Raining Sardines
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Raining Sardines

5.0 3
by Enrique Flores-Galbis
     
 

Wealthy landowner Don Rigol practically owns the town. To expand his coffee plantation, he will lay waste the mountain jungle and the secret valley where the ancient breed of Paso Fino horses roams wild. Can best friends Enriquito and Ernestina find a way to save the ponies, ensure justice at a trumped-up trial, and reclaim the mountain for their people? Will they

Overview

Wealthy landowner Don Rigol practically owns the town. To expand his coffee plantation, he will lay waste the mountain jungle and the secret valley where the ancient breed of Paso Fino horses roams wild. Can best friends Enriquito and Ernestina find a way to save the ponies, ensure justice at a trumped-up trial, and reclaim the mountain for their people? Will they rescue lost Indian treasure guarded by a mighty cayman with a golden chain around his neck?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Janet L. Rose
Ernestina and Enriquito discover a herd of Paso Fino ponies, the remaining band of wild horses brought by the Spaniards to Cuba. As they befriend them they know they are endangering the horses' lives. The ruthless landowner has claimed the mountain as his own and has started clearing the land for coffee plantations. His daughter discovers the two friends, sees the horses, and says they belong to her father. After falling from the stallion she is riding, Ernestina and Enriquito help her and strike a bargain to save the wild horses. She gives them a locket as a promise to keep her side of the bargain, but they know it is only a matter of time and devise an intricate plan to scare the horses so they never trust humans again. Enriquito learns the locket was made by his uncle and stolen from his family. In proving the original ownership he also proves the landowner has falsified maps and does not own the mountain. The story skillfully deals with social injustice, environmental stewardship, Cuban culture, strong families, an enduring friendship, and adventure.
Kirkus Reviews
Enriquito and Ernestina are good friends in a small rural village in pre-revolutionary Cuba. On a morning when sardines rain from the sky, they also meet Aguas Clara, la Davinadora on her way to Havana, floating on a couch. Riding along for awhile, the two friends learn a bit about their future. Real life is full of family stories, and saving wild ponies from the evil machinations of the rich landowner in the area whose daughter is as greedy as her father. Soon Enriquito and Ernestina are caught up in keeping the wild ponies safe, understanding the lessons from the past and keeping themselves out of jail. The courtroom scene at the end maintains elements of magical realism as well as a denouement worthy of a movie of the week. The happy ending is never in doubt, but it's a lot of fun getting there. The Cuban cultural elements add flavor and spice to what is an essentially familiar melodramatic plot. Nostalgia in a fresh form. (Fiction. 10-14)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596431669
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
03/06/2007
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.53(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Enrique's panoramas and landscapes of his native Cuba have been shown in many museums and galleries. A noted portrait painter, Enrique Flores-Galbis lectures at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. This is his first book.

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Raining Sardines 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Enrique Flores paints a vivid world with his words in 'Raining Sardines'. This book is a fun, great read for 'young' readers of all ages. I highly recommend it - que chévere.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book by an extremely talented writer. Its intended to be a children's book but I highly recommend it for people of all ages.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yesterday i read 'Raining Sardines'. I have an interest in foreign based books. I had always wondered what cuba was like before Castro come into leading. This mystery felt very well planned and not once was there a sense of confusion. Enrique Flores Galbis in my opinion took great care in leaving no gaps of a lost scene. With such great detail he left room for your own imagination but still put beautiful poetic details. I recommend this book to anyone looking for a heart warming, edge of your seat mystery about stolen ponies, two best friend's childhood adventures and of course cuba at its greatest. This book is suitable for all ages but would be best for ages 10-15 at best.