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The Quilt Story
     

The Quilt Story

4.4 5
by Tony Johnston, Tomie dePaola (Illustrator)
 

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After a move to a new home, comfort comes from a surprising place.

Long ago, a young girl named Abigail put her beloved patchwork quilt in the attic. Generations later, another young girl discovers the quilt and makes it her own, relying on its warmth to help her feel secure in a new home.

Overview

After a move to a new home, comfort comes from a surprising place.

Long ago, a young girl named Abigail put her beloved patchwork quilt in the attic. Generations later, another young girl discovers the quilt and makes it her own, relying on its warmth to help her feel secure in a new home.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A quilt that provides warmth, fun, and comfort to two different generations is the star of this rich picture book. . . dePaola provides a warm, dignified interpretation of Johnston's story." --Booklist, starred review

"A lovely collaboration of artist and author. . . A treasure." --Children's Book Review Service

Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
Any child with a special blanket will enjoy this story about a little pioneer girl who takes her quilt, stitched in a design of falling stars, across the country to a new home. In this home, in a different era, the quilt is found by another little girl and comforts this girl as she journeys to a new home - not by covered wagon, but by moving van. Illustrator dePaola's primary colors and stylized figures capture well the folklife quality of the story.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780698113688
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
06/28/1996
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
177,302
Product dimensions:
8.03(w) x 10.15(h) x 0.16(d)
Lexile:
AD400L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"A quilt that provides warmth, fun, and comfort to two different generations is the star of this rich picture book. . . dePaola provides a warm, dignified interpretation of Johnston's story." —Booklist, starred review

"A lovely collaboration of artist and author. . . A treasure." —Children's Book Review Service

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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The Quilt Story 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
OCD_Student More than 1 year ago
I loved this story as a kid, and still do... What I love most, is how the quilt finds itself loved through out its age and history, what became forgoten long ago in an atic becomes found again by another young girl, persumably 100 years later.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I got this book for my nieces. I liked the pictures because I have always loved Tomie DePaola books, like Strega Nona, etc. The pictures in this book are cute and it's a cute story about a little girl and her quilt. But the story line is totally confusing if you're looking for something to make 100% sense, because the little girl lives in a covered wagon-setting on the prairie, and the quilt gets put away and then suddenly it's modern times with tractor-trailers and the quilt has been eaten by mice in the attic and the little girl's mother repairs it. I know it's just a children's story but there could have been some kind of explanation that the quilt now belonged to the granddaughter or something of the original girl. The author left that part out. So it just seems disjointed. I know, I know, I'm being too picky. But overall it is a worthwhile read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite books. I love the way Tomie dePaola uses hundreds of subtle visual clues to enrich and explain Tony Johnston's simple, rhythmic narrative. Kids will be quick to notice the details and should be encouraged to make observations as they read the story. Smart parents and educators will take the time to ask questions on each page: 'What changes do you notice here? How is this room (these people, their clothes, her eye color, the quilt colors) the same or different? How are these people related? How do we know that time is going by?' From the many visual clues, the true story emerges, and its perennial beauty is likely to bring tears to one's eyes. The Quilt Story is a treasure.