Racism Explained to My Daughter by Tahar Ben Jelloun, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Racism Explained to My Daughter

Racism Explained to My Daughter

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
     
 
In the tradition of Marion Wright Edelman's "The Measure of Our Success," a best-selling author speaks frankly with his daughter about racism. A runaway best-seller in Europe, Tahar Ben Jelloun's Racism Explained to My Daughter has been translated into more than a dozen languages and sold more than 300,000 copies. Writing in response to his ten-year-old daughter's

Overview

In the tradition of Marion Wright Edelman's "The Measure of Our Success," a best-selling author speaks frankly with his daughter about racism. A runaway best-seller in Europe, Tahar Ben Jelloun's Racism Explained to My Daughter has been translated into more than a dozen languages and sold more than 300,000 copies. Writing in response to his ten-year-old daughter's questions about racism, the prize-winning author has created a unique and compelling dialogue, speaking to racism as a problem not only in France, but around the world. Elegant and sensitive, "deceptively simple" (New York Times), Racism Explained to My Daughter is for all parents who have struggled to engage their children in discussion of this complex issue. It also includes personal essays from four leading U.S. writers who are also parents.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
If its success in Europe is any indication, this book should be a best seller in America. Attempting to explain racism is challenging enough, and it is even harder when one is explaining it to a child. Prize-winning author Ben Jelloun (Corruption, New Pr., 1995) meets the challenge, as Bill Cosby acknowledges in his introduction. Written in question-and-answer format--his daughter's questions, Ben Jelloun's answers--the book is appropriately brief. The author does not consider his words final, and so the four responses, from William Ayers, Lisa Delpit, David Mura, and Patricia Williams, parents and writers all, are important in continuing the discussion and applying it to the American scene. The book is easy to read and provocative, touching on discrimination, religion, genetics, stereotyping, immigration, xenophobia, and more. Rare should be the library that does not have it.--John Moryl, Yeshiva Univ. Lib., New York Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
A translation of French novelist, poet, and critic Tahar Ben Jelloun's dialogue with his 10 year-old daughter in which he explains racism. Includes essays by Williams Ayers, Lisa D. Delpit, David Mura, and Patricia Williams, as well as an introduction by Bill Cosby. 5.7.5<">. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565845343
Publisher:
New Press, The
Publication date:
06/28/1999
Pages:
207
Product dimensions:
5.29(w) x 7.56(h) x 0.84(d)

Meet the Author

Winner of the 2004 IMPAC Prize, the 1994 Prix Maghreb, and the 1987 Prix Goncourt, Moroccan-born Tahar Ben Jelloun emigrated to France in 1961. His novels include the Prix Goncourt-winning The Sacred Night, Corruption, and This Blinding Absence of Light (IMPAC Prize, 2004). He is a regular contributor to Le Monde, La Repubblica, El País, and Panorama. Carol Volk translated Ben Jelloun's novel Corruption. She lives in Washington, D.C.

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