Quicksand: HIV/AIDS in Our Lives

Quicksand: HIV/AIDS in Our Lives

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What is it like to be affected by HIV/AIDS? A moving first-person account offers insight — and basic facts.

ONE DAY I FOUND OUT THAT SOMEONE I KNOW — MY BROTHER-IN-LAW, JAY — HAD HIV/AIDS. AT THE MOMENT I HEARD HIS DIAGNOSIS, I REALIZED THAT I HAD STEPPED INTO THE QUICKSAND OF A NEW AND TERRIBLE WORLD — AND I WAS SINKING

Overview

What is it like to be affected by HIV/AIDS? A moving first-person account offers insight — and basic facts.

ONE DAY I FOUND OUT THAT SOMEONE I KNOW — MY BROTHER-IN-LAW, JAY — HAD HIV/AIDS. AT THE MOMENT I HEARD HIS DIAGNOSIS, I REALIZED THAT I HAD STEPPED INTO THE QUICKSAND OF A NEW AND TERRIBLE WORLD — AND I WAS SINKING FAST.

Weaving together her own story with straightforward questions and answers, the author explains the real ways that HIV/AIDS can be transmitted and explores the common experiences and emotions that might be encountered by friends and family members of someone who has the virus. She also discusses why HIV/AIDS is often still kept a secret and the importance of treating this condition like any other. With up-to-date medical information that has been thoroughly vetted by experts, this first-person narrative offers an invaluable look at what it is like to watch someone you know battle HIV/AIDS.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Sarah Sogigian
The anonymous author explains her motivation for writing this book by telling readers that ten years ago, when HIV/AIDS was still considered a taboo subject, her brother-in-law was diagnosed with the disease. She writes in a truthful, open manner, addressing common questions about HIV/AIDS and providing easy-to-understand and honest advice. Chapters follow Jay's diagnosis and treatment, and the author answers common questions that relate to each chapter. Perhaps most helpful to the young reader is that the book is not written by a doctor but by someone who has been personally affected by AIDS. The author's personal insight is what makes this book an important addition. Topics address everything from the history of HIV/ AIDS to how to protect oneself from the disease. She also provides suggestions on how to cope with hearing that a family or friend has HIV/AIDS. Perhaps the best advice is given in the chapter called Lifelines: Still Be a Friend. The author states, "If you find out that someone you know has HIV/AIDS, the first and most important thing of all is to still be a friend." The book's glossary, index, and list of Web sites for more information are extensive. The author's focus on how the disease affects all people, whether they have contracted HIV/ AIDS or not, makes this book a must-have for all teen collections. Reviewer: Sarah Sogigian
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—Respecting her family's wishes, the author chooses anonymity to recall the time 10 years earlier when her brother-in-law was diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, and she intersperses her account with questions and answers about the disease. For example, the chapter titled "False Fears" deals with her visit with Jay soon after his diagnosis. His mother had replaced the terrycloth towels in the bathroom for paper ones so that he would not have to share with anyone else. The questions that follow this particular memory deal with the many ways the virus is not spread (e.g., one cannot get HIV from saliva, tears, mosquitoes, or swimming pools). Though the book is heavier on information than personal story, the author's aim is continued awareness about the disease so that one day the stigma placed upon it will be gone. She is as adept at defining medical terms and emphasizing the need to support patients as she is at describing the emotional impact of Jay's illness on his whole family.—Joanna K. Fabicon, Los Angeles Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
Ten years ago, there was a dearth of recent books on HIV/AIDS for young people. Now, as if the disease has vanished from America, it is rare to find a book with contemporary information. This slim book fills this void with up-to-date medical information and a personal perspective offering insight into what it is like to watch someone battle with HIV/AIDS. That the author felt the need to publish anonymously is telling of the extent to which the social stigma of the disease persists. She chronicles the journey of Jay, her brother-in-law, from his diagnosis to his death, describing the emotional toll his illness and death took on family and friends and sharing practical advice on how one can remain a good friend to someone diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Interspersed throughout is current information about the virus, including origins, communicability, precautions, symptoms and treatments, with a great deal of attention to addressing the myths about how the virus is transmitted. An accessible, informative, insider's view, this book reminds readers that there is still a long way to go. (further information, glossary, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10-16)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763660697
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
11/13/2012
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
7.72(w) x 5.15(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
10 Years

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Quicksand: HIV/AIDS in Our Lives 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
QUICKSAND is a short book. But it's a book that pulls no punches and goes right to the heart of the matter: HIV/AIDS in our midst. The author, who wishes to remain anonymous, intersperses the story of her brother-in-law with straightforward and sometimes blunt information on HIV/AIDS. The book goes quickly, and provides answers to many common questions. It also gives suggestions and tips on how to interact with those infected with the virus. Though the virus has been recognized for over 20 years, and has been around longer than teenagers today, there are still many misconceptions and fears. The information shared may be difficult for some, but overall, the book provides much needed information to many that are seeking to allay their fears or just become more knowledgeable. It's worth reading just as a reminder that the virus isn't transmitted easily, and the bottom line is that it is 100% preventable.
Heidi_G More than 1 year ago
The author’s brother-in-law contracted HIV and wanted to remain anonymous when this book was being written; thus the author is listed as “Anonymous” to protect the patient’s identity.  She tells the story of learning about the diagnosis and how family and friends reacted to the news.  Her real-life situation shows the fears and lack of understanding that many people, including those around her, have with regard to HIV and AIDS.  The book is written for teens and although the topic is serious, the writing speaks well to the age group while not skirting the issues.  The glossary includes terms appropriate for the content making the book easily accessible.  At just over 100 pages, the book will not turn off teen readers looking to quickly gain information either for personal or school use.  Well done.