Ragged Dick: Or Streetlife in New York with the Bootblacks

( 3 )

Overview

"Wake up there, youngster," said a rough voice.
Ragged Dick opened his eyes slowly, and stared stupidly in the face of the speaker, but did not offer to get up.
"Wake up, you young vagabond!" said the man a little impatiently; "I suppose you'd lay there all day, if I hadn't called you."
"What time is it?" asked Dick.
"Seven o'clock."
"Seven ...
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Ragged Dick: Or, Street Life in New York with the Boot Blacks

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Overview

"Wake up there, youngster," said a rough voice.
Ragged Dick opened his eyes slowly, and stared stupidly in the face of the speaker, but did not offer to get up.
"Wake up, you young vagabond!" said the man a little impatiently; "I suppose you'd lay there all day, if I hadn't called you."
"What time is it?" asked Dick.
"Seven o'clock."
"Seven o'clock! I oughter've been up an hour ago. I know what 'twas made me so precious sleepy. I went to the Old Bowery last night, and didn't turn in till past twelve."
"You went to the Old Bowery? Where'd you get your money?" asked the man, who was a porter in the employ of a firm doing business on Spruce Street. "Made it by shines, in course. My guardian don't allow me no money for theatres, so I have to earn it."
"Some boys get it easier than that," said the porter significantly.
"You don't catch me stealin', if that's what you mean," said Dick.
"Don't you ever steal, then?"
"No, and I wouldn't. Lots of boys does it, but I wouldn't."
"Well, I'm glad to hear you say that. I believe there's some good in you, Dick, after all."
"Oh, I'm a rough customer!" said Dick. "But I wouldn't steal.
It's mean."
"I'm glad you think so, Dick," and the rough voice sounded gentler than at first. "Have you got any money to buy your breakfast?"
"No, but I'll soon get some."
While this conversation had been going on, Dick had got up. His bedchamber had been a wooden box half full of straw, on which the young boot-black had reposed his weary limbs, and slept as soundly as if it had been a bed of down. He dumped down into the straw without taking the trouble of undressing.
Getting up too was an equally short process. He jumped out of the box, shook himself, picked out one or two straws that had found their way into rents in his clothes, and, drawing a well-worn cap over his uncombed locks, he was all ready for the business of the day.
Dick's appearance as he stood beside the box was rather peculiar. His pants were torn in several places, and had apparently belonged in the first instance to a boy two sizes larger than himself. He wore a vest, all the buttons of which were gone except two, out of which peeped a shirt which looked as if it had been worn a month. To complete his costume he wore a coat too long for him, dating back, if one might judge from its general appearance, to a remote antiquity.
Washing the face and hands is usually considered proper in commencing the day, but Dick was above such refinement. He had no particular dislike to dirt, and did not think it necessary to remove several dark streaks on his face and hands. But in spite of his dirt and rags there was something about Dick that was attractive. It was easy to see that if he had been clean and well dressed he would have been decidedly good-looking. Some of his companions were sly, and their faces inspired distrust; but Dick had a frank, straight-forward manner that made him a favorite.
Dick's business hours had commenced. He had no office to open. His little blacking-box was ready for use, and he looked sharply in the faces of all who passed, addressing each with, "Shine yer boots, sir?"
"How much?" asked a gentleman on his way to his office.
"Ten cents," said Dick, dropping his box, and sinking upon his knees on the sidewalk, flourishing his brush with the air of one skilled in his profession.
"Ten cents! Isn't that a little steep?"
"Well, you know 'taint all clear profit," said Dick, who had already set to work. "There's the blacking costs something, and I have to get a new brush pretty often."
"And you have a large rent too," said the gentleman quizzically, with a glance at a large hole in Dick's coat.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781495926839
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 2/12/2014
  • Pages: 158
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2011

    All Messed Up

    Don't know what happended but it shows random symbols where words are supposed to be and skips lines in the original text. It was free, that was the only good thing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2001

    Ragged Dick, or Street Life in New York By:Horatio Alger

    In the novel ¿Ragged Dick, or Street Life in New York,¿ Horatio Alger invites his readers into the life of a destitute 14 year old bootblack. The novel is an uplifting tale of how a young boy rises from his lower class situation to one of hope and prosperity. Throughout the novel, Dick crosses the venues of many people who impact his life in different ways. By accompanying Dick on his exploits, the reader unveils the many depths of Dick¿s character: his uncultured and often times sarcastic and witty stance, his honest work ethic, and `never give up¿ attitude, as well as his genuine, benevolent, good-hearted outlook. Dick¿s unique and touching characteristics are all uncovered to the reader as Dick goes about life doing his best to ameliorate the lives of others. Horatio Alger not only created a good book, but also a novel of life lessons. In the presentation of Dick¿s character, Alger extends more than meets the eye. Dick Hunter, in his unfitted, wearied jacket, tattered pants, and squalid hat is not initially an indefectible role model. However, from reading ¿Ragged Dick¿ I have realized it is not in judging a person¿s appearance that you come close to discerning what kind of person they really are. Moreover, Alger reveals through Dick¿s character that putting others before yourself is truly rewarding in the long run. Dick Hunter instructs the reader that if he works hard, keeps his chin up and has faith, he will ultimately reap the rewards, thus illustrating Alger¿s famous `rags to riches¿ theory. ¿Ragged Dick¿ is a book for all ages. Alger created it as a children¿s book, but is assuredly more than this. Although the plot is simple enough for younger readers to follow, the underlying moral is one that can be interpreted and valued by readers of all races, sexes, and ages. Indeed, I consider Alger to be one of the most favorable and successful writers of American literary history.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2012

    Finished

    This book was okay

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2005

    Wonderful novel

    An intriguing story about a boy who is trying to be 'spectable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2005

    WOW

    This book is way to complicated and confusing it is hard to get past the 5th page. It is hard to relate to and hard to understand.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted September 11, 2011

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    Posted January 19, 2010

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    Posted May 31, 2010

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    Posted May 25, 2010

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    Posted May 22, 2011

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