Rabbit Hill

( 17 )

Overview

It has been a while since Folks lived in the Big House, and an even longer time has passed since there has been a garden at the House. All the animals of the Hill are very excited about the new Folks moving in, and they wonder how things are going to change. It’s only a matter of time before the animals of the Hill find out just who is moving in, and they may be a little bit surprised when they do.

New folks are coming to live in the Big House. The animals of Rabbit...

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Overview

It has been a while since Folks lived in the Big House, and an even longer time has passed since there has been a garden at the House. All the animals of the Hill are very excited about the new Folks moving in, and they wonder how things are going to change. It’s only a matter of time before the animals of the Hill find out just who is moving in, and they may be a little bit surprised when they do.

New folks are coming to live in the Big House. The animals of Rabbit Hill wonder if they will plant a garden and thus be good providers.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Naomi Williamson
There is excitement in the air when the animals hear that new people will be moving into the big house. It has been empty for some time and there has been no one to plant a garden. Without the garden many of the animals are having trouble finding food. In this classic award winning story the characters will warm the hearts of readers as the different animals share stories about life on Rabbit Hill. They talk about the good people and those who were "mean, shiftless and inconsiderate." Curiosity is rampant as the animals wonder what kind of people will be living in the house. Will they be kind and good people, will they bring a dog, and will they have a garden? When the big day arrives and moving vans come up the driveway, all of the animals are there for the big occasion. The reader can feel the animals holding their breath as the car with the new owners pulls in; the ageless illustrations provide this same suspense. Young readers will be delighted with these whimsical characters as they go about their daily lives, learning more about the new people who will have such an impact on the animals' lives. From Little Georgie Rabbit and Willie Fieldmouse, to pessimistic Uncle Analdas, the animals learn to trust the new people as adventure after adventure follows.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140310108
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 1/28/1977
  • Series: Newbery Library, Puffin Series
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 158,704
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 1050L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.74 (w) x 10.88 (h) x 0.34 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Lawson (1892-1957) received his art training at the New York School of Fine and Applied Arts. His favorite medium, pen and ink, is used expressively and with detail in his black and white illustrations in The Story of Ferdinand (by Munro Leaf). In addition to illustrating many children's books, including Mr. Popper's Penguins, Robert Lawson also wrote and illustrated a number of his own books for children. In 1940, he was awarded the Caldecott Medal for his picture book illustrations in They Were Strong and Good and in 1944, he was awarded the Newbery Medal for his middle grade novel Rabbit Hill.

Robert Lawson (1892-1957) received his art training at the New York School of Fine and Applied Arts. His favorite medium, pen and ink, is used expressively and with detail in his black and white illustrations in The Story of Ferdinand (by Munro Leaf). In addition to illustrating many children's books, including Mr. Popper's Penguins, Robert Lawson also wrote and illustrated a number of his own books for children. In 1940, he was awarded the Caldecott Medal for his picture book illustrations in They Were Strong and Good and in 1944, he was awarded the Newbery Medal for his middle grade novel Rabbit Hill.

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Table of Contents

1. New Folks Coming 11
2. Mother Worries 27
3. Little Georgie Sings a Song 35
4. Uncle Analdas 51
5. Porkey Sits Tight 61
6. Moving Vans 69
7. Reading Rots the Mind 75
8. Willie's Bad Night 87
9. Dividing Night 95
10. Clouds Over the Hill 103
11. Strain and Strife 111
12. There Is Enough for All 119
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 25, 2013

    A timeless piece of woodland animal fiction. One of the cutest s

    A timeless piece of woodland animal fiction. One of the cutest stories I've read in a long time. Combine heartfelt emotions with humorous antics and little furry creatures... and then you'll have "Rabbit Hill".

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  • Posted January 21, 2013

    A lot of animals live on Rabbit Hill in rural Connecticut outsid

    A lot of animals live on Rabbit Hill in rural Connecticut outside of Danbury. They include Father and Mother Rabbit, their son little Georgie, Porkey the Woodchuck, the Gray Fox, the Gray Squirrel, Willie Fieldmouse, Mole, Phewie the Skunk, the Red Buck, and many others. Over three years ago, good Folks lived in the house, the lawns were thick, the fields were covered with clover, and the gardens were full of vegetables. Then evil days fell on the Hill when the good Folks moved away and their successors were mean, shiftless, and inconsiderate. Last autumn, even they left, and the house had stood empty since then.

