The Railway Children [NOOK Book]

Overview

When their Father is taken away unexpectedly, three children and their mother have to leave their comfortable life in London to go and live in a small cottage in the country. This classic tale by Edith Nesbit has had film and TV adaptations, and is loved by children and adults alike. This beautifully made eBook has been specially formatted for today's e-readers by Andrews UK.

When their father is sent away to prison, three London children move to the country where ...

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The Railway Children

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Overview

When their Father is taken away unexpectedly, three children and their mother have to leave their comfortable life in London to go and live in a small cottage in the country. This classic tale by Edith Nesbit has had film and TV adaptations, and is loved by children and adults alike. This beautifully made eBook has been specially formatted for today's e-readers by Andrews UK.

When their father is sent away to prison, three London children move to the country where they keep busy preventing accidents on the nearby railway, making many new friends, and generally learning a good deal about themselves.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This reintroduction of an English classic follows the adventures of three siblings at the turn of the 20th century. Roberta, Peter and Phyllis live in an upperclass English household with adoring parents and little to worry about, until one day when some men unexpectedly escort their father away. The children are never told exactly why this has happened, but their mother assures them that their father will return. Without the breadwinner, the family must move to a small cottage in the countryside where life is quite different than what they were accustomed. The story is primarily about the children's adventures during this time in the country. They live near a railway station and encounter an array of characters and occurrences that provide ongoing excitement as they anxiously await their father's return. The original illustrations and descriptions of family life and social customs in another era may need some explanation which makes this book perfect for class oral reading. The author was a favorite among young people of the day as the story captures an innocent time quite different from today. 2005 (orig. 1906), SeaStar Books, Ages 8 to 11.
—Meredith Kiger, Ph.D.
From the Publisher
 • "Her child characters were remarkable in her day because they are so entirely human. They are intelligent, vain, aggressive, humorous, witty, cruel, compassionate... in fact, they are like adults." —Gore Vidal
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781849894630
  • Publisher: Andrews UK
  • Publication date: 7/3/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,183,843
  • File size: 757 KB

Meet the Author

EDITH NESBIT was born in 1858. Her father died when she was only three and so her family moved all over England. Poverty was something she had known first hand, both as a child and as a young married woman with small children. Like the Railway Childrens' Mother, she was forced to try and sell her stories and poems to editors. Her first children's book, The Treasure Seekers, was published in 1899. She also wrote Five Children & It but her most famous story is The Railway Children which was first published in 1905 and it hasn't been out of print since. Edith Nesbit was a lady ahead of her time — she cut her hair short, which was considered a very bold move in Victorian times, and she was a founding member of a group that worked towards improvements in politics and society called The Fabian Society. She died in 1924.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 20 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    A loveable story for the whole family!

    I really enjoyed this book. I liked reading it to my kids. We all got a good laugh and I think that all of us cried. I recomend this book to families who like a funny and emotional story!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2012

    There is something perfectly lovely about all E. Nesbit's books,

    There is something perfectly lovely about all E. Nesbit's books, and they certainly formed the backdrop to many a day when I was a little girl.

    Reading this particular book as an adult fills me with not only with pleasure but with a deeper understanding. I could not help but wonder if this story, of a father wrongly accused and imprisoned, was not inspired by the Dreyfus affair, which was certainly preoccupying many people's minds at the time.

    One of the delights of Nesbit's writing is that she never condescends to her young readers. Complicated questions of justice, of charity, of the freedoms denied others -- there is quite a wonderful sequence involving a Russian political fugitive -- of absent parents and what it means to perform a heroic act. The children learn things indirectly, peeking into the world of adults from around the corners of childhood. It's very well done.

    One of the things that I noticed most this time around, though, was the amount of freedom children had. Can you imagine children left to play unsupervised in the woods, around a train station, by the train tunnels and tracks themselves? I will be showing my age here, but I recall many days spent wandering by myself in the fields and forests near my childhood home, expected to return only when I got hungry or the streetlights came on. Did I get into some mischief? Yes. Was it a bit dangerous? Yes. And was being left to create a world by myself, and sometimes with other children, good for my imagination, for my sense of independence, for developing a way of being in the world? Undeniably. I wonder, in fact, if I would have become a writer if I hadn't had those days, if I was driven from one place to another, one class to another, one computer to another.

