Radical Reader: A Documentary History of the American Radical Tradition

Overview

Radicalism is as American as apple pie. One can scarcely imagine what American society would look like without the abolitionists, feminists, socialists, union organizers, civil rights workers, gay and lesbian activists, and environmentalists who have fought stubbornly to breathe life into the promises of freedom and equality that lie at the heart of American democracy.

The first anthology of its kind, The Radical Reader brings together more than 200 primary documents in a ...

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The Radical Reader: A Documentary History of the American Radical Tradition

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Overview

Radicalism is as American as apple pie. One can scarcely imagine what American society would look like without the abolitionists, feminists, socialists, union organizers, civil rights workers, gay and lesbian activists, and environmentalists who have fought stubbornly to breathe life into the promises of freedom and equality that lie at the heart of American democracy.

The first anthology of its kind, The Radical Reader brings together more than 200 primary documents in a comprehensive collection of the writings of America’s native radical tradition. Spanning the time from the colonial period to the twenty-first century, the documents have been drawn from a wealth of sources—speeches, manifestos, newspaper editorials, literature, pamphlets, and private letters. From Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense” to Kate Millett’s “Sexual Politics,” these are the documents that sparked, guided, and distilled the most influential movements in American history. Brief introductory essays by the editors provide a rich biographical and historical context for each selection included.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
It's bracing to be reminded that the American experiment was radical at its inception-that in their own day the founding fathers (and mothers) were not hallowed figures but revolutionaries charting a new political path. Thus, among the 155 entries selected by two Harvard academics, are the 1765 Resolutions of the Stamp Act Congress and the Bill of Rights. Also here are crucial documents from the abolitionist movement (such as Frederick Douglass's "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?"); feminist texts, from Sarah Grimke's Letters on the Equality of the Sexes to the 19th Amendment giving women the vote; texts of the 60s counterculture, from Allen Ginsberg's "Howl" to a Weathermen brochure; and the volume ends in the immediate past with a 2002 open letter by academics opposing the invasion of Iraq. Each entry is preceded by a brief introduction providing historical and biographical context. "By definition, radicals are a minority," writes historian Eric Foner in his foreword. Members of the newest left, whether antiwar or anti-globalization, will find a sense of roots and tradition in this comprehensive anthology. (July) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
For this collection, McCarthy and McMillian (both history & literature, Harvard) selected more than 200 primary documents representing American progressive radical traditions. Arranged under "Abolitionism," "Suffrage and Feminism," "Land and Labor," "New Negro to Black Power," "New Left and Counterculture," "Modern Feminism," "Radical Environmentalism," and "Queer Liberation," among other categories, the letters, speeches, editorials, and documents (e.g., the Bill of Rights) showcase the ideas of Phillis Wheatley, Mark Twain, Black Elk, Rachel Carson, Aaron McGruder, and others who worked within radical traditions to advance the ideals of "freedom, equality, justice, and opportunity." Each document is accompanied by the title of its source, selected readings, and a brief introductory paragraph with biographical and historical information. An index would have helped, but by bringing many hard-to-find documents under one cover, this anthology will excite readers in discussing why radicals from all walks of life have made progressive ideals meaningful to Americans. Recommended for college, high school, and public libraries.-Charles L. Lumpkins, Pennsylvania State Univ., State College Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781565848276
  • Publisher: New Press, The
  • Publication date: 8/1/2003
  • Pages: 688
  • Product dimensions: 6.42 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 1.62 (d)

Meet the Author


Timothy Patrick McCarthy is a lecturer on history and literature and on public policy at Harvard University, where he directs the Sexuality, Gender, and Human Rights Program at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. An award-winning scholar, teacher, and activist, he is a co-editor, with John McMillian, of The Radical Reader: A Documentary History of the American Radical Tradition and of Protest Nation: Words That Inspired a Century of American Radicalism; a co-editor, with John Stauffer, of Prophets of Protest: Reconsidering the History of American Abolitionism; and the editor of The Indispensable Zinn: The Essential Writings of the ”People’s Historian”, all published by The New Press. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

John McMillian is an assistant professor of history at Georgia State University. His articles and review essays have appeared in Radical History Review, Rethinking History, American Quarterly, and elsewhere. He is a co-editor, with Timothy Patrick McCarthy, of The Radical Reader: A Documentary History of the American Radical and Protest Nation: Words That Inspired a Century of American Radicalism (both published by The New Press) and the author of Smoking Typewriters: The Sixties Underground Press and the Rise of Alternative Media in America and Beatles vs. Stones.