    However, now little Georgie comes running with some good news. “New Folks Coming!” He even makes up a song about it to sing while going up Danbury way to fetch Uncle Analdas. But will the New Folks be planting people who will provide a good garden that will bring better times to the Hill, or will they have guns and traps and poisons with vicious dogs and nasty cats? And when little Georgie gets hit on the Black Road by a car, what will the New Folks do? This delightful story for younger readers won the Newbery Medal in 1945. Uncle Analdas uses some “countrified” euphemisms such as “tarnation,” “gumdinged,” and especially “dingblasted.” Also there are a few occurrences of pipe smoking and one reference to elderflower wine.

    I can understand how some modern kids whose highest notion of “good reading” is junk like Harry Potter or A Series of Unfortunate Events would find Rabbit Hill “boring.” However, for those who like to savor truly fine children’s literature with charming characterizations and lovely illustrations, it is a heart-warming and beautiful tale that deserved the Newbery Award. Of course, that was back in the days before the leftists took over the American Library Association. One person noted that the book, apparently based upon the actual hill on which author Robert Lawson lived, is “a powerful reminder that we are stewards of God's creation,” and another pointed out the clear message about being kind to our fellow creatures.

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  • Posted December 1, 2010

    rabbithill

    Rabbit hill is a book that is funny and scary. It is one of those books that will keep you on the edge of your seat waiting to see what happens next. In this book there is humor and anger. There are also a variety of characters and animals. Some animals are clever, some are funny, and some are mean. In this book the animals are very curious on how the new neighbors that just moved in. The animals are very curious and afraid because the previous people who lived in the house where bad they brought traps and poisons. If you like fables with many animals this is a good book for you. It is because it is filled with humor and a crazy journey to get some food. In the book you find out what kind of people the new neighbors they really are. In this book the leaders of the animals are the rabbits that are very clever and devise a plan to get food. I think it was an interesting book because the animals fight back to make sure they are safe from all of the new things they have to adjust to. Rabbit Hill is one of those books that you do not really hear about. It may be recommended or a friend might tell you about and if you do hear about it I would suggest reading it. Just by reading rabbit hill I can predict that other books written by Robert Lawson would be very interesting and funny books. Also as you get farther into the book you meet new characters that add more to the book in a good way. Finally I would say that Rabbit Hill would be a good book to read if you like funny animal books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2007

    A reviewer

    Rabbit Hill is a 128pg book with 12 chapters by Robert Lawson. The mine characters are Little Georgie, Mother, Father, and the New Folks. Little Georgie is a Little bunny. Mother is Little Georgie's mom. Father is Little Georgie's dad. The New Folks are a family of humans. All the animals are worried that the New Folks have cats, dogs, traps, guns to go hunting with, and most of all children. Little Georgie is so excited that the New Folks are coming that he starts to sing a song he made up. It went like this: 'New Folks coming oh my New Folks coming oh my New Folks coming oh my oh my oh my.' The main idea of Rabbit Hill is the New Folks coming,and how all the animals are worried that they have pets, hunting tools and most of all children. The storys' setting is in a meddow. I absolutely loved this story becuase it was a fast and easy read for a sixth grader. I personaly can connect to Rabbit Hill by being worried that the new neighbors would be weird or unfriendly. Everyone should read Rabbit Hill!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2007

    Dad, reader and writer

    This is a wonderful book! I write about rabbits and wildlife and this story is great. I actually have a very old copy dated 1944 and I envy Robert Lawson's writing as well as his illustrations. He certainly deserved what he won for this book!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2007

    Rabbit Hill

    ¿Rabbit Hill¿ by Robert Lawson was published in 1944, and it won the Newbery Medal award in 1945. Lawson was born on October 4, 1892 in New York City and passed away on May 27, 1957 in Westport, Connecticut. Not only was Lawson an author, but he was also an illustrator and commercial artist. He grew up in Montclair, New Jersey and although he had no ambition to write or draw when he was younger, he entered New York School of Fine and Applied Art after he graduated from high school and studied illustration for three years. ¿Rabbit Hill¿ is about a family of rabbits and other small animals that live on a hill where the big house stands. For many years, a family of good folks lived in this big house and they respected the small animals. The good folks shared their hill with the animals, and they were planting folks, which served as a food source for the animals. The children of the family often played tag with the animals in the evenings, and the family dog even saved and raised a lost fox cub. The small animals had it made, but it came to an end when the good folks moved away. Hard times feel upon the hill and ¿sumac, bayberry, and poison ivy had taken over the fields, the lawns had gone crab grass and weeds, and there was no garden.¿ The house was left abandoned for years and the small animals were forced to get their food from the ¿Fat-Man-at-the-Crossroads garden. This was a dangerous task because the animals had to deal with the man, his dogs, and they had to cross the black road twice a day to get there. The small animals had wondered for quite some time if they would ever get such good folks again, for their food was scarce and they were hungry. At last, there is good news for the small animals, ¿new Folks are coming.¿ Every animal is wondering what kind of new folks are going to be living in the big house. What kind of folks will they be? Planter, mean, nice, who knows! You will have to read to find out. This books genre is Fantasy Fiction. This is a wonderful book, and it was definitely a page-turner due to all the excitement within the book. Although some words are quite challenging for the recommended age range, it is still a delightful and recommendable book, especially for animal lovers. The style of writing is significant, and the plot is, overall, outstanding. This book, without a doubt, deserved its Newbery Medal award. The age range for this book is 5 to 9, reading level six. Lawson, Robert. Rabbit Hill. New York: The Viking Press, 1944.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2007

