Radical Love: Five Novels by Fanny Howe, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Radical Love: Five Novels

Radical Love: Five Novels

by Fanny Howe
     
 

Fiction. Five short novels gathered into one volume: Nod, The Deep North, Famous Questions, Saving History and Indivisible. "I have not the least doubt that her work is parallel to Paul Auster's, say, or any writer thus whose books are not simply products for the market - albeit the work can reach a very large number of potential readers indeed. In Fanny's case

Overview

Fiction. Five short novels gathered into one volume: Nod, The Deep North, Famous Questions, Saving History and Indivisible. "I have not the least doubt that her work is parallel to Paul Auster's, say, or any writer thus whose books are not simply products for the market - albeit the work can reach a very large number of potential readers indeed. In Fanny's case these will range from contemporary fellow writers questioning ways and means in their art and all who find their enterprise of interest, to those who feel themselves confronted with deeply ingrained questions of religion, person, society, gender, politics, which almost anyone alive at this moment is trying to answer. Her most recently published novel, "Indivisible," is a masterpiece of these determinants, of lives specific, of times and places particular. At the same time it is also a masterwork of the art - no one more actively employs the strategies and possibilities of language than does she"—Robert Creeley.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780976718536
Publisher:
Nightboat Books
Publication date:
12/15/2006
Pages:
627
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.60(d)

What People are saying about this

Robert Creeley
"I have not the least doubt that her work is parallel to Paul Auster's, say, or any writer thus whose books are not simply products for the market - albeit the work can reach a very large number of potential readers indeed. In Fanny's case these will range from contemporary fellow writers questioning ways and means in their art and all who find their enterprise of interest, to those who feel themselves confronted with deeply ingrained questions of religion, person, society, gender, politics, which almost anyone alive at this moment is trying to answer. Her most recently published novel, "Indivisible," is a masterpiece of these determinants, of lives specific, of times and places particular. At the same time it is also a masterwork of the art - no one more actively employs the strategies and possibilities of language than does she.

Meet the Author

Fanny Howe (born 1940 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. She has written many novels in prose collection, and is the mother of novelist Danzy Senna. Her father was a lawyer and her Irish-born mother played in the Abbey Theatre of Dublin for some time. Howe is the recipient of the 2009 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, presented annually by the Poetry Foundation to a living U.S. poet whose lifetime accomplishments warrant extraordinary recognition. She is a sister of Susan Howe, also a poet. Howe has become (arguably) one of the most widely read of American experimental poets. She has also published several volumes of prose, including Lives of the Spirit/Glasstown: Where Something Got Broken (2005) and The Wedding Dress: Meditations on Word and Life (2003), a collection of essays. Several awards have been awarded to her, namely the 2001 Lenore Marshall and Poetry Prize, and the 2005 Griffin Poetry Prize. She is currently a professor emeritus of Writing and Literature at the University of California, San Diego. Poet Michael Palmer commented: "Fanny Howe employs a sometimes fierce, always passionate, spareness in her lifelong parsing of the exchange between matter and spirit. Her work displays as well a political urgency, that is to say, a profound concern for social justice and for the soundness and fate of the polis, the "city on a hill". Writes Emerson, The poet is the sayer, the namer, and represents beauty. Here's the luminous and incontrovertible proof." Bewildered in Boston by Joshua Glenn states that "Fanny Howe isn't part of the local literary canon. But her seven novels about interracial love and utopian dreaming offer a rich social history of Boston in the 1960s and '70s."

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