jones, America, and the Story of Golf

4.7 3
by Mark Frost
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

From the bestselling author of the critically acclaimed The Greatest Game Ever Played comes The Grand Slam, a riveting, in-depth look at the life and times of golf icon Bobby Jones.

In the wake of the stock market crash and the dawn of the Great Depression, a ray of light emerged from the world of sports in the summer of 1930.See more details below

Overview

From the bestselling author of the critically acclaimed The Greatest Game Ever Played comes The Grand Slam, a riveting, in-depth look at the life and times of golf icon Bobby Jones.

In the wake of the stock market crash and the dawn of the Great Depression, a ray of light emerged from the world of sports in the summer of 1930. Bobby Jones, an amateur golfer who had already won nine of the seventeen major championships he'd entered during the last seven years, mounted his final campaign against the record books. In four months, he conquered the British Amateur Championship, the British Open, the United States Open, and finally the United States Amateur Championship, an achievement so extraordinary that writers dubbed it the Grand Slam.

A natural, self-taught player, Jones made his debut at the U.S. Amateur Championship at the age of 14. But for the next seven years, Jones struggled in major championships, and not until he turned 21 in 1923 would he harness his immense talent.

What the world didn't know was that throughout his playing career the intensely private Jones had longed to retreat from fame's glaring spotlight. While the press referred to him as "a golfing machine," the strain of competition exacted a ferocious toll on his physical and emotional well-being. During the season of the Slam he constantly battled exhaustion, nearly lost his life twice, and came perilously close to a total collapse. By the time he completed his unprecedented feat, Bobby Jones was the most famous man not only in golf, but in the history of American sports. Jones followed his crowning achievement with a shocking announcement: his retirement from the game at the age of 28. His abrupt disappearance from the public eye into a closely guarded private life helped create a mythological image of this hero from the Golden Age of sports that endures to this day.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Sports Illustrated
Using his instinct for character development to delve into Jones' psyche, Frost identifies what makes Jones interesting and startlingly contemporary.
Scottish Golf Magazine
If you thought you knew the story of Bobby Jones . . ., then think again: this book is the engrossingly definitive account.
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
With clear, crisp prose Frost does a great job of bringing Jones' assault on the Grand Slam back to life.
Publishers Weekly
Before Arnold, Jack and Tiger, there was Bobby. After winning the Grand Slam of golf in 1930, Jones stood like a colossus over the American sporting scene. He is the only individual to have been recognized with two ticker tape parades down Broadway's Canyon of Heroes. Frost (The Greatest Game Ever Played) has written a swift, surefooted account of Jones's remarkable life and career. From Jones's precocious early days on the Atlanta links to his sudden retreat from the media spotlight, Frost covers every detail. The self-taught Jones began playing serious tournaments at 14 and quickly moved into the ranks of the world's best players. In 1930, he won the four major tournaments of the time: the British Amateur, the British Open, the U.S. Open and the U.S. Amateur, which sportswriters dubbed the Grand Slam. Following this success, Jones promptly retired. Later diagnosed with a rare nerve illness, he lived out his life as golf's elder statesman. While Frost's eager prose has an engaging, "you are there" quality, for nongolfers the question is whether they actually do want to be there. Frost strains to place Jones's achievement in the broader context of American history. As bedside reading for the literate duffer, this is a hole in one. For the average reader, it's a bogey. 15 b&w photos. Agent, Ed Victor. (Nov.) Forecast: The Greatest Game (2002) was praised widely, and cross-promos with the USGA and golfing events could help this new book gain traction among Frost's readers. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Decades later, the name Bobby Jones says it all: a legend. His "grand slam" (winning the Open Championship, British Amateur, U.S. Open, and U.S. Amateur) in 1930 has yet to be duplicated. Frost's current work follows his own The Greatest Game Ever Played, a historical recounting of Jones's predecessors in modern golf: Harry Vardon and Francis Ouimet. Frost does a fine job of recounting the tenor of the times-the economics (the Great Depression), baseball (Babe Ruth and the Sox and Yankees), politics, and life in general. He also chronicles the emergence of influential sportswriters. As a biography, this allows the opportunity to see a Jones with flaws: club-throwing, quick-tongued, a middling real estate salesman. At the same time, Frost shows Jones as a complex person of single-mindedness, honesty, and piety. While not the last biography of Jones, this one is very well done. Highly recommended for all sports collections.-Steven Silkunas, North Wales, PA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401381813
Publisher:
Hachette Books
Publication date:
11/01/2004
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
298,749
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >