Quit You Like Men, A Book For Young Men

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Excerpt from book:
EMIGRATION. I Have always been favourably disposed towards emigration. With the enormous growth of our population, increasing by 300,000 every year, and the consequent over-doing of many vocations, I think it at once the only ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
EMIGRATION. I Have always been favourably disposed towards emigration. With the enormous growth of our population, increasing by 300,000 every year, and the consequent over-doing of many vocations, I think it at once the only safety valve as regards our own efforts, and the bountiful provision of a superintending Providence, that we should have lands in various parts of the world waiting for the energy and enterprise of the British people. It is a painful fact that a single advertisement in a newspaper for a clerk, or any service where mere school knowledge and not skilled labour knowledge is required, oftentimes brings hundreds of replies from a great variety of persons—men who have failed in business—others who have never made a start—some wanting to better themselves—others merely wanting to add to a slender private income—some from one reason, some from another; but most because they have no special knowledge of anything. This is a large class, and its very existence proves the evil of a system which is increasing. Many of the persons referred to have received what is called a liberal education, and it is no uncommon thing for one who has had the advantage of an university education to be seeking an appointment which could equally as well be filled byone educated at a Board School. A professional man has a large family, and is living up to his income, including the education of his children—and his children's portion is the education he has allowed them; asthey arrive at ages when they have to make a self- provision, they aim at keeping up an appearance not inferior in respectability to the class amongst whom they have been accustomed to move; and as they cannot all have openings in a profession, some have to be content with a clerkship, which has no promise of anything...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217979658
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 8/18/2009
  • Pages: 28
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.06 (d)

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EMIGRATION. I Have always been favourably disposed towards emigration. With the enormous growth of our population, increasing by 300,000 every year, and the consequent over-doing of many vocations, I think it at once the only safety valve as regards our own efforts, and the bountiful provision of a superintending Providence, that we should have lands in various parts of the world waiting for the energy and enterprise of the British people. It is a painful fact that a single advertisement in a newspaper for a clerk, or any service where mere school knowledge and not skilled labour knowledge is required, oftentimes brings hundreds of replies from a great variety of persons—men who have failed in business—others who have never made a start—some wanting to better themselves—others merely wanting to add to a slender private income—some from one reason, some from another; but most because they have no special knowledge of anything. This is a large class, and its very existence proves the evil of a system which is increasing. Many of the persons referred to have received what is called a liberal education, and it is no uncommon thing for one who has had the advantage of an university education to be seeking an appointment which could equally as well be filled byone educated at a Board School. A professional man has a large family, and is living up to his income, including the education of his children—and his children's portion is the education he has allowed them; as they arrive at ages when they have to make a self- provision, they aim at keeping up an appearance not inferior in respectability to the class amongst whom they have been accustomed to move; andas they cannot all have openings in a profession, some have to be content with a clerkship, which has no promise of anything...
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