Raising Your Emotional Intelligence: A Practical Guide

Overview

Employing exercises, self-tests, case studies, and step-by-step instructions, Segal shows readers how to listen to their intuition and their body's messages, make those signals part of their decision-making process, and thus realize the full benefit of their emotional resources.

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Overview

Employing exercises, self-tests, case studies, and step-by-step instructions, Segal shows readers how to listen to their intuition and their body's messages, make those signals part of their decision-making process, and thus realize the full benefit of their emotional resources.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Emotional intelligence, defined by Daniel Goleman as "abilities such as being able to motivate oneself and persist in the face of frustrations; to control impulse and delay gratification; to regulate one's moods and keep distress from swamping the ability to think; to empathize and to hope," has been shown to be a powerful predictor of success in life. Following on Goleman's excellent best seller, Emotional Intelligence (LJ 9/1/95), are these two books purporting to provide a program for raising one's own E.Q. and that of one's children. In both cases, the authors state that their work, while relevant to Goleman's ideas, is based on decades of experience. However, Segal's (Living Beyond Fear, Borgo, 1987) book seems to be a rehash of the old gestalt notion that the root of most psychological distress is an inability to feel one's "true" emotionsan unproved assertion that has little relevance to Goleman's definition. Readers interested in Goleman's emotional intelligence will be disappointedor badly misledby Segal's book. Recommended only for public libraries with a large and dedicated audience for titles by authors like Wayne Dyer and Robert Covey. The author of numerous works in psychology, Shapiro, on the other hand, actually seems to address the issues included in Goleman's definition. Unlike so many parenting books full of generalizations, this title includes specific ideas for games, projects, and even computer games. Highly recommended for all parenting collections.Mary Ann Hughes, Neill P.L., Pullman, Wash.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805051513
  • Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/28/2000
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,401,625
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 3
1 It's Smart to Feel 7
2 Why Johnny (and Jenny) Can't Feel 25
3 Welcome to the Elementary School of the Heart 53
4 Accepting What You Feel 78
5 Living in the Moment: Active Emotional Awareness 101
6 Becoming Empathic: How Intelligence Becomes Wisdom 124
7 The High EQ in Love 149
8 The High EQ at Work 177
9 The High EQ at Home 206
10 A 10-Step Curriculum for Emotional Wisdom 235
11 Graduation! 237
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