Rachel and Leah (Women of Genesis Series #3)

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Overview

Leah was so young when her sister Rachel was born that she could not remember a time when Rachel was not the darling of the family- pretty, clever, and cute, whereas Leah plugged along being obedient, hard-working, and responsible. Then one day a good-looking marriageable kinsman named Jacob showed up, looking for a haven from his brother's rage, and Leah fell in love at once. It didn't surprise her at all that Jacob saw only Rachel. But surely, as the two sisters worked and lived alongside Jacob for seven years,...

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Rachel and Leah: Women of Genesis

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Overview

Leah was so young when her sister Rachel was born that she could not remember a time when Rachel was not the darling of the family- pretty, clever, and cute, whereas Leah plugged along being obedient, hard-working, and responsible. Then one day a good-looking marriageable kinsman named Jacob showed up, looking for a haven from his brother's rage, and Leah fell in love at once. It didn't surprise her at all that Jacob saw only Rachel. But surely, as the two sisters worked and lived alongside Jacob for seven years, he would come to realize that Leah was the one he ought to marry...

 

Author’s Bio

Orson Scott Card, an internationally acclaimed writer, is the author of Ender's Game, The Tales of Alvin Maker, and two novels in the Women of Genesis collection, Sarah and Rebekah, as well as many other novels, stories, essays, and plays.  He is the first author to win both the prestigious Hugo and Nebula awards for best novel two years in a row.  Scott and his wife, Kristine, are the parents of five children and live in Greensboro, North Carolina.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This series is definitely for those interested in women in the Bible, and in such novels as The Red Tent."--Kliatt
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590385029
  • Publisher: Shadow Mountain Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/15/2005
  • Series: Women of Genesis Series , #3
  • Format: CD
  • Pages: 9
  • Sales rank: 1,418,550
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 5.60 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Orson Scott Card

Orson Scott Card is the author of the novels Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow, and Speaker for the Dead. Ender’s Game and Speaker for the Dead both won Hugo and Nebula Awards, making Card the only author to win these two top prizes in consecutive years. There are seven other novels to date in The Ender Universe series. Card has also written fantasy: The Tales of Alvin Maker is a series of fantasy novels set in frontier America; his most recent novel, The Lost Gate, is a contemporary magical fantasy. Card has written many other stand-alone sf and fantasy novels, as well as movie tie-ins and games, and publishes an internet-based science fiction and fantasy magazine, Orson Scott Card’s Intergalactic Medicine Show.  Card was born in Washington and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, Card directs plays and teaches writing and literature at Southern Virginia University. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card, and youngest daughter, Zina Margaret.

Biography

Any discussion of Orson Scott Card's work must necessarily begin with religion. A devout Mormon, Card believes in imparting moral lessons through his fiction, a stance that sometimes creates controversy on both sides of the fence. Some Mormons have objected to the violence in his books as being antithetical to the Mormon message, while his conservative political activism has gotten him into hot water with liberal readers.

Whether you agree with his personal views or not, Card's fiction can be enjoyed on many different levels. And with the amount of work he's produced, there is something to fit the tastes of readers of all ages and stripes. Averaging two novels a year since 1979, Card has also managed to find the time to write hundreds of audio plays and short stories, several stage plays, a television series concept, and a screenplay of his classic novel Ender's Game. In addition to his science fiction and fantasy novels, he has also written contemporary fiction, religious, and nonfiction works.

Card's novel that has arguably had the biggest impact is 1985's Hugo and Nebula award-winner Ender's Game. Ender's Game introduced readers to Andrew "Ender" Wiggin, a young genius faced with the task of saving the Earth. Ender's Game is that rare work of fiction that strikes a chord with adults and young adult readers alike. The sequel, Speaker for the Dead, also won the Hugo and Nebula awards, making Card the only author in history to win both prestigious science-fiction awards two years in a row.

In 2000, Card returned to Ender's world with a "parallel" novel called Ender's Shadow. Ender's Shadow retells the events of Ender's Game from the perspective of Julian "Bean" Delphinki, Ender's second-in-command. As Sam to Ender's Frodo, Bean is doomed to be remembered as an also-ran next to the legendary protagonist of the earlier novel. In many ways, Bean is a more complex and intriguing character than the preternaturally brilliant Ender, and his alternate take on the events of Ender's Game provide an intriguing counterpoint to fans of the original series.

