×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Quo Vadis (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)
     

Quo Vadis (Barnes & Noble Digital Library)

3.9 56
by Henryk Sienkiewicz
 

See All Formats & Editions


This edition includes a modern introduction and a list of suggested further reading.

Quo Vadis is a powerful historical novel about the rise of Christianity in the Roman Empire. Through a romance between a high-born Roman pagan and a Christian woman, Henryk Sienkiewicz masterfully brings to life the decadence of imperial Rome during the

Overview


This edition includes a modern introduction and a list of suggested further reading.

Quo Vadis is a powerful historical novel about the rise of Christianity in the Roman Empire. Through a romance between a high-born Roman pagan and a Christian woman, Henryk Sienkiewicz masterfully brings to life the decadence of imperial Rome during the reign of Nero Claudius Caesar (AD 54-68), the bloodthirsty persecutor of the early Christians.

Quo Vadis has been translated into more than forty languages, as well as adapted into several movies. Jeremiah Curtin's accurate and lively English translation of the novel successfully conveys Sienkiewicz's muted portrayal of the beginnings of Christianity and his spectacular, apocalyptic vision of the Roman Empire in decline.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411466586
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
03/13/2012
Series:
Barnes & Noble Digital Library
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
560
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author



Born in Poland in 1846 and educated in Warsaw, Henryk Sienkiewicz published his first literary works in 1872. Sienkiewicz was also a successful journalist, a social and political activist, and a Polish patriot. After his wife died from tuberculosis, Sienkiewicz established a foundation and an artists' fund that was devoted to helping artists and writers suffering from the disease. But Sienkiewicz also wrote novels, short stories, and essays while abroad, and many of his works were inspired by his travels. He was furthermore very active politically, writing protests against the policies of Prussia and Russia toward Poland. Sienkiewicz was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1905. He spent his final years in Switzerland, where he continued to work on behalf of the Polish people, co-organizing the Swiss central committee of an organization devoted to helping Polish victims of World War I. He died in Switzerland in 1916.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Quo Vadis (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 56 reviews.
Swiderek More than 1 year ago
This book is historical fiction with many true characters and events in it. In a way it is "religious" and there is nothing wrong with that. The read is long, but the writing takes off about 100 pages into the novel. It starts slow and builds as the characters are being developed. Anyone who likes Steven Pressfield or Michael Curtis Ford's novels on the Ancient World will see this book as the "original" historical novel, for it was the first. A great read that keeps ones involved. And Jerimiah Curtin's translation of Sienkiewicz's writing doesn't miss a beat. Now I see why B&N has listed Quo Vadis as one in their "Library of Essential Reading" series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read that huge honkin book in two days it was so awesome. I CRIED, and I don't cry easily. I never thought I would love a character in a book as much as Edward Cullen from Twilight, but Marcus Vinitius comes seriously close!!! He's so freakin awesome!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Billy Joe Sizemore More than 1 year ago
I am a ardent atheist. This is still one of my favorite novels. It is the story of one mans willingness to discover hisself. I have loved this book for twenty years! I read it probaly once a year. Enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Magnificent story telling within accurate historical context. Excellent analysis of characters and description of place and facts, It fascinated me, inspired me and simply could not put the book down. Thoroughly enjoyed the unabridged edition.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have never been able to fully read this story, but it's really good so far. Very interesting. It's amazing how much faith one girl had in God!
quox More than 1 year ago
...but not only. I feel this book has stengthened by resolve. The story told here is so powerful. This is story telling at its best. But in the end, and most of all, it brings you closer to God. :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A vey well written book that is hard put down. It is a beautiful story set in ancient Rome with suspense, love, wonderful imagery and a powerful story. It has to be one of the top novels ever written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read!
Eowyn24 More than 1 year ago
This is one of the those books that will stick with you for a long time. I found it hard to read in the sense that it was so disturbing. What these early Christians went through for thier faith during this time was absolutely monstrous! I was glued to this one, yet the harsh reality of it was painful to read at times.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the second version of Quo Vadis? (Lord, where are you going?), and is a powerful telling of the early Christian martyrs. The Latin names are a bit tough at first, but this modern English translation brings the story to life. And it's all here: a tale of love and lust, power, brutality, compassion and sacrifice, set against the insane Nero's persecution of the early Church. Not only could I not put it down (and it's no bit of fluffy reading), but I went right back in and read it again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
font is extremely small and there are wide margins, so font could have been easily bigger. I would not buy this book, if I had known the type was so tiny. Almost returned; however, didn't want the hassle.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Will always remain my #1 book! I recommend it to everyone!
SearchingforGoodBooks More than 1 year ago
I read a lot. Some of my favorite novels are The Count of Monte Cristo, Lord of The Rings, and David Copperfield. I stumbled on to this book after reading a profile of the late author, Henryk Sienkiewicz, in World Magazine. It soon became my favorite novel. It is powerful, stirring, and inspiring. Nero is shown in all his disgusting glory, a pre-Hitler Hitler, concerned only with his ego. There is an amazing love story, and even two apostles from the Bible make it into the book. I could not recommend a better book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Surprize endings
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Look for the free version of this book with "Narrative" in the title. It has very few errors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This version is not good. The first few pages do not display the full scanned page. The rest of the book has wrongly typed words with symbols instead of letters. I was highly disappointed. I prefer Barns and Noble service over Amazon as NOOKstudy made me fan of B&N. So, I wanted the B&N free version instead of the Amazon Kindle's version. Kindle's free version is much much better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago