Radio Iris

Radio Iris

3.0 2
by Anne-Marie Kinney
     
 

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"Radio Iris has a lovely, eerie, anxious quality to it. Iris's observations are funny, and the story has a dramatic otherworldly payoff that is unexpected and triumphant."
—Deb Olin Unferth, The New York Times Book Review

"A noirish nod to the monotony of work."
O: The Oprah Magazine

"Kinney is a Southern California

Overview

"Radio Iris has a lovely, eerie, anxious quality to it. Iris's observations are funny, and the story has a dramatic otherworldly payoff that is unexpected and triumphant."
—Deb Olin Unferth, The New York Times Book Review

"A noirish nod to the monotony of work."
O: The Oprah Magazine

"Kinney is a Southern California Camus."
Los Angeles Magazine

"'The Office' as scripted by Kafka."
Minneapolis Star-Tribune

"[An] astute evocation of office weirdness and malaise."
The Wall Street Journal

Radio Iris follows Iris Finch, a twentysomething socially awkward daydreamer and receptionist at Larmax, Inc., a company whose true function she doesn’t understand (though she’s heard her boss refer to himself as “a businessman”).

Gradually, her boss’ erratic behavior becomes even more erratic, her coworkers begin disappearing, the phone stops ringing, making her role at Larmax moot, and a mysterious man appears to be living in the office suite next door.

Radio Iris is an ambient, eerie dream of a novel, written with remarkable precision and grace that could also serve as an appropriate allegory for our modern recession.

Anne-Marie Kinney’s short fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Indiana Review, Black Clock, Keyhole, and Satellite Fiction.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Gen-Y has an angst-ridden poster girl in Iris Finch, a 24-year-old receptionist at a nondescript American office, exhausted after days of doing nothing and dreaming of strange images: a house in the desert, a cluster of windmills. While blasting the radio to drown out her loneliness, Iris listlessly searches for the joy she once found in everyday things. But even when her boss starts behaving suspiciously, her co-workers begin to vanish, and a mysterious tenant appears in the office space next door, Iris still feels bored, and sometimes, so does the reader. Amid the mystery growing around her, Iris is keenly perceptive but nearly unnoticeable, like a radio receiver—listening, observing, responding to the increasingly odd events with cryptic messages written on napkins and stashed in drawers. Her love of music makes for a pleasant soundtrack that speaks to Iris's longing for connection, and her fear of disappearing into an unremarkable life builds and then dissipates like dust in the desert wind. Meanwhile, her brother Neil struggles with the memory of a childhood tragedy he can't shake, and which taints his connection to Iris. Kinney's debut novel reads like an indie movie, meandering through short chapters with a staccato rhythm and interspersed with jolts of reality that wake the reader out of the novel's dream with a sad smile. (May)
The New York Times Book Review
Radio Iris has a lovely, eerie, anxious quality to it. Iris's observations are funny, and the story has a dramatic otherworldly payoff that is unexpected and triumphant.
—Deb Olin Unferth

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780983247173
Publisher:
Two Dollar Radio
Publication date:
05/15/2012
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Anne-Marie Kinney: Anne-Marie Kinney has been published in Black Clock, Indiana Review, and Keyhole, and performed at L.A.’s Word Theatre. Radio Iris is her first novel.

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Radio Iris 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book based on a newspaper article recommendation. I found the book to be a set of disconnected ramblings, that don't quite ever tie together. I didn't find it "riveting" as I've seen others describe it. It was a chore to plod through it to the end, waiting for something to happen ---------------------
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A receptionist's world becomes strangely vague. Should she try to reach out to the enigmatic inhabitant of the adjoining office?