Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States

Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States

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by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
     
 

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In the first edition of this best-selling book Eduardo Bonilla-Silva documented how beneath the rhetorical maze of contemporary racial discourse lies a full-blown arsenal of arguments, phrases, and stories that whites use to account for-and ultimately justify-racial inequities. In the second edition the author explored the growing Hispanic-speaking minority and the

Overview

In the first edition of this best-selling book Eduardo Bonilla-Silva documented how beneath the rhetorical maze of contemporary racial discourse lies a full-blown arsenal of arguments, phrases, and stories that whites use to account for-and ultimately justify-racial inequities. In the second edition the author explored the growing Hispanic-speaking minority and the implications for racial stratification.

In this third edition, the author continues to challenge color-blind thinking. A new chapter on Obama's election addresses the apparent miracle of a black man elected as the 44th President of the nation despite the fact that racial progress has stagnated since the 1980s and, in some areas, even regressed. In contrast to those who believe the election of President Obama is a watershed moment that signifies the beginning of a postracial era in America, the author suggests this development embodies the racial trends of the past forty years. Bonilla-Silva analyzes two of these trends: the rise of color-blind racism as the dominant racial ideology and the emergence ot an apparently more flexible racial stratification system similar to the one found in Latin America. Racism without Racists will continue to challenge students and lead to much class discussion.

Editorial Reviews

Choice
This excellent book—suggested for more than just social scientists—is one of the few that provides ammunition for those who are seriously interested in breaking away from nonproductive discussions of race and ethnic relations. This is a must-read for all. Essential.
Mary Romero
The book challenges the students to rethink dominant paradigms on race in the U.S., but [they] respond extremely well to it. The new chapter is very engaging.
Hayward Derrick Horton
In the new chapter Bonilla-Silva provides a stinging critique of Obama and the very notion that the election of a black man has a positive impact on the state of racial inequality in America. This is a powerful chapter for a very powerful book.
Judith Blau
Praise for the previous edition:
Every white American should have the privilege to have that eureka moment: Ah! Now I understand what being white means, in the most profound sense.' The entire world looks different from then on. Racism without Racists leads white Americans to that very moment of discovery.
Robin D. G. Kelley
Praise for the previous edition:
Racism without Racists will make many readers uncomfortable, as it should. With care and a wicked sense of humor, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva explores the kind of subtle, everyday racism that some of 'our best friends' unconsciously perpetuate.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780742546851
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
08/03/2006
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.28(h) x 1.04(d)

Meet the Author

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva is professor of sociology at Duke University.

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Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book very intriguing. The authors insights on structural racism gave me an excellent insight into why many people may think racism no longer exists. I enjoyed the many examples and real-world application given to his arguments. My only complaint is the excessive usage of academic language makes it difficult for readers outside of academia. I would suggest a dictionary handy. Overall, if this subject interests then this is good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago