Raising Llamas: Facts About Raising Llamas [NOOK Book]

Overview

A friendly companion, llamas are commonly used as pack animals in mountainous areas, State and National Parks, and for those who just enjoy hiking or backpacking. Capable of carrying 1/3 of their body weight, around a total of 80 to 100 pounds, llamas are a quiet and willing companion when hiking. With their two toed foot, llamas are agile and sure-footed. And, as a bonus feature, the soft pad on the bottom of their foot results in a low impact on the environment. They are still commonly used today as a beast of ...
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Raising Llamas: Facts About Raising Llamas

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Overview

A friendly companion, llamas are commonly used as pack animals in mountainous areas, State and National Parks, and for those who just enjoy hiking or backpacking. Capable of carrying 1/3 of their body weight, around a total of 80 to 100 pounds, llamas are a quiet and willing companion when hiking. With their two toed foot, llamas are agile and sure-footed. And, as a bonus feature, the soft pad on the bottom of their foot results in a low impact on the environment. They are still commonly used today as a beast of burden in their native country of South America.

Llamas are one of four main species of New World camelids. The other three species are the alpaca, guanaco and vicuna. These species are thought to have originated from a common ancestor that came across the Bering Strait land bridge. Camelids are thought to be related to Bactrian and Dromedary camels of Asia. The high dependence of Incan Indians of South America on llamas and alpacas for food and fiber is analogous to the Plains Indians of North America and their relationship to the bison. Incas carried their relationship with llamas a step further through domestication and controlled breeding for beasts of burden. With the collapse of Incan culture, llamas were nearly pushed into extinction and only survived in the harsh upper regions of their natural territory. The last 25 years have seen a resurgence of interest in llamas, especially in the United States.

Llamas are first and foremost pets and companions. They are ideally suited to this task because of their predictable low-key temperament, intelligence and ease of maintenance. Wilderness packing is probably the second greatest demand for llamas. Llamas make ideal pack animals for the western mountainous regions of the United States because of their inherent thriftiness in this climate, their low-cost maintenance and their durability as pack animals. Wool may represent another use for llamas, although, with a large number of natural and synthetic substitutes for wool, it seems unlikely that llama herds will be maintained for wool production. In some instances, llamas have been used as a sheep guards against predators. The potential of this market has not yet been verified, but may hold some promise in the future. In some foreign countries, where the resident llama population is quite high, there is interest in using llamas as a food source. But, because of a relatively low population of llamas in the United States (about 35,000 animals in 1992) and a relatively high price, llamas are not likely to become a food source for Americans.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013101227
  • Publisher: Cindy
  • Publication date: 8/16/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 13
  • Sales rank: 1,064,412
  • File size: 136 KB

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Very helpful if your raising a llama

    This book has many things you need know if your a first time llama owner. However, it may not be the best if your looking for facts, stories, or pictures of llamas. This books best purpose is to teach you the elements of raising a llama.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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