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Table of Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Ch. 1 American Revolution 9
1 The Rights of the British Colonies Asserted and Proved (1764) 11
2 Resolutions of the Stamp Act Congress (1765) 14
3 Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania to the Inhabitants of the British Colonies (1768) 17
4 A State of the Rights of the Colonists (1772) 22
5 Slave Petitions for Freedom (1773) 25
6 Speech at the Second Virginia Convention (1775) 29
7 Common Sense (1776) 33
8 On Being Brought from Africa to America (1773) and To His Excellency General Washington (1776) 38
9 Letter to John Adams (1776) 41
10 Declaration of Independence (1776) 44
11 An Act for Establishing Religious Freedom (1785) 48
12 Petition from Shays' Rebellion (1786) 51
13 The Bill of Rights (1791) 54
14 A Charge (1797) 57
Ch. 2 Utopian Visions 59
15 Six Sermons on Intemperance (1826) 61
16 The Rights of Man to Property (1829) 63
17 Lectures on the Revivals of Religion (1835) 66
18 Manifesto (1840) 69
19 Self-Reliance (1841) 73
20 Slave Spirituals (c. 1600s-1800s) 76
21 Resistance to Civil Government (1849) 79
22 Leaves of Grass (1855) 84
23 Second Inaugural Address (1864) 89
24 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) 92
25 Looking Backward, 2000-1887 (1888) 98
26 Herland (1915) 103
Ch. 3 Abolitionism 109
27 Opening Editorial: Freedom's Journal (1827) 111
28 An Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World (1829) 114
29 Opening Editorial: The Liberator (1831) 118
30 Confession (1831) 120
31 Declaration of Sentiments (1833) 124
32 Productions (1835) 128
33 An Appeal to the Christian Women of the South (1836) 131
34 American Slavery As It Is (1839) 135
35 An Address to the Slaves of the United States (1843) 138
36 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845) 141
37 Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) 145
38 What to the Slave is the Fourth of July? (1852) 151
39 The Condition, Elevation, Emigration, and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States Politically Considered (1852) 154
40 Last Speech to the Jury (1859) 157
41 Thirteenth (1865), Fourteenth (1868), and Fifteenth (1870) Amendments 160
Ch. 4 Suffrage and Feminism 163
42 Letters on the Equality of the Sexes (1838) 165
43 Woman in the Nineteenth Century (1845) 169
44 Seneca Falls Convention: Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions (1848) 172
45 The Rights of Women (1848) 176
46 Sojourner Truth: Ar'n't I A Woman? (1851) 178
47 Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861) 181
48 Letter to Abby Kelley Foster (1867) 185
49 Appeal to the National Democratic Convention (1868) 188
50 Declaration of the Rights of Women (1876) 191
51 Womanhood A Vital Element (1886) 196
52 Solitude of Self (1892) 199
53 A Double Standard (1895) 203
54 A Red Record (1895) 206
55 National Call for a League of Women Voters (1919) 211
56 Nineteenth Amendment (1920) 213
Ch. 5 Land and Labor 215
57 Declaration of Independence (1829) 217
58 Address to Young Mechanics (1830) 220
59 An Indian's Looking-Glass for the White Man (1836) 223
60 Vote Yourself A Farm (1846) 227
61 A Reduction of Hours, An Increase in Wages (1865) 230
62 Declaration of Principles (1867) 233
63 Statement of Principles (1869) 236
64 The Great Uprising (1877) 239
65 Preamble (1878) 243
66 The Crime of Poverty (1885) 246
67 Omaha Platform (1892) 250
68 Appeal (1892) 253
69 Statement to the American Railway Union (1894) 256
70 Declaration of Interdependence (1895) 259
71 Cross of Gold Speech (1896) 264
72 Black Elk Speaks (1932) 269
Ch. 6 Anarchism, Socialism, and Communism 275
73 The Jungle (1905) 277
74 Manifesto and Preamble (1905 and 1908) 281
75 The General Strike (1911) 285
76 Anarchism: What It Really Stands For (1911) 288
77 Speech to Striking Coal Miners (1912) 296
78 The Trouble at Lawrence (1912) 300
