Rain, Rain, Rain Forest by Brenda Z. Guiberson, Steve Jenkins |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Rain, Rain, Rain Forest

Rain, Rain, Rain Forest

by Brenda Z. Guiberson, Steve Jenkins
     
 

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Splitter, splat, splash! While they sleep, the forest fills with the sounds of the night creatures. Sloop! A silky anteater slurps up thousands of ants. Flap flap! A bat bites a fig. Hssss. A snake thrusts its tongue to taste the air. The air carries the taste of mouse. Everywhere night creatures with huge bright eyes slither and slurp through the

Overview

Splitter, splat, splash! While they sleep, the forest fills with the sounds of the night creatures. Sloop! A silky anteater slurps up thousands of ants. Flap flap! A bat bites a fig. Hssss. A snake thrusts its tongue to taste the air. The air carries the taste of mouse. Everywhere night creatures with huge bright eyes slither and slurp through the darkness.

Come explore the rain forest!

A downpour wakes the creatures of the rain forest. Howler monkeys roar and drink the water that drips from nearby leaves. Birds with rainbow beaks fly in search of shelter. A poison dart frog finds a tiny pool where her tadpoles can grow. In a place that gets twenty feet of rain a year, it is a way of life.

Vibrant, colorful collages and an inviting text take young readers on an exhilarating tour of the tropical rain forest.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Vivid, engrossing slice of life.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The attractive volume transports readers into the steamy, humid depths of a habitat where ticks and moths live in the fur of a sloth and azteca ants and aphids work in tandem, devouring tree trunks for nourishment.” —Publishers Weekly

“* Vibrant words and sensory impressions bring the creatures' noisy cacophony and slithering, swooping motions up close, while gracefully incorporated facts convey a surprising amount of information about basic survival. ” —Booklist, starred review

“The present-tense narrative offers action-packed and animal-crammed descriptions of the residents' doings, livened up by onomatopoeic exclamations that evoke the sounds of the teeming biosystem. The muted greens and gray-blues of the cut-and-torn-paper collages recall the damp, dim warmth of the downpour under the canopy, and the positioning of focal points in foreground and background space deepens each prospect and highlights luxurious textural details.” —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

“Both Guiberson's text and Jenkins' pictures are similarly packed with detail, capturing the relationships among plants, animals, and the environment that support and sustain life.” —The Horn Book

“This eye-catching picture book transports readers to a tropical rain forest. . . .Effective use of onomatopoeia further enhances the narrative with forest sounds. Jenkins uses his signature collage style to bring this realm alive for viewers.” —School Library Journal

“Guiberson's nicely paced test is packed with information. . . . Jenkins' colorful and informative collage illustrations are a perfect complement to the text.” —Scripps-Howard syndication

Publishers Weekly
Jenkins's collages also shine in Rain, Rain, Rain Forest by Brenda Z. Guiberson, illus. by Steve Jenkins, particularly the thin, nearly transparent strips of paper used to intimate rain. The attractive volume transports readers into the steamy, humid depths of a habitat where ticks and moths live in the fur of a sloth and azteca ants and aphids work in tandem, devouring tree trunks for nourishment. A scientist arrives late in the account, seeking undiscovered creatures and curatives. (May) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Using plenty of lush description and onomatopoeic words—such as kwak, crrik, crriks,drip-drips, sloops—Cuiberson conveys a typical day or two in rainforest life. The text covers a fair amount of territory. There is flora such as bromeliads, orchids with roots hanging in the air, moss, and mangoes. There is fauna. A sloth weaves the narrative together as it slowly makes its weekly way to the tree bottom to go to the bathroom, and then slowly makes its way back up the tree again. Capuchin monkeys groom each other in comfort after a harpy eagle carries one off for food. Johnson's signature collage illustrations are, as usual, a marvel of cutting, textures, patterns, and tints. But this medium of necessity cannot work in details that make a young reader totally believe in the information at hand. For instance, a bromeliad is rendered as cut ovals over which a watery oval is pasted down—but the look is definitely not pool-like in the sense of a true bromeliad. While the text mentions orchids with swollen bulbs in which water is stored, the illustrations depict a six-foot-long iguana nibbling an orchid leaf but no bulbs. The text tells readers that a poison-dart frog carries a tadpole baby up the tree on her back in order to deposit it in the bromeliad pool. How? No picture shows us. The sloth's face looks friendly without necessarily looking real. For children who are familiar with some part of the rainforest, this book provides a pleasant and in-depth look at an ecosystem with enough specifics to send others off to the encyclopedia to further investigate. But the illustrations are at odds with the informational text. While this picture storybook gives the reader plenty ofrainforest information, no glossary, index, or labels support the learner so this hybrid may fall between the cracks in the curriculum. 2004, Henry Holt, Ages 7 to 10.
—Susan Hepler, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-This eye-catching picture book transports readers to a tropical rain forest. Smoothly incorporating a great deal of information, the text follows creatures such as a sloth, capuchin monkeys, and a poison-dart frog as they move through their habitat. Guiberson conveys the relationships among different animals by describing their activities at various times of day. Small dramas such as a squabble over nest space reveal the continual change and movement in this environment. Effective use of onomatopoeia further enhances the narrative with forest sounds. Jenkins uses his signature collage style to bring this realm alive for viewers. Although his humans seem a bit stiff, they are minor figures in the overall portrayal of the lush, green world. Even collections with several volumes about rain forests will want this introduction.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Guiberson, one of the best science writers around for younger readers, trails a tree sloth as, between one deluge and the next, it makes its sloooooow way down to the ground for an infrequent toilette, then returns to the rain-forest canopy. Meanwhile, all sorts of other local residents pass in review, from the moths and other insects dwelling in the sloth's fur, to tree frogs, howler monkeys, and, for one scary swoop, a harpy eagle. With typically inventive use of texture and paint, Jenkins's paper collages depict the creatures, ants to a visiting scientist collecting specimens of medicinal plants, in simplified but realistic natural settings. Vicarious visits to rain forests abound, but this vivid, engrossing slice of life makes a worthy companion or replacement for such essential titles as Madeleine Dunphy's Here Is the Tropical Rain Forest (1994) or Kathryn Lasky's Most Beautiful Roof in the World (1997). (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781250056771
Publisher:
Square Fish
Publication date:
03/24/2015
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
534,118
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Brenda Z. Guiberson has written many books for children, including Cactus Hotel, Spoonbill Swamp, Moon Bear, and Disasters. As a child, Brenda never thought she wanted to be a writer—her dreams tended more toward jungle explorer. She graduated from the University of Washington with degrees in English and Fine Art. She started thinking about writing for children when her son went to elementary school, and she volunteered in his class and in the school library. After taking exciting trips that involved a fifty-foot cactus, hungry alligators, and sunset-colored spoonbills, she wanted to create books for children that would be like a field trip. Her books are full of well-researched detail, and Brenda sees this research as an adventure—one that allows her to be a jungle explorer at last. She lives in Seattle, Washington.

Steve Jenkins is the acclaimed illustrator or author/illustrator of numerous books, including The Top of the World: Climbing Mount Everest, which received the Boston Globe/Horn Book Award for Nonfiction. He lives in Boulder, Colorado, with his family.

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