Quilting - Just a Little Bit Crazy: A Marriage of Traditional & Crazy Quilting

Quilting - Just a Little Bit Crazy: A Marriage of Traditional & Crazy Quilting

by Allie Aller, Valerie Bothell
     
 

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Cross traditional crazy quilting with favorite pieced quilt patterns and today’s machine quilting methods, and what do you get? Crazy fun for all kinds of quilters, even those who don’t like handwork. Allie Aller and Valerie Bothell’s guide offers an exuberant mixture of vintage and modern, hand and machine work, and clever ways to make

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Overview

Cross traditional crazy quilting with favorite pieced quilt patterns and today’s machine quilting methods, and what do you get? Crazy fun for all kinds of quilters, even those who don’t like handwork. Allie Aller and Valerie Bothell’s guide offers an exuberant mixture of vintage and modern, hand and machine work, and clever ways to make traditional quilts a little crazy. Includes 10 projects in sizes from small wall hangings to bed quilts; photo instructions for 15 crazy quilt and silk ribbon embroidery stitches; and tips for combining crazy quilting with machine piecing and embroidery.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
02/17/2014
Aller (Allie Aller’s Crazy Quilting), a Washington state quilter, and Bothell, a Kansas crazy-quilting teacher, endeavor to marry old traditions of crazy quilting with today’s technology “to show that crazy quilts can be functional.” The result is a smashing success with equal parts fun and function, serious instruction, and delighted execution. Techniques outnumber projects three to one. In other words, Aller and Bothell put most of their energy on the how versus the what. Preceding the projects are general instructions: for piecing, including crazy-quilt blocks and borders and Judith Baker Montano’s fan methods; for appliquéing using freezer-paper or card stock templates; and for interfacing, which is especially important on wall hangings. After pieces become blocks, embroidery begins, whether by hand or machine. The authors offer ideas on designs and transfers; on needles, tension, and thread weight; and on stitches, from feather to Cretan to blanket. To illustrate the construction, they pull from the 10 projects (some with patterns), including Bothell’s “Oriental Garden” and Aller’s “Morning Chores” with its dairy feed sack center. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
Aller (Allie Aller’s Crazy Quilting), a Washington state quilter, and Bothell, a Kansas crazy-quilting teacher, endeavor to marry old traditions of crazy quilting with today’s technology “to show that crazy quilts can be functional.” The result is a smashing success with equal parts fun and function, serious instruction, and delighted execution. Techniques outnumber projects three to one. In other words, Aller and Bothell put most of their energy on the how versus the what. Preceding the projects are general instructions: for piecing, including crazy-quilt blocks and borders and Judith Baker Montano’s fan methods; for appliquéing using freezer-paper or card stock templates; and for interfacing, which is especially important on wall hangings. After pieces become blocks, embroidery begins, whether by hand or machine. The authors offer ideas on designs and transfers; on needles, tension, and thread weight; and on stitches, from feather to Cretan to blanket. To illustrate the construction, they pull from the 10 projects (some with patterns), including Bothell’s “Oriental Garden” and Aller’s “Morning Chores” with its dairy feed sack center.
--Publishers Weekly; 2/17/14

2/17/14
Aller (Allie Aller’s Crazy Quilting), a Washington state quilter, and Bothell, a Kansas crazy-quilting teacher, endeavor to marry old traditions of crazy quilting with today’s technology “to show that crazy quilts can be functional.” The result is a smashing success with equal parts fun and function, serious instruction, and delighted execution. Techniques outnumber projects three to one. In other words, Aller and Bothell put most of their energy on the how versus the what. Preceding the projects are general instructions: for piecing, including crazy-quilt blocks and borders and Judith Baker Montano’s fan methods; for appliquéing using freezer-paper or card stock templates; and for interfacing, which is especially important on wall hangings. After pieces become blocks, embroidery begins, whether by hand or machine. The authors offer ideas on designs and transfers; on needles, tension, and thread weight; and on stitches, from feather to Cretan to blanket. To illustrate the construction, they pull from the 10 projects (some with patterns), including Bothell’s “Oriental Garden” and Aller’s “Morning Chores” with its dairy feed sack center.

June 2014 Quilter's Digest
If you combine traditional quilting, crazy quilting, some favorite pieced quilt patterns and today’s machine-quilting methods, you get crazy fun, even if you don’t like handwork. The authors offer you clever ways to make traditional quilts a little bit crazier. Photo instructions are included for 15 crazy quilt and silk ribbon embroidery stitches, plus lots more.
July/August 2014 The Applique Society Newsletter
If you have ever wanted to make a crazy quilt but did not know where to start I would like to recommend this book. Quilting...just a little bit crazy. The authors, Allie Aller and Valerie Bothell, join forces and share their skills and knowledge to create 10 projects that vary in size from small wall-hangings to large quilts. You will start by learning how to create crazy quilt blocks. Some of the techniques used include freezer paper template appliqué, free-form appliqué, flip and sew, Montano piecing methods and crazy piecing long borders. There is a good discussion on assembling your blocks into a quilt top using some not so traditional methods. The rest of the book is devoted to finishing techniques, stitching and embellishing. Each author brings her own unique perspective and you will find yourself excited to try some of the methods presented. Val loves hand embroidery and she also shares hints on stitching with silk ribbon. Allie delves into the world of machine embroidery by combining stitches from your machine along with hand embroidery and embellishment. There are photo instructions for 15 crazy quilt and silk ribbon embroidery stitches. You will also learn new ways to layer, quilt and bind crazy quilts.
November/December 2014 Machine Quilting Unlimited
Allie and Valerie effectively combine their expertise to provide the reader with a wonderful foundation for constructing crazy quilts. A variety of techniques for piecing and appliquéing blocks are included, as well as innovative and complete instructions on stitching and embellishing by hand or machine. Ten projects are included to get you started on creating a crazy quilt of your own.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781607057710
Publisher:
C & T Publishing
Publication date:
05/01/2014
Pages:
120
Sales rank:
723,490
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.40(d)

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