    Well, that's an essay for another place. Here, I'll simply say it was lovely to visit a world, so beautifully crafted, which probably now exists no where except between the pages of a book.

    Recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 8, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Really good

    This is a really good book with three likable kids and a strong mother. The drawings were also good that helped imagine the story. Liked the writing style too.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2013

    Emma watson played hermione in harryy potter

    This is one of her favorite books

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2013

    This is free on the kindle.

    It really is.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2013

    A girl, screams

    He is chained up.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2013

    Escape to the simpler past, and share it with your kids!

    This tale is gripping and uplifting, despite archaic language and too many convenient coincidences. Teens, pre-teens, and bright 4th graders will absorb the message of kindness and generosity without feeling hammered, because the characters command your respect and stir your emotions. GREAT read-aloud story for parents, who could benefit from reminders to stop driving so hard and just appreciate individuality.

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  • Posted March 25, 2009

    A Review of "The Railway Children" by E. Nesbit

    In the late 1800's and 1900's on a cold, dark night, father leaves the house and follows two unusual gentlemen together. However, he doesn't return, and since Father isn't able to work for money during that time because he left, the family becomes poorer and soon in poverty that they have to move into a small cottage near a railway station. E. Nesbit wrote this historical fiction book from the view point and perspective of Peter, Phyllis, and Roberta, the three children of the family and the main characters.
    The three children didin't quite adjusted to the new setting in the beginning. But as time past, they got quite along with the new home and location. They meet new and different people in the area such as the station master, the Porter, and an old gentlemen who soon becomes their trustworthy friend. They also discover new places and go through many fun, dangerous, and sometimes tragic adventures. As they live more and more in the small house, they discover more facts and secrets about what has happened to Father and if he will ever return. In fact, the separation of Father and the family's poverty is the main conflict, actually.
    Even though the children change during their life, their personalities stay quite constant as the one they had in their old house. Peter keeps being brave and courageous, as well as conscious. Phyllis still keeps her talkative voice and picky personality. And last, Roberta's personality remains brave like Peter and keeps her well-behaved behavior. Peter is the only boy and Phyllis, Roberta are both little girls.
    I really liked this book not only because it was fun and full of adventure, but also because it contains truths about life and helps me learn new challenging words. To me, I would recommend this book to anyone who has ever thought or imagined about a family's struggle, or about life during the eighteen and nineteen hundreds. It may help you learn about life, as well as entertaining you. And if you want to know what happens to Father and the ending, you'll have to read the book!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2008

    A reviewer

    I notice that everyone else who gave reviews on this book said they loved it, so I have a feeling several people will be annoyed at me! But I really didn't enjoy the railway children. I felt like the author used really complex language excessively, and I found it difficult to relate to any of the characters, especially while trying to translate what E. Nesbit was saying. The plot seemed a little too classic and not very original- a from riches to rags sort of thing. I didn't enjoy it at all, really. But maybe I'm just crazy. That's just my reaction when I read it.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2008

    Railway Children

    I found this book to be very emotional at certain times.You are really able to relate to the children being separated from their father. It made me cry but be happy at the same time. I would highly recommend this book to anybody,but especially to people who may have had a parent die at a young age.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2008

    Railway Children

    This was a very good book. It made me cry and yet be happy at the same time. You are really able to relate to the children being separated from their father. I would highly recommend this book to anybody but especially to a person who may have had a parent die at a young age.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2007

    a lovely, enjoyable read

    These children are not presented as 'picture perfect'--they do argue and fight on occasion, but they have been brought up well so that they learn from their mistakes and genuinely want to do right. Their actions illustrate love for family, concern for the less fortunate, and the value of being friendly. The children do know to pray, and Mother makes the following comment. 'Don't you think it's rather nice to think that we'rein a book that God's writing? If I were writing the book, I might make mistakes. But God knows how to make the story end just right--in the way that's best for us.' I consider this book a lovely story, and I truly enjoyed reading it very much.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2001

    Great Read-Aloud Children's Book

    We enjoyed reading this aloud each night. My children loved the story. This prompted us to read other Nesbit books, but this has been our favorite!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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