The Question of God

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The Question of God: C.S. Lewis and Sigmund Freud Debate God, Love, Sex, and the Meaning of Life

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786190782
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/28/2003
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged, 7 CDs, 8 hrs. 30 min.
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 5.70 (h) x 1.90 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 25 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

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(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2004

    Informative

    I haven't finished yet (thus only 4 stars), but so far Nicholi's use of more than just biographies about Freud and Lewis impressed me most. Their personal letters show the real conflict between what they believed and what they taught. The arguments against Freud seemed a bit biased at times, but it was extremely refreshing to hear something other than complete praise for him. It shows the reality that even Freud found it nearly impossible to actually live life based on his philosophies, which many are still trying to do. Too many people base their lives on Freud's teachings without ever taking an intellectual look at the alternative (buying into Freud's opinion that all religion is 'fairy tales'). This book gives everyone the opportunity to make a truly informed decision, based on an observation of the teachings, lifestyles, and personal testimonies of each man.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2007

    A reviewer

    Maybe it only seems like this book is biased because Lewis was far more intelligent than Freud, and the arguments he made are just better arguments. Freud is slowly fading into obscurity in the psychological profession, and only the outrageous nature of his claims has kept him around for so long, (Ex: The Oedipus Complex)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2007

    A reviewer

    Good book for personality review of Freud and Lewis. It is also good if the reader is interested only in debating the existence of God. If however the reader is looking for answers to the question of God, they would do better to read Biblical Paradigm Shift.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2006

    Arguments to be considered

    Wether or not you agree with the authors bias toward faith, the arguments presented are ones worthy of thought. The discussions which were quoted from Freud and Lewis' own writings presented honest quandrys from their own experience and showed the divergent paths which were taken and the results of those paths. The book is curious and gives the reader pause to reconsider the path of faith.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2006

    A good read...

    Of course Freud and Lewis never debated and of course Freud never got to post a rebuttal to Lewis, but the book is still very well written. On the contrary to some other reviews, I don't find much bias in reading through this book. Both sides are presented without much opinion from the author. It's up to the reader to decide which gentlemen presents the most truth in their timeless arguments.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2005

    Dr. Nicholi is an apologist for faith based beliefs

    Absolutely and clearly biased in favor of faith. Dr. Nicholi establishes an atheist strawman out of Freud and relentlessly attacks it. While it might satisfy some deep emotional desires of Christians to watch a symbolic atheist burn in effigy, it establishes no dialogue or real examination of the differing views. I've had more balanced and rewarding conversation with a local pastor regarding religion.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2005

    This is not a debate! It is clearly one-sided,

    The book is supposed to be unbiased. However, it is completely obvious that if you are a christian, you will love this debate, and if you are an atheist, you will not. The author of this book is clearly christian. He contantly has Freud's statements on topics then C.S. Lewis' criticisms of Freud's statements on those topics. These two authors did not really live during the same period, though the author tries to say that it is possible that the two could have met once right before Freud's death. I don't think that that had happened though. C.S. Lewis obviously had the time to read Freud and his writing, and then strike it down. Would it be fair for the author to have C.S. Lewis debate a prominent atheist of today in a book? No, that debate would not be fair because the atheist of today would be able to read C.S. Lewis' writings and then criticize it all throughout the book, without having a response given by C.S. Lewis on the criticism in the process. Because the author tried to act as if he is unbiased when he is clearly not, which therefore made the book uninteresting and not debatable and equal, the book deserves a low rating.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2004

    The Question of God

    **** Not everyone can attend Harvard, but everyone can read a book that details one of the more popular courses offered there. Though a generation separated C S Lewis and Sigmund Freud, they played highly influential roles, albeit polar opposites, on the thought life of the last century. Both began as atheists, and both suffered greatly in their times, but Lewis was found by God, Freud rejected God. Thus, their views on life were the antithesis of each other, and in the contrast lies a wealth of debate for the inquiring mind. Though it begins in a rather dry fashion, once past the biographical details, it turns fascinating, especially when the author turns to questions of pain and evil. ****

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2004

    Interesting Book!

