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A Rabbi Talks with Jesus / Edition 1
     

A Rabbi Talks with Jesus / Edition 1

5.0 2
by Jacob Neusner, Donald Harman Akenson
 

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ISBN-10: 0773520465

ISBN-13: 9780773520462

Pub. Date: 02/16/2000

Publisher: McGill-Queens University Press

Placing himself within the context of the Gospel of Matthew, Neusner imagines himself in a dialogue with Jesus of Nazareth and pays him the supreme Judaic gesture of respect: making a connection with him through an honest debate about the nature of God's One Truth. Neusner explains why the Sermon on the Mount would not have convinced him to follow Jesus and why

Overview

Placing himself within the context of the Gospel of Matthew, Neusner imagines himself in a dialogue with Jesus of Nazareth and pays him the supreme Judaic gesture of respect: making a connection with him through an honest debate about the nature of God's One Truth. Neusner explains why the Sermon on the Mount would not have convinced him to follow Jesus and why, by the criterion of the Torah of Moses, he would have continued to follow the teachings of Moses. He explores the reasons Christians believe in Jesus Christ and the Kingdom of Heaven, while Jews continue to believe in the Torah of Moses and a kingdom of priests and holy people on earth. This revised and expanded edition, with a foreword by Donald Akenson, creates a thoughtful and accessible context for discussion of the most fundamental question of why Christians and Jews believe what they believe.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780773520462
Publisher:
McGill-Queens University Press
Publication date:
02/16/2000
Edition description:
REVISED
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
495,621
Product dimensions:
(w) x (h) x 0.60(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsix
Forewordxi
1Come, Let Us Reason Together3
2A Practicing Jew in Dialogue with Jesus18
3Not to Destroy but to Fulfill vs You Have Heard That It Was Said, But I Say to You35
4Honor Your Father and Your Mother vs Do Not Think That I have Come to Bring Peace on Earth53
5Remember the Sabbath Day to Keep It Holy vs Look, Your Disciples Are Doing What Is Not Lawful to Do on the Sabbath73
6You Shall Be Holy; for I the Lord Your God Am Holy vs If You Would Be Perfect Go, Sell All You Have and Come, Follow Me89
7You Shall Be Holy vs Holier than Thou111
8The Road from Capernaum127
9You Shall Tithe All the Yield of Your Seed vs You Tithe Mint and Dill and Cumin and Have Neglected the Weightier Matters of the Law134
10How Much Torah, After All?151

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A Rabbi Talks with Jesus 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
RCK More than 1 year ago
Jacaob Nuesner imaginges himself to be one of the many Jews who came to listen to Matthew's Jesus in the 1st century. His thesis can be summed up in two statements. 1) I went to hear Jesus. Did he take anything away from the Torah? No. Did he add anything? Yes, himself. 2) Why he would not have followed Jesus. Nuesner does a wonderful job in highlighting various parts of the text where Jesus implies his divinity, that I as a gentile Christian would have missed. He comes to two conclusions. The first, which he wants to ask a disciple of Jesus, is, does your master mean to say that he is God? To which I want to reply yes, he is God! Unfortunately, Nuesner raises the question, but does not pursue it. The second is that Jesus' teaching, or torah, does not include anything on village or family life, i.e., how one should live in the context of a local community. For him, Jesus' torah is too individualistic. Also for Nuesner the Law of Moses is eternal. From these two things, Jesus' torah is too individualistic and the Law of Moses is eternal, he argues his conclusion that Jesus can not be the Christ and therefore, he would not have followed Jesus. This is a good beginning to a respectful dialogue between Jews and Christians. But any serious dialogue has to eventually confront the question of the divinity of Jesus. Rabbi Nuesner does a wonderful job in showing how Matthew's Jesus made a claim to divinity, a claim, I would argue, the historical Jesus also made. The next step is for both sides to listen respectfully to each other's answer to the question is Jesus God, why or why not.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago