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Quick Fixes for Everyday Fears: A Practical Handbook to Overcoming 100 Stomach-Churning Fears
     

Quick Fixes for Everyday Fears: A Practical Handbook to Overcoming 100 Stomach-Churning Fears

by Michael Clarkson
 

We all have fears that influence our daily lives, fears that cause us to procrastinate, avoid things, miscommunicate, and prevent us from being as happy and successful as we could be. In Quick Fixes for Everyday Fears, acclaimed award-winning author and fear expert Michael Clarkson offers readers a practical handbook to overcoming one hundred stomach-churning

Overview


We all have fears that influence our daily lives, fears that cause us to procrastinate, avoid things, miscommunicate, and prevent us from being as happy and successful as we could be. In Quick Fixes for Everyday Fears, acclaimed award-winning author and fear expert Michael Clarkson offers readers a practical handbook to overcoming one hundred stomach-churning fears that can block us from maximizing our potential at work, school, home, in relationships and social settings, and on the street—everywhere fear is a factor. Clarkson provides quick, easy-to-implement solutions for a whole range of fearful situations, from public speaking, meeting deadlines, and managing problems at home to worrying about the children, handling crises in love relationships, and coping with accidents or emergencies. Filled with insight and endlessly useful, Quick Fixes for Everyday Fears is an indispensable resource for everyone in search of ways to cope with—and even thrive in—stressful or frightening situations.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
All of these books deal with that primal four-letter word, fear. Journalist Clarkson (Intelligent Fear: How To Make Fear Work for You) recognizes that emotion is essential to our survival instincts, but he also knows it can get out of hand. His cogent and convincing book presents balanced, reasonable advice for coping with 100 fears, from general stresses like romantic tiffs to specific phobias such as anthrophobia. Though Clarkson acknowledges that medical attention may be required for certain conditions like acute anxiety, he believes that much fear is either a throwback to caveman times or is learned from "things that have hurt or shaken" us; therefore, they can be conquered. Fears are topically arranged (e.g., at work, at school), each receiving a two-page discussion that includes coping strategies and tactics. Clear writing, solid references, and an attractive price make this a real bargain. (Index not seen.) Plonka, who conducts classes in the Feldenkrais Method (which uses body movement to improve self-awareness), notes that fears often fuel people's direction in life, so that they only do something "when the payoff is more valuable than comfort." Though her individual concepts are promising (e.g., we are all, to some extent, addicted to fear), her narrative as a whole is disjointed and lacks momentum. The result is an often senseless jumble: interesting mind/body exercises fail to relate back to larger concepts. One such drill pinpoints tension, then vaguely directs readers to "let that part go." Psychologist Lerner (The Dance of Anger) shrewdly characterizes fear, anxiety, and shame-termed the big three-as ubiquitous and permanent; instead of trying to make them go away, we need to embrace them warily as potentially wise guides. With characteristic intimacy, Lerner encourages a dialog of sorts with frequent, effective questions and anecdotes, filling the book with superb insights (e.g., "Women have long been shamed for growing older"). Given Lerner's reasonable approach-and the connection she fosters and sustains with readers-it is easy to forget that she offers little how-to. Instead, she illuminates the big three's impact on important areas of life like change, sex drive, rejection, and illness. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 1/03.] Although breezy and readable, the text by therapist Webb (It's Not About the Horse: It's About Overcoming Fear and Self-Doubt) relies too much on pointless, albeit heartfelt, anecdotes about conquering his own demons (i.e., a cycle of vulnerability, pain, shame, and rage) by climbing a 30-foot pole. His revelations are just too personal; he fails to explain what he has learned, which leaves readers in the dark about how to handle their own fears and makes the author appear self-congratulatory. Worse, there's not enough method to salvage the remaining material. Webb's titular five steps-e.g., acknowledge fear and self-doubt, imagine the worst-case scenario-would have been better presented in a series of articles. Pass on both Plonka's and Webb's books; instead, libraries can safely rely on Spencer Johnson's Who Moved My Cheese? and Steven Covey's Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. Clarkson is recommended for most public libraries. Demand will be deservedly high for Lerner, given her high media profile, so heads up, public libraries. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781569244623
Publisher:
Da Capo Books
Publication date:
05/10/2004
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
5.54(w) x 8.22(h) x 0.67(d)

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