79 War in Paterson (1913) 304
80 Address to the Jury (1918) 310
81 Why I Am a Socialist (1928) 314
82 Acceptance Speech at the National Nominating Convention of the Workers (Communist) Party of America (1928) 320
83 Share Our Wealth (1935) 324
Ch. 7 "New Negro" to Black Power 327
84 Two Negro Radicalisms (1919) 329
85 The New Negro - What Is He? (1920) 333
86 Africa for the Africans (1923) 336
87 The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain (1926) 340
88 You Cannot Kill the Working Class (1937) 344
89 Why Should We March? (1942) 349
90 The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Made It (1955) 352
91 We Must Fight Back (1959) 356
92 Wake Up America! (1963) 359
93 Letter from Birmingham Jail (1963) 362
94 My Dungeon Shook (1963) 378
95 The Ballot or the Bullet (1964) 382
96 What We Want (1966) 390
97 What We Want, What We Believe (1966) 397
98 Political Prisoners, Prisons, and Black Liberation (1971) 400
99 The Gary Declaration (1972) 407
Ch. 8 Modern Feminism 411
100 The Feminine Mystique (1963) 413
101 Sex and Caste: A Kind of Memo (1965) 417
102 Statement of Purpose (1966) 421
103 No More Miss America! (1968) 425
104 The Myth of the Vaginal Orgasm (1968) 428
105 Sexual Politics: A Manifesto for Revolution (1970) 433
106 The Enemy Within (1970) 436
107 Double Jeopardy: To Be Black and Female (1971) 440
108 Boston Women's Health Book Collective: Our Bodies, Ourselves (1973) 445
109 The Combahee River Collective Statement (1977) 449
110 Pornography: Men Possessing Women (1981) 453
111 ManifestA: Young Women, Feminism and the Future (2000) 458
Ch. 9 The New Left and Counterculture 461
112 Howl (1956) 463
113 The Port Huron Statement (1962) 468
114 One Dimensional Man (1964) 477
115 Berkeley Fall: The Berkeley Student Rebellion of 1964 (1965) 483
116 In White America (1967) 489
117 The Student as Nigger (1967) 495
118 Predictions for Yippie Activities (1968) 501
119 Columbia Liberated (1968) 503
120 Bring the War Home (1969) 507
121 The Weather Underground: Communique #1 (1970) 511
Ch. 10 Radical Environmentalism 515
122 Walden (1854) 517
123 My People Are Ebbing Away Like a Fast-Receding Tide (1855) 519
124 Man and Nature (1864) 524
125 The Destruction of the Redwoods (1901) 527
126 A Sand County Almanac (1949) 530
127 Silent Spring (1962) 533
128 Desert Solitaire (1968) 537
129 Letter from Delano (1969) 542
130 The Closing Circle (1971) 546
131 Animal Liberation (1975) 551
132 Strategic Monkeywrenching (1985) 555
133 Environmental Racism and the Environmental Justice Movement (1993) 558
Ch. 11 Queer Liberation 561
134 The Importance of Being Different (1954) 563
135 Gay Power Comes to Sheridan Square (1969) 568
136 Notes of a Radical Lesbian (1969) 573
137 Refugees from Amerika: A Gay Manifesto (1970) 577
138 The Woman-Identified Woman (1970) 584
139 What We Want, What We Believe (1971) 589
140 How to Zap Straights (1973) 593
141 Post-Action Position Statement on its "Stop the Church" Action (1989) 596
142 A Queer Manifesto (1993) 598
143 Matthew's Passion (1998) 603
Epilogue: New Directions 607
144 Why Johnny Can't Dissent (1995) 609
145 Habeus Corpus is a Legal Entitlement (1996) 617
146 Transgender Movement: International Bill of Gender Rights (1995) and Read My Lips (1997) 623
147 Culture Jamming (1999) 631
148 WTO: The Battle in Seattle (An Eyewitness Account) (1999) 636
149 Freedom Agenda (1999) 643
150 The Academic Labor Movement: Understanding Its Origins and Current Challenges (2000) 650
151 5 Days That Shook the World (2000) 655
152 A Crisis of Democracy (2000) 660
153 None Dare Call It Treason (2000) 666
154 Harvard Living Wage Campaign: Why We Are Sitting In (2001) 676
155 Antiwar Documents: The Boondocks (2002) and We Oppose Both Saddam Hussein and the U.S. War on Iraq: A call for a new democratic U.S. foreign policy (2003) 681
Permissions 685
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