Race, Racism, And American Law, Sixth Edition / Edition 6

Hardcover (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$33.50
(Save 83%)
Est. Return Date: 10/29/2014
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $79.95
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 59%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $79.95   
  • New (4) from $199.22   
  • Used (3) from $79.95   

Overview

The Sixth Edition of this innovative text written by Derrick Bell continues to provide students with insight into the issues surrounding race in America and an understanding of how the law interprets those issues as well as the factors that directly and indirectly influence the law. The first casebook published specifically for teaching race related law courses, Race, Racism, and American Law is engaging, offering hard-hitting enlightenment, and is an unparalleled teaching tool.

Among the features that have made this text a success with both students and instructors through five editions over 35 years:

• Clear and readable text along with a participatory approach that encourages discussion of unresolved and perhaps unresolvable racial issues.
Interdisciplinary excerpts from historical, sociological, and psychological publications that provide comprehensive coverage of all aspects of the subject and in this edition pose the question of the law’s limitations in remedying current racial barriers.
• Creative hypothetical exercises for possible briefing and argument to the class by student advocates. The presentations promote a learning by teaching experience that enables students to realize the complex nature and consequences of racism in the United States
• Commentary on the Supreme Court's conception of a "color-blind" society and its adverse effects on school desegregation, voting, employment, and affirmative action
• Alternatives to integration in achieving the goal of equal educational opportunity.
• The absence or inadequacy of remedies for racial barriers facing Latino, Asian and Native American citizens.
• Discussion of Professor Lani Guinier's advocacy of proportional representation over majority-minority districts.
• The uses of nooses as racial intimidation symbols replacing flaming crosses.
• Racial priorities in Hurricane Katrina’s rescue and recovery policies.
• The legal ramifications of the disproportionately high percentage of blacks and Hispanics in American prisons
• Legal and social barriers to blacks and Latinos seeking to challenge employment discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended.
• The growing acceptance and continued hostility to interracial sex and marriage.
• The vulnerability of black and Latino buyers to consumer schemes and sub-prime mortgages.
• The limited value of racial protests during a time of war and national crisis.

Fully updated, the Sixth Edition includes:

• Increased citation to and discussion of law review articles that offer new and perhaps controversial perspectives, which Professor Bell utilizes to provide divergent views and thus better provoke class discussion and independent student thought
• Summaries of new Supreme Court cases
• A new hypothetical problem that deals with using non-racial criteria to create school diversity
• New sections on the adverse impact of immigration on black employment and the impact of unemployment on prison rates

Race, Racism, and American Law, Sixth Edition, compiled and published initially in 1973 by Derrick Bell, in this latest addition continues its position as an essential tool to any course addressing the reasons why race remains a key to America’s economic, political and social functioning. If you aren’t already using this text, request an examination copy today.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735575745
  • Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
  • Publication date: 7/23/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 794
  • Product dimensions: 10.20 (w) x 7.30 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Derrick Bell
Derrick Bell
A foremost legal and social thinker, Derrick Bell began challenging conventions with his now classic text Race, Racism and American Law. In his fictional allegorical stories and stimulating essays, Bell explores the fault lines in our social fabric and ways to repair them.

Biography

Renowned as the professor who gave up his tenured position at the Harvard Law School in protest of the university's lack of minority women faculty members, Derrick Bell is also an innovative, insightful and unorthodox scholar and writer. Bell, now a professor at New York University's School of Law, helped pioneer a new style of narrative scholarship, mixing allegory and anecdote together with analysis and fact.

Bell was born in 1930 in Pittsburgh, where he was the first member of his family to go to college. After serving in the U.S. Air Force in Korea, he entered the University of Pittsburgh Law School with the goal of becoming a civil rights lawyer. He began his legal career at the Justice Department, then was recruited by Thurgood Marshall to join the Legal Defense and Education Fund of the NAACP. In 1971, Bell became the first black tenured professor at Harvard Law School.

Bell published Race, Racism and American Law, now a standard law school text, in 1973. Its critique of traditional civil rights legislation helped spark the academic movement toward critical race theory, in which scholars such as Richard Delgado, Kimberle Crenshaw and Kendall Thomas sought new paradigms for understanding and addressing racial injustice. The book's fourth edition appeared in 2000.

As a writer, Bell is best known for his series of books featuring the fictional civil rights leader Geneva Crenshaw. The books, which include And We Are Not Saved, Faces at the Bottom of the Well, Gospel Choirs, and Afrolantica Legacies, interweave fables and philosophical dialogues with Bell's analyses of legal history. "I suppose there would be a problem if everyone wrote about race in the Derrick Bell style," Jeremy Waldron wrote in a New York Times review of Gospel Choirs. "We need analysis and we need social science as much as dream, dialogue and narrative. But we would certainly be the poorer if no one wrote like this; for even to be disconcerted by Mr. Bell's technique is to open oneself to the challenge of his thesis and the soaring power of the music that sustains it."

At the age of 70, after a lifetime of passionate commitment to social justice, Bell wrote Ethical Ambition: Living a Life of Meaning and Worth. The book draws on the lives of role models like Martin Luther King, Jr., Paul Robeson, and Medgar Evers, as well as on Bell's own life, to explore what it means to live and work with integrity, dignity and compassion. "We live in a system that espouses merit, equality, and a level playing field, but exalts those with wealth, power, and celebrity, however gained," Bell writes. His own accomplishments are an inspiration to the brave souls willing to buck that system.

Good To Know

Bell gave up his tenured position at Harvard Law School in 1992, when he refused to return from the two-year, unpaid leave of absence he took to protest the school's failure to hire and tenure minority women.

Bell had launched a similar protest before, while serving as dean of the Oregon Law School. He resigned his Oregon position in 1985 after the faculty directed that he not extend an offer to an Asian-American faculty candidate who was third on the list for a faculty position. When the top two candidates (both white males) declined the position, the law faculty decided to reopen the search rather than hire the Asian-American woman.

In 1994, the story "Space Traders" from Bell's book Faces at the Bottom of the Well was made into an HBO movie starring Robert Guillaume.

President Barack Obama was a student of Bell's at Harvard Law School.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. American Racism and the Relevance of Law
Chapter 2. Race and American History
Chapter 3. The Quest for Effective Schools
Chapter 4. Fair employment Laws and Their Limits
Chapter 5. Discrimination in the Administration of Justice
Chapter 6. Voting Rights and Democratic Domination.
Chapter 7. Property Barriers and Fair Housing Laws
Chapter 8. Interracial Intimate Relationships and Racial Identification
Chapter 9. Public Facilities: Symbols of Subordination
Chapter 10. The Parameters of Racial Protest
Chapter 11. Racism and Other “Nonwhites”

Table of Cases
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)