Radical Passion: Ottilie Assing's Reports from America and Letters to Frederick Douglass

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Overview

Radical Passion examines eighty essays and reports on the United States (1852-1865) by the German-American journalist Ottilie Assing (1819-1884) along with twenty-seven extant letters from Assing to Frederick Douglass during the years 1870-1879. A keen and critical observer of the American scene before and during the Civil War, Assing was passionately commited to her personal freedom and to political and social equality for African Americans. For almost three decades, she and Frederick Douglass were close ...
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Overview

Radical Passion examines eighty essays and reports on the United States (1852-1865) by the German-American journalist Ottilie Assing (1819-1884) along with twenty-seven extant letters from Assing to Frederick Douglass during the years 1870-1879. A keen and critical observer of the American scene before and during the Civil War, Assing was passionately commited to her personal freedom and to political and social equality for African Americans. For almost three decades, she and Frederick Douglass were close intellectual collaborators and lovers. The reports and essays, originally written in German, are presented in their first English translation; an introduction provides biographical background and historical context.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
German-American journalist Ottilie Assing was a supporter of radical abolitionism, women's emancipation, and other radical social movements of the 19th century. She and Frederick Douglass were close intellectual collaborators and lovers, and this book provides a first-hand look into her life, love, and politics, through a collection of 80 reports and essays she wrote about life in the United States between 1852 and 1865, as well as 27 of her letters to Douglass from 1870-1879. Lohmann (English and American studies, Indiana U.) supplies an introduction to Assing and her work, as well as notes to each of her essays. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Series Editor's Foreword
Introduction
Reports and Essays, 1852-1865 1
1 From Hamburg to New York 3
2 Schenectady - Barnum - Curiosities - Life in a Republic - Mrs. Trollope 8
3 The Tombs - The Washington Exhibition - Minstrels 13
4 From New York to Schenectady - The Shakers 19
5 A Small Western Town 25
6 Winter Portrait of a Small Western Town 29
7 From West to East 33
8 An Antislavery Meeting 35
9 An Excursion to Sing Sing 40
10 Rambles Through New York 47
11 Colored People in New York 54
12 American Types: Women - Irish - Blacks - Chinese - Indians - Gypsies 60
13 Preface to the German Translation of My Bondage and My Freedom 68
14 The Presidential Election and Slavery 71
15 The Election - Art and Industry Exposition - Women's Rights 78
16 Kansas and the Extension of Slavery 84
17 Wendell Phillips - A "Gift Enterprise" 88
18 Hoboken 90
19 Meeting of the Antislavery Societies: Frederick Douglass 94
20 The Money Crisis - Antislavery Movements 96
21 A Negro Colony in Canada 99
22 The Mayoral Election - A Fugitive Slave 103
23 The Kansas Controversy - Lola Montez - Public Lectures 106
24 Revivals - Women's Rights - Female Dress Reform - Women and Work 110
25 Feeding the Poor - Penny Boardinghouses - Emigration Ships 116
26 Opera - Musard's Orchestra - A Rogues' Gallery - Barnum 119
27 Kansas - Anniversaries 123
28 An Excommunication - Slavery and the Germans 127
29 Malcontents - Indians - James Monroe - A Marylander Without Slaves 132
30 A Captured Slave Ship - Retreat of Reverend Brownlow 135
31 Revivals and Spiritualism 137
32 State and Congressional Election - Slavery 139
33 New Efforts to Colonize the Negroes 141
34 Democrats Congratulated 143
35 Cuba - Public Lectures - Mount Vernon - Buying a Slave's Freedom 146
36 A Fashionable Preacher 150
37 Anniversaries 152
38 Slave Trade - Hatred of America 154
39 A Visit with Gerrit Smith 158
40 Frederick Douglass 163
41 The Insurrection at Harpers Ferry 165
42 The Aftermath of John Brown's Trial 170
43 John Brown's Execution and Its Consequences 175
44 Literary War of the North Against the South - The Octoroon 181
45 Lecturers - Painting - The Cooper Institute 184
46 Mormonism - Preparations for the Presidential Election 187
47 Presidential Candidates - Anniversaries - Humboldt's Letters 190
48 Election Prospects - Southern Fear - A Convention of Infidels 194
49 The Presidential Election - Republicans and Democrats 198
50 Developments in the Southern Part of the Union 202
51 The Public Crisis 205
52 Outbreak of Hostilities - Martial Spirit 207
53 The War 211
54 War - Douglas's Death - Missouri Germans - A Black Hero - Barnum 215
55 Civil War - Fremont and the Government - A Rogues' Gallery 220
56 War - Slavery - The Charleston Fire - An Important Document 224
57 Slavery and Government - Women and Slavery - Soldiers - Supplies 228
58 Drastic Change - Southern Knighthood - Executing a Slave Trader 232
59 The War - The Slavery Question - Color Prejudice 236
60 General Hunter and the Government - Blacks - The Homestead Bill 239
61 The Emancipation of Slaves 243
62 Consequences of War - Congressional Elections - McClellan 248
63 New Defeats - Corruption - Religious Conditions 252
64 Emancipation Proclamation - Conditions in Mississippi 256
65 Humbug - Psychology - Dwarves - Behavior of Negroes in the South 260
66 American Conditions - Mob Rule 265
67 Colored Troops - Cost Increases - Luxury - Worker Unrest - Bloomerism 269
68 Anniversary of the Anti - Slavery Society 274
69 Effects of War on Social Conditions and on Slavery 276
70 A Negro Regiment - Radical Germans 280
71 The Presidential Election 283
72 The Presidential Election 288
73 Christmas and New Year's - Slavery - Everett - A New German Book 294
74 The Constitutional Abolition of Slavery 298
75 A Public Celebration - Corruption 303
76 Thrills of Victory and Depths of Mourning 306
77 The Trial - A Funeral Procession - Reconstruction 310
78 Lincoln's Assassins - Jefferson Davis - Emancipation 314
79 Presidential Policies - Persecution of Negroes - Embittered Southerners 319
80 Victorious South - Half- and Whole-hearted - Black Literary Institute 323
App Letters to Frederick Douglass, 1870-1879 327
Index 369
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2003

    Love is color blind!

    A book that not only covered the love and friendship between two people but the life of Fredrick Douglass and the struggles he faced , being black, married and trying to maintain an important friendship with a woman who's love for him was evident...you almost hoped they would get together ...a great, romance!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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