    I keep reading reviews where people say it is a little biased towards Christianity. I'm not sure I agree. I think more likely Nicholi gives a fair hearing to both sides, which often does not happen, and so it seems like he is more for Christianity than he is. My guess is he's a Christian, because not very many secular professors I know would be as fair towards Lewis's views as Nicholi was. If he happens to not be a Christian (I don't know) than I applaud him for his wonderful objectivity. Also, maybe it only seems biased because Lewis's ideas make more sense from a viewpoint of Common Sense? Anyway, Freud was also very well portrayed, but I think his life provides all bias that is needed. You'd have to be biased towards freud to make his worldview seem to work for him as well as Lewis'. Just a thought. Very good book. Everyone should read it. :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2003

    Thought provoking

    I am 15 and read this book a little while ago and it was terrific! At first I had alot of doubts bout reading it but I learned alot about C.S. Lewis and Sigmund Frued. The book dosen't reveal too much about the authors opinions, though I do agree that searching well you could tell he was a Christian. Over all this book was stupendous and I recomend it 100%!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2003

    Interesting to read

    I liked this book very much, but I recommend The Throne Room; for a clear conception on God.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2003

    Unfair Fight?

    The book is quite interesting from the standpoint that it compares the worldviews of two great, familiar minds. Problems arise, however. It becomes quickly apparent that the author is Christian. This materializes in statements along the lines of 'Freud thought so-and-so, but C.S. Lewis knew...' Also is the problem that, though Freud was a brilliant psychoanalyst, it is not fair to pit him against C.S. Lewis in philosophy. The book even includes Lewis's quote: 'when [Freud] goes on to talk general philosphy he is speaking as an amateur...I have found that when he is talking off his own subject and on a subject I do know something about...he is very ignorant.' Reading this book brings you to the general conclusion that Lewis is right, Freud is wrong. This could be for various reasons. To get a better understanding of the ideas you may just want to stick to the writings of Lewis and other philosophers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2002

    enjoyable

    The author did a decent job presenting the worldviews of the 2 great thinkers fairly. Not only did I gain a better insight about the personal lives of Lewis & Freud, but most important of all, how their worldviews had led them to take on different paths in life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2002

    Intense

    This book is an intense analysis of existentialism and religion. Does God exist? Why do we exist? The age old questions. Great read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2002

    A Thoroughly Enjoyable Read

    Few individuals have better argued, and are better remembered for, their positions on the issues of belief and non belief than the Cambridge and Oxford fantasy author Lewis, who advocated the spiritual world view, and the world renowned Vienna physician and father of psychoanalysis Freud, who advocated the secular world view. In 'The Question of God: C.S. Lewis and Sigmund Freud Debate God, Love, Sex and the Meaning of Life,' Harvard psychiatrist Armand M. Nicholi, Jr. provides the reader with an outline of more than 25 years of study, plus a popular class he has taught on the subject of Freud and Lewis. Erudite and meticulously sourced from both published and unpublished writings of the two great 20th century intellectuals, I finished the book wanting to take the author's class, or at least observe it. Nicholi images a debate between the two, although, as far as we know, the two never met or debated. After brief, introductory biographies, Nicholi compares the arguments of the two from their perspectives on the topics of God, love, sex and the meaning of life. Nicholi ends his thoroughly enjoyable book by pondering the question of whether or not Frued and Lewis ever met in person. Freud spent the last 15 months of his life in exile in England after the Nazi take over of Austria from June 1938 until his physician-assisted suicide in September 1939. Freud was reported to have been visited by an unnamed English professor. Was it C.S. Lewis? Perhaps Nicholi's next project will be to write a play about how such an imagined enounter might have transpired. I don't think the book is biased towards Lewis, as some might argue. In fairness to Nicholi, he is only presenting the reader with what the documentary record has to offer him. Said record shows a deeply pessimistic world view presented by Freud, and an optimistic world view presented by Lewis. Highly recommended.

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    Posted November 4, 2010

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    Posted December 29, 2011

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    Posted August 26, 2010

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