BN.com Gift Guide

The Quiet American (Modern Library Series)

( 27 )

Overview

The relentless struggle of the Vietminh guerrillas for independence and the futility of the French gestures of resistance become inseparably meshed with the personal and moral dilemmas of these two men and the Vietnamese woman they both love.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $63.99   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$63.99
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(297)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Hardcover New 0679600140 This is a hardcover book with dust jacket.

Ships from: Staten Island, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Sending request ...

Overview

The relentless struggle of the Vietminh guerrillas for independence and the futility of the French gestures of resistance become inseparably meshed with the personal and moral dilemmas of these two men and the Vietnamese woman they both love.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679600145
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/5/1992
  • Series: Modern Library Series
  • Edition number: 19
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 7.53 (h) x 0.79 (d)

Meet the Author

Graham Greene (1904-1991) worked as a journalist and critic, and was later employed by the foreign office. His many books include The Power and the Glory, The Third Man, Our Man in Havana, The Comedians and Travels with My Aunt. He is the subject of an acclaimed three-volume biography by Norman Sherry.

Biography

Known for his espionage thrillers set in exotic locales, Graham Greene is the writer who launched a thousand travel journalists. But although Greene produced some unabashedly commercial works -- he called them "entertainments," to distinguish them from his novels -- even his escapist fiction is rooted in the gritty realities he encountered around the globe. "Greeneland" is a place of seedy bars and strained loyalties, of moral dissolution and physical decay.

Greene spent his university years at Oxford "drunk and debt-ridden," and claimed to have played Russian roulette as an antidote to boredom. At age 21 he converted to Roman Catholicism, later saying, "I had to find a religion...to measure my evil against." His first published novel, The Man Within, did well enough to earn him an advance from his publishers, but though Greene quit his job as a Times subeditor to write full-time, his next two novels were unsuccessful. Finally, pressed for money, he set out to write a work of popular fiction. Stamboul Train (also published as The Orient Express) was the first of many commercial successes.

Throughout the 1930s, Greene wrote novels, reviewed books and movies for the Spectator, and traveled through eastern Europe, Liberia, and Mexico. One of his best-known works, Brighton Rock, was published during this time; The Power and the Glory, generally considered Greene's masterpiece, appeared in 1940. Along with The Heart of the Matter and The End of the Affair, they cemented Greene's reputation as a serious novelist -- though George Orwell complained about Greene's idea "that there is something rather distingué in being damned; Hell is a sort of high-class nightclub, entry to which is reserved for Catholics only."

During World War II, Greene was stationed in Sierra Leone, where he worked in an intelligence capacity for the British Foreign Office under Kim Philby, who later defected to the Soviet Union. After the war, Greene continued to write stories, plays, and novels, including The Quiet American, Travels with My Aunt, The Honorary Consul, and The Captain and the Enemy. For a time, he worked as a screenwriter for MGM, producing both original screenplays and scripts adapted from his fiction.

He also continued to travel, reporting from Vietnam, Haiti, and Panama, among other places, and he became a vocal critic of U.S. foreign policy in Central America. Some biographers have suggested that his friendships with Communist leaders were a ploy, and that he was secretly gathering intelligence for the British government. The more common view is that Greene's leftist leanings were part of his lifelong sympathy with the world's underdogs -- what John Updike called his "will to compassion, an ideal communism even more Christian than Communist. Its unit is the individual, not any class."

But if Greene's politics were sometimes difficult to decipher, his stature as a novelist has seldom been in doubt, in spite of the light fiction he produced. Kingsley Amis, Evelyn Waugh, and R. K. Narayan paid tribute to his work, and William Golding prophesied: "He will be read and remembered as the ultimate chronicler of twentieth-century man's consciousness and anxiety."

Good To Know

Greene's philandering ways were legendary; he frequently visited prostitutes and had several mistresses, including Catherine Walston, who converted to Catholicism after reading The Power and the Glory and wrote to Greene asking him to be her godfather. After a brief period of correspondence, the two met, and their relationship inspired Greene's novel The End of the Affair.

Greene was a film critic, screenwriter, and avid moviegoer, and critics have sometimes praised the cinematic quality of his style. His most famous screenplay was The Third Man, which he cowrote with director Carol Reed. Recently, new film adaptations have been made of Greene's novels The End of the Affair and The Quiet American. Greene's work has also formed the basis for an opera: Our Man in Havana, composed by Malcolm Williamson.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Henry Graham Greene (birth name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 2, 1904
    2. Place of Birth:
      Berkhamsted, England
    1. Date of Death:
      April 3, 1991
    2. Place of Death:
      Vevey, Switzerland

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 27 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(18)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2005

    anything but quiet

    i read this book without expecting to be pulled into the book. the narrative slowly won me over and i found myself in the middle of rice fields with the characters of the book! i feel as though i were in vietnam, walking the streets, sitting in the restaurants, having a drink with fowler and pyle. more than anything i feel as though i had entered into the mind of fowler and experienced what he was experiencing. this book transported me to another world, another time and another life. i highly recommend this book. it's not a fast paced book but one worth reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2004

    It quietly gets under your skin

    One hopes that the excellent movie (and Michael Caine's well-publicized efforts to get it released after the studio went week in the knees) will bring a wave of new readers to Graham Greene -- one of the greatest novelists of his generation. A former spy who never managed to curb his wanderlust, Greene has set his novels in every corner of the world, favoring authenticity and characterization over trite blockbuster action. For anyone interested in literary craftsmanship and/or international affairs, his books are indispensable. The Quiet American, one of his stronger efforts, is a good place to start -- but not to stop.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2003