    An exciting, adventurous, and suspenseful book!!

    I think this book was a good one. Rabbit Hill is for kids of all ages! If you like fictional and animal books, then you should read this! Well, what are you waiting for?! Go and get the book while you can! Remember, it is a good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2006

    Wonerful Story for all ages

    Robert Lawson¿s book, Rabbit Hill is full of excitement and energy it is a delightful and charming story. It captured the meaning of family. I would definitely recommend this story. It is suitable for children of all ages. The Hill is full of excitement, there are new folks moving in. The animals are hoping that the new folks will grow a garden, so they can provide food for their families. The house has been empty for a long time and life has been difficult on the hill. Food is scarce and the animals worry that they will not survive another season.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2006

    kids have it hard enough

    I thought the words were very difficult for a child at 8 yeard old this was the touhest time explaining the every other word to heard this was very frustrating but if not forthat it was a very good book it had alot of excitement in it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2006

    worth it to use a dictionary

    What has happened in our society to NOT want to challenge a child while reading this book or any book aloud?? Doesn't anyone want to challenge their children anymore?? This book is absolutely wonderful!!!!!!!!!!!! It's perfectly ok to stop every once in awhile to explain,and discuss vocabulary. That's how kids learn. We need to quit trying to make everything sooo easy for kids,and teach our children that if you don't know a word , look it up,and discuss it. People tell me they are amazed by my own children's use of vocabulary. Could it be because I've challenged them from day one??? It's good for children to be challenged , parents!!! This is a delightful story that can be enjoyed by all ages,and it's worth it to read aloud,and to do the explaining!!! Let's put this book back on the shelf in our libraries,and let's challenge our children!!! I remember having this book read aloud to me in 5th grade,and the teacher did ask us questions. I also remember my own parents challenging me with challenging reading. Parents you are responsible for your children's education too. Get used to it , folks! Stop passing the buck to schools,and read to your kids ,and challenge them. Nobody ever said life was suppose to always be 'easy'. We must do a better job preparing our children for life, folks.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2006

    Have a dictionary handy

    Rabbit Hill is a pleasant story about the animals' points of view when new people move into the neighborhood. The disappointment comes from needing a dictionary often. In regards to age level, vocabulary should match the story and illustrations. Words like impertinent, adjacent, and prodigious are very nice words, but is a young child going to be impressed. Maybe disappointed, I was. By the time a child is able to understand those nice words, he or she will be too old for the story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2005

    Cute

    I tried to read it to my 6y son and 8y daughter, it was very cute and the illustrations were were wonderful, but it used too many 'big words' that my kids had a hard time understanding. I kept stopping every couple of paragraphs to explain to them what was going on. So, we stopped reading it, I'm sure we will try again in a year or two.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2005

    Charming!

    Adorable! Sweet! Great for animal lovers, especially my friend, who loved The Tale of Desperaux!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2004

    Wonderful

    This book was so sweet. I can't describle it. My favourite part was when the animals are shown the statue of St. Francis. Read this! PS.My pet bunny is named Georgie; named for the main character.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2002

    THIS BOOK IS THE BEST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    This is a very interesting book that I enjoyed very much.Iwould recommend this book for all ages.It deserved it's Newberry Award.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2001

    For animal lovers

    My mother bought this book for my son and he loves it! He takes it with him to school and reads it on the bus. actually, he takes it everywhere he goes! I read a chapter to him every night, along with our cat, who sits beside me and listens...I'm not kidding! I couldn't wait to see what happens at the end, so I read the whole book when we got it...my son doesn't know this...shhh! Rabbit Hill is a wonderful book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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