Rage

Rage

4.2 5
by Gene Kerrigan
     
 

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Vincent Naylor, just released from jail, resumes doing what he does best, planning for an armored car robbery. Bob Tidey, an honest policeman, discouraged by his colleagues making deals with criminals and about to commit perjury, is investigating the murder of a crooked banker. A call from an old acquaintance will change his course of investigation. Maura Coady, a

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Overview

Vincent Naylor, just released from jail, resumes doing what he does best, planning for an armored car robbery. Bob Tidey, an honest policeman, discouraged by his colleagues making deals with criminals and about to commit perjury, is investigating the murder of a crooked banker. A call from an old acquaintance will change his course of investigation. Maura Coady, a retired nun living on regrets and bad memories, sees something that she can't ignore and decides to tell someone. She makes a phone call that sets in motion a violent fate.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Marilyn Stasio
Kerrigan's clean, spare style adapts smoothly to the striving characters who lend their many voices to this narrative. The crooks may be more direct in their language and clear about their goals than the morally ambivalent Tidey. What's more striking, though, is the similarity of their aspirations and the familiarity of their discontents…Beneath the skin all these characters are underdogs, snarling with rage at being kicked too long by the crooked politicians, bankers and other looters who ran their country into the ground.
Publishers Weekly
Taut prose distinguishes Kerrigan’s accomplished crime novel set in contemporary Dublin. Det. Sgt. Bob Tidey faces a moral quandary after investigating a banker’s murder. Former nun Maura Coady, who keeps watch over a quiet suburb, makes a fateful phone call, while within the city’s criminal underbelly, swaggering Vincent Naylor and his brother, Noel, are preparing for their next big heist. Kerrigan (Little Criminals) touches on broader social and political issues, from the Irish housing bubble to the long shadows cast by abuse within the Catholic church, which deepen rather than distract from the main action as it speeds ahead with wheels shrieking, preparing the reader for an ending whose inevitability doesn’t diminish its explosive impact. While these Dublin streetscapes lack the hard glamour of L.A. noir, Tidey emerges as a prototypical Raymond Chandler hero, holding fast to his moral compass in a corrupt world that demands compromise even from good men. Agent: Melanie Jackson, the Melanie Jackson Agency. (Feb.)
From the Publisher
"Kerrigan's gripping police procedural...is good news for readers who can appreciate the moral complexities of this flawed hero."
-The New York Times

"With a dexterous use of language married to masterful plotting, Kerrigan has something of James Joyce's ability in conjuring up a vivid Dublin—but this modern city is very different than the one Leopold Bloom wandered through."
-The Independent

"Kerrigan's prose is luxury stuff."
-The New Yorker

Library Journal
Kerrigan is an award-winning Irish journalist (Round Up The Usual Suspects) whose crime fiction (A Midnight Choir; Little Criminals) has an authenticity born of a socialist worldview, great writing, and a feel for the criminal and paramilitary gangs operating in urban Dublin. He deals here with "tiger kidnappings," the post-Celtic Tiger miasma of ruin, the recently published reports on clerical abuse, police collaboration with politicians, etc. The protagonist is Detective Tidey, a complex, flawed, but humane individual. Tidey is dealing with a surfeit of domestic and work pressures while pursuing his investigations, using unorthodox measures if required, including perjury. The novel centers around his attempt to solve the murder of a high-flying banker, which eventually links to an Ordinary Decent Criminal (ODC) operation that goes awry. The rage that follows is visceral and lethal. It is also a metaphor for the suppressed rage of many Irish from years of abuse, exploitation, greed, and negligence of bankers, speculators, and politicians. VERDICT For authenticity, narrative, plot, writing skill, the gritty noirish crime milieu setting, and the post-Celtic-Tiger-Ireland toxicity, Kerrigan's latest well deserves its CWA Gold Dagger Award for Best Crime Novel of the Year.—Seamus Scanlon, Ctr. for Worker Education, CUNY
Kirkus Reviews
In contemporary Dublin, a hastily devised robbery and its aftermath unfold from the perspectives of diverse perps, cops and witnesses. Such is the moral ambiguity surrounding Detective Sgt. Bob Tidey's job that the very first time he is to take the stand in an important case as a witness rather than an investigator, he struggles with whether to commit perjury by contradicting his original statement, something that will cause him headaches at work but smooth the ruffled feathers of a local politico. Meanwhile, unrepentant thief Vincent Naylor, back on the street after a stint in prison, has no such reservations about returning to his life of crime. He and his brother Noel, teaming up with minor crime boss Albert Bannerman, hatch a plan to rob a van used by the Ulster Bank. As Vincent gets a closer look at Bannerman's ragtag gang, he has second thoughts, exacerbated by his cresting love for hairdresser Michelle Flood, but eventually decides that it's too late to turn back. Tidey gets a heads-up about the plan from Maura Coady, a retired and very observant nun with whom he has a deep and complex relationship. (An elliptical prologue foreshadows the relationship and the death of a man named Emmett Sweetman, which will cast a long shadow over later events.) Missteps in the crime generate their own subplots, which Kerrigan (Little Criminals, 2005, etc.) juggles deftly. An ambitious and nuanced panorama of law and order in Ireland's mean streets, balancing literary elements and full-bodied character portraits with a believable depiction of cops and criminals at work.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781846552564
Publisher:
Harvill Press, The
Publication date:
06/28/2011

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

"Kerrigan's gripping police procedural...is good news for readers who can appreciate the moral complexities of this flawed hero."
-The New York Times

"With a dexterous use of language married to masterful plotting, Kerrigan has something of James Joyce's ability in conjuring up a vivid Dublin—but this modern city is very different than the one Leopold Bloom wandered through."
-The Independent

"Kerrigan's prose is luxury stuff."
-The New Yorker

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