In addition to moral issues, a strong sense of family pervades Card's work. Card is a devoted family man and father to five (!) children. In the age of dysfunctional family literature, Card bristles at the suggestion that a positive home life is uninteresting. "How do you keep ‘good parents' from being boring?" he once said. "Well, in truth, the real problem is, how do you keep bad parents from being boring? I've seen the same bad parents in so many books and movies that I'm tired of them."

Critical appreciation for Card's work often points to the intriguing plotlines and deft characterizations that are on display in Card's most accomplished novels. Card developed the ability to write believable characters and page-turning plots as a college theater student. To this day, when he writes, Card always thinks of the audience first. "It's the best training in the world for a writer, to have a live audience," he says. "I'm constantly shaping the story so the audience will know why they should care about what's going on."

Card brought Bean back in 2005 for the fourth and final novel in the Shadow series: Shadow of the Giant. The novel presented some difficulty for the writer. Characters who were relatively unimportant when the series began had moved to the forefront, and as a result, Card knew that the ending he had originally envisioned would not be enough to satisfy the series' fans.

Although the Ender and Shadow series deal with politics, Card likes to keep his personal political opinions out of his fiction. He tries to present the governments of futuristic Earth as realistically as possible without drawing direct analogies to our current political climate. This distance that Card maintains between the real world and his fictional worlds helps give his novels a lasting and universal appeal.

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    1. Hometown:
      Greensboro, North Carolina
    1. Date of Birth:
      August 24, 1951
    2. Place of Birth:
      Richland, Washington
    1. Education:
      B.A. in theater, Brigham Young University, 1975; M.A. in English, University of Utah, 1981
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent Bible Tale

    Card has a special flair for bringing lesser known bible tales to life in a compelling manner. This is one of those tales. The grandson of Abraham & Sarah (Jacob) travels to a relative's camp (Laban) to find a bride. He is promised by Laban that if he works for seven years, that he can marry Laban's youngest daughter Rachel. Jacob agrees and then needs somebody to copy the holy books of Abraham that he carries.

    Jacob is assigned Bilhah, the handmaiden of Laban's older daughter Leah. Bilhah is a young woman who was robbed of her inherited dowery by an unscrupulous cousin who was indentured to Laban. With no place to go and no money, she ended up living in Laban's camp. Leah has difficulty with her sight (probably just severly near-sighted) which makes it difficult for her father to find a husband for her. Also, she has a very "bitter" personality because of this which does not help matters.

    Leah becomes interested in Jacob's holy books and joins Bilhah and Jacob in reading and discussing the holy books. Little by little the words of the books creep in to Leah's soul making her a less bitter. With Leah's love of the books, it becomes obvious that she has more in common with Jacob than Leah, who spends her days attending the herds.

    To say more, would spoil the ending for those not familiar with it. I really enjoyed this tale and look forward to the next book in the series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2006

    Can it be?....

    I have not finish the book yet.... I just finished 'In the Shadow of the Ark' by Anne Provoost, and when I went to put the book away, I noticed that both covers had the same picture... now, you might be thinking so what? But I am into these books, this time in history, and I hate to think the author did not research his cover a little better... Is Rachel the same as ReJana from the Ark or if you research a little more.. the same as 'Flaming June' Just disappointed.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2006

    Awesome

    Just as its predessors, it had me on the first page. Card does an amazing job of recreating the world these women lived in. He gives each of these women believable personalities that the reader falls in love with.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2006

    Well worth the wait!

    I have waited and searched for this book ever since reading the first two novels in the series and I have not been disappointed. The tale is crafted beautifully and no word is wasted. Definitily a book that you cannot put down once you pick it up.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2004

    Enchantingly Beautiful

    Although this biblical story of Rachel and Leah never fails to interest me in pretty much any form I have to say that Mr. Card has written a masterpiece. I am not the most religious of people but after reading this book I was inspired. I have read the three books that are in this series but if you have not read the previous books Sarah and Rebekah it doesn't affect your complete understanding of this book. I strongly recommend all three books. In this novel betrayal, love, religion, and intense characterizations are skillfully combined to make the famous Rachel and Leah, wives of the prophet Jacob, seem like our own friends. Mr. Card shows Jacob's humanity and creates an ancient world and a different kind of lifestyle that captures its readers until they are no longer readers but the people in that world, alongside the beautiful Rachel, the tender-eyed Leah, the orphan Bilhah, the seductress Zilpah, and the prophet of God: Jacob, whom all of these women will come to love.

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    Posted February 23, 2009

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    Posted September 2, 2013

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    Posted January 28, 2011

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    Posted October 12, 2012

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