    Masterful Storytelling

    It's not just the story, but how Graham Greene weaves his words. The story is masterfully told; the characters are shaped with care. It's simply one of the greatest stories I've read, on the same level of James Hilton's Lost Horizon in the realms of storytelling. The plot is superbly crafted and Greene makes it so you really care what happens despite the character's flaws; a skill which many contemporary authors seem to lack.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 10, 2013

    What I most respect Graham Greene for is his complex views on se

    What I most respect Graham Greene for is his complex views on sexual relationships. There is none of the screaming drama found in modern writing. No one stomps off in a fit of wall punching, or turns to ridiculous mind games. In The Quiet American, the young and idealist Pyle tells the jaded married British Fowler that he is in love with his mistress. They go on to have an adult friendship despite contending for the same woman. It is so refreshing to read. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 23, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Clairvoyant

    This is a wonderfully crafted story of a cynical British foreign correspondent covering the French Indochinese war and a gung-ho, innocent American who works for the US economic mission. Both want the same girl. While the love triangle holds the story together, Greene paints an uncomfortable portrait of American foreign policy at the beginning of the Cold War and is frighteningly clairvoyant as to future American involvement in Vietnam. The book also has much to say about journalistic neutrality.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 26, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Atmospheric and poignant

    A classic and for good reason, the novel tells one perspective of the story of the beginnings of American involvement in Vietnam prior to what is now referred to as the Vietnam War, during the 1950's when it was still a French colony. Fowler is a well crafted character, as is Pyle to a lesser extent, though I agree with many critics that Phuong's character is too childish and simplistic and Greene perpetrates the same degree of "othering" that many of his peers do in this kind of writing. Still, it's a well told story, there's a great sense of tension and sense of place, and a good starting point for looking at this not-told-nearly-enough story of the US/Vietnam relationship.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2006

    Innocence=Ignorance

    Greene's novel was meant to shock and offend. He novelized the terrifying consequences of American geopolitical innocence. it should be read by intelligent and open minded people, and not the weak minded who see things only on one dimension.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2005

    filthy awful book

    Sweat, grease, muss, filth, dirt, rage, passificity, and all of the general nastiments comprise Graham Greene¿s The Quiet American. Mr. Bailey has kept to his long and unfortunate habit of assigning this novel to his AP Literature/ CC Composition and English 4 classes, and I have been the forced recipient for two years running. Graham Greene copies far to closely the elaborate disgust which society, in his view, leaches onto the world¿s innocent. Innocent, meaning foreign or disabled. I may safely say that this book easily tops my list of least favorites, seconded only by every John Steinbeck novel ever written. The plot of The Quiet American centers around a somewhat greasy older European war correspondent and his vies for his frail and infantile Vietnamese mistress. Keep in mind the novel takes place just as the Americans began to enter Vietnam. Unfortunately for the slovenly Fowler, the new American aid worker, Pyle, has amorous intentions for the waifish foreign child. The remaining portions of the novel center around the typical love triangle in all books that feature an incoherent writer. The Quiet American When the novel was first published in the 1950¿s it was Don¿t be fooled by The Quiet Americans pseudo-profound nature, it is simply a sad recount of the world¿s attempts to gain control of Indo-China.

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2001

    The fall of idealism

    This book is so hard hitting on the idealism of the American's during the French war in Vietnam (1950-'54). It gives you a look at the Vietnamese people and their country. The book is all about the outsiders view of the people and the politics Vietnam. In war your have to pick a side to stay human.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2001

    Make Love Not War

    For anyone who wondered where the Vietnam War protest slogan, 'Make Love Not War' came from, The Quiet American offers an explanation. Here an American operative (Pyle) helps engineer the exit of the French from Vietnam to make way for the 'Third Force' paving the way for a U.S. role. He does his part by planting Bicycle Bombs. Although this is a fictional novel, the bicycle bombs are historical. Some believe that so too, is Pyle, The Quiet American, who may be a composite that includes (Major-General) Ed Landsdale, then a gosh-golly gee whiz lad from Boston who guided the Diem regime in Vietnam until his assassination in 1963. Greene portrays Pyle as the insensitive architect of chaos and bloodshed, who is oblivious of the destruction of his actions. He is often wide-eyed and earnest to the point of insanity and this painfully embodies something of the general American disposition in Vietnam at the time. But like Fowler, the aging British journalist, who reflects the fading power of European colonialism, and Phong, the young, beautiful woman both men desire, who is Vietnam, Greene paints all these characters with such depth that the surface story of human entanglements and moral dilemmas could stand alone without knowledge of their historical allegories.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2000

    An excellent tale of love and romance in 1950s Vietnam, but so much more

    On the surface, this is a tale of a 'love triangle' of sorts among Fowler (a British correspondent), Pyle (the American operative), and Phuong (the Vietnamese girl whom they both desire), and in itself, this superficial story is interesting. However, it goes deeper. In the characters, one can see the traits of nations, of a United States imposing its cultural and values on an unwilling people. And Fowler, who claims he is not involved in the conflict, is actually deeply engaged. This paints an interesting and accurate portrait of Vietnam at the very beginning of US involvement, which about ten years later would turn into full-scale military involvement.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)