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Rabbit Ears

( 2 )

Overview

Hopscotch is a very particular rabbit. He knows what he likes and what he does not like. And most of all, he does not like washing his ears!
But when his older cousin comes to visit, he doesn't flinch when it's time to get his ears washed. Could it be that big rabbits wash their own ears?
This adorable story about growing up will reassure parents and reluctant ear-washers everywhere.

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Overview

Hopscotch is a very particular rabbit. He knows what he likes and what he does not like. And most of all, he does not like washing his ears!
But when his older cousin comes to visit, he doesn't flinch when it's time to get his ears washed. Could it be that big rabbits wash their own ears?
This adorable story about growing up will reassure parents and reluctant ear-washers everywhere.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The characters are funny, adorable, and expressive. . . . A good book for sharing.” —School Library Journal

“Few preschoolers will not be able to find a kindred spirit in this little bunny.” —Kirkus Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Like all preschoolers, Hopscotch the rabbit is confident of his likes and dislikes, and "the thing he did not like the most was... having his ears washed." Then he discovers his cool older cousin Bobtail not only doesn't mind ear washing, he even does the job himself. "Big rabbits wash their own ears," Hopscotch realizes. And if he can prove he's big, Hopscotch further reasons (correctly, as it turns out), his parents might just let him spend the night at Bobtail's house. Newcomer Stewart and Rankin (The Handmade Alphabet) give their hero a strong motive and make him a good model for nudging along children's autonomy, and the two illustrations depicting Hopscotch's revelation have a nice sense of comic drama, especially when Hopscotch first spots Bobtail's scrubbing out of the corner of his eye. Although the anthropomorphized domestic scenes seem rather tame, they are sunny, and the message of independence will be well received by newly independent youngsters. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This instructive picture book tells the story of a young rabbit, Hopscotch, who does not like having his ears washed. Hopscotch likes chocolate cake, his stuffed bunny, Rabbity, and building block towers. Nevertheless, he does not like getting cold, wet paws, or eating lumpy pudding, and he especially does not like getting his ears washed. The text focuses on the lessons to be learned from bigger bunnies; in this case, Hopscotch's older cousin Bobtail provides the paradigm. Bobtail demonstrates the benefits of being an older bunny, and then reveals by his example that older bunnies wash their own ears. Fortunately, Rankin's charming illustrations provide a welcome relief from the heavy didacticism of the text, with her adorable pictures of Hopscotch and his family. The illustrations flow nicely with the text, sometimes appearing with multiple pictures on one page; other pages show the text below or in the middle of the frame with the illustration. Warm colors and lightly drawn outlines make the pictures inviting, ultimately making this book enjoyable to read. 2006, Bloomsbury Publishing, Ages 3 to 7.
—Laura Ruttig
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1-Hopscotch hates to have his ears cleaned. To avoid it, the little rabbit covers his head with a saucepan, upside-down pants, and oven mitts-and, on one occasion, just runs away. Some parents may squirm at the way his mom begs and even bribes her child; they may also blink at how easily the youngster comes around as he follows his older cousin's example and eventually performs the task himself. Although the text is sometimes wordy, it lends itself well to reading aloud, with plenty of potential (including silly song lyrics) for hamming it up. Rankin's acrylic inks and paints have a watercolor gentleness combined with concentrated tints. The characters are funny, adorable, and expressive. Children can look at the pictures over and over and keep finding more enchanting details. A good book for sharing, with a childlike protagonist and a satisfying ending.-Susan Weitz, formerly at Spencer-Van Etten School District, Spencer, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Sometimes all it takes is the example of someone slightly older to encourage children to try new things. Hopscotch knows he likes chocolate cake, his stuffed bunny, Rabbity, and building tall towers with his blocks. He also knows what he doesn't like and at the top of that list is having his ears washed. His mother tries encouraging, pleading, even tricking, but only a visit from his older cousin, Bobtail, helps to change his mind. Wanting to be old enough to spend the night at Bobtail's house, Hopscotch decides to follow his lead and try washing his own ears. To his surprise it's not nearly as bad as he had thought. Illustrations rendered in bright acrylics feature the endearing rabbit eating with chocolate-covered whiskers; playing make-believe in the garden; and fussing in the bathtub. Few preschoolers will not be able to find a kindred spirit in this little bunny. (Picture book. 4-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781599907406
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 2/14/2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 739,530
  • Age range: 3 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.50 (w) x 10.60 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Amber Stewart is the editorial director for a children's publisher in the UK. She lives in London.

Laura Rankin has illustrated several picture books, including The Wriggly, Wriggly Baby and The Handmade Alphabet, which won a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor. She lives in rural Maine.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 25, 2014

    This is a great little book about those seemingly small issues t

    This is a great little book about those seemingly small issues that can be a really big struggle for some kids. My son HATES getting his hair washed and really loves this book because he's just like the main character. I love how the book shows how gentle and patient the parents are until the child's discomfort finally resolves itself. A great little book, well written and well illustrated.

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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    SOGGY EARS AND SLIPPERY SOAP

    Young rabbits are irresistible, even those with less than salutary characteristics such as Hopscotch. He's appealing, however (and that's a large however) he is also very particular. For a young fellow he has definite likes and dislikes. In his preference category we find his toy, Rabbity, building block towers and chocolate cake. On his don't-care-for-at-all list are bedtime, cold wet paws.....and at the very top of his dislikes is having his ears washed. After all, soap made him sneeze and when his ears were wet they dripped. So, this was something to be avoided at all costs. When his mother finally coaxed him into the tub he hold onto his ears 'very, very tightly.' No amount of trickery or bribery would make him let go of those ears. One day Hopscotch's older cousin, Bobtail, came for a visit. After a day of play and a hearty dinner, it was bath time. Hopscotch was amazed to see Bobtail washing his own ears. Sometimes all it takes is a good example for a finicky young rabbit to change his mind. 'Rabbit Ears' holds a lesson for all youngsters who don't relish bath time. Laura Rankin's amusing acrylic ink and paint illustrations add humor to this story of a small rabbit who wants to grow up. - Gail Cooke

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