Quoting God: How Media Shape Ideas about Religion and Culture

Overview


Quoting God charts the many ways in which media reports religion news, how media uses the quoted word to describe lived faith, and how media itself influences--and is influenced by--religion in the public square. The volume intentionally brings together the work of academics, who study religion as a crucial factor in the construction of identity, and the work of professional journalists, who regularly report on religion in an age of instant and competitive news. This book clearly demonstrates that the ...
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Overview


Quoting God charts the many ways in which media reports religion news, how media uses the quoted word to describe lived faith, and how media itself influences--and is influenced by--religion in the public square. The volume intentionally brings together the work of academics, who study religion as a crucial factor in the construction of identity, and the work of professional journalists, who regularly report on religion in an age of instant and competitive news. This book clearly demonstrates that the relationship between media culture and spiritual culture is foundational and multi-directional; that the relationship between news values and religion in political life is influential; and that the relationship among modernity, belief, and journalism is pivotal.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The essays in this book each make a unique contribution on a subject must discussed but little understood.

-Michael Cromartie, Ethics and Public Policy Center, Washington

Publishers Weekly
Billed as an examination of world religions' influence on culture and the media's impact on religions, this collection also illustrates the worldview behind mainstream journalism. Eleven chapters, each by a different journalist or scholar, relate case studies, essays and personal life. Subjects range from the exotic (the Falun Gong) to the familiar (science and religion). Two treatments-one of the press's role in Arab nations, and the other of Muslim identity in American media-illuminate today's headlines. In the foreword, prominent religion reporter John Dart defines secular news organizations as "religiously neutral" and religion scholars as "nonpartisan," which some readers may dispute. The book hits occasional sour notes, such as conflating Jehovah's Witnesses with Christian fundamentalists and harshly critiquing President Bush's public expressions of faith. But there are strong contributions; Paul Boyer's essay on biblical prophecy and foreign policy points out the potential complications of having a premillennial dispensationalist in the White House, and Richard Gardner builds a case for "complicated and ambiguous narratives" in the reportage of the 1995 Aum Shinrikyo sarin gas attack in Japan while linking coverage of the story with Japan's history and mores. This anthology will find its biggest audience in journalism classes, but it also can help the average reader understand the pitfalls and possibilities of religion reporting. (Jan.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781932792065
  • Publisher: Baylor University Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/2005
  • Pages: 334
  • Product dimensions: 0.75 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author


Claire Hoertz Badaracco (Ph. D. Rutgers) is Full Professor in the College of Communication, Marquette University. She is the editor of Quoting God: How Media Shape Ideas about Religion and Culture (Baylor University Press, 2005), Trading Words: Poetry, Typography, and Illustrated Books in the Modern Literary Economy (1995) and American Culture and the Marketplace (1992).
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Table of Contents

Foreword
Introduction : quotation and the life of public texts 1
1 Journalism and the religious imagination 21
Radio in Tibet : a portable window on the sacred 37
2 God talk in the public square 43
Law and the Middle East media : between censorship and independence 59
3 The First Amendment and the Falun Gong 67
First Amendment and the common good 79
4 A framework for understanding fundamentalism 87
Modernity and fundamentalism in Mongolia 101
5 Biblical prophecy and foreign policy 107
Post-9/11 media and Muslim identity in American media 123
6 Last words : death and public self-expression 129
Comedy and death in media space 143
7 Collective memory, national identity : victims and victimizers in Japan 153
Religious contradiction and the Japanese soul 173
8 Appalachian regional identity in national media 181
The reporter as participant-observer 193
9 The Virgin of Guadalupe as cultural icon 201
Desert religions 209
10 Reporting complexity : science and religion 211
Fairness and pressure advocacy in controversial science 225
11 Vatican opinion on modern communication 233
Mocha and meditation mats 247
Conclusion : a relationship of overlapping conversations 259
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