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Ralph S. Mouse (Ralph Mouse Series #3) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)
     

Ralph S. Mouse (Ralph Mouse Series #3) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

4.3 102
by Beverly Cleary, Paul Zelinsky (Illustrator)
 

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"Look, Ryan," he said. "I'm in trouble and I don't have time to tell you about it. Just take me and my motorcycle with you, and don't ask questions."

"To school?" Ryan was surprised.

Ralph's pesky cousins are wrecking his motorcycle, and his janitor friend, Matt, is in trouble because there seem to be mice in the hotel. All in all things

Overview

"Look, Ryan," he said. "I'm in trouble and I don't have time to tell you about it. Just take me and my motorcycle with you, and don't ask questions."

"To school?" Ryan was surprised.

Ralph's pesky cousins are wrecking his motorcycle, and his janitor friend, Matt, is in trouble because there seem to be mice in the hotel. All in all things are not going well at the Mountain View Inn. So Ralph persuades his young pal Ryan to take him to school. Ralph is an instant hit with Ryan's classmates. But he doesn't like being forced to run through a maze or the threat of an exterminator coming to the school. Worst of all, Ryan gets into a fight with a classmate, and Ralph's precious motorcycle is broken. Is Ralph S. Mouse smart enough to steer this sad situation to a happy ending?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The intrepid mouse Ralph, who first appeared in The Motorcycle and the Mouse, continues his adventures in this third book of the author's entertaining series. Ralph lives at the Mountain View Inn, a hotel that has seen better days. He and Ryan, the son of the new hotel housekeeper, are friends. When Ralph gets fed up with his pesky cousins and nagging relatives, he asks Ryan to take him to school. Ralph envisions riding his motorcycle up and down the school's smooth hallways at night when all the children have gone home. Things don't work out exactly as planned when one of the girls in Ryan's class discovers him. Ralph becomes a class project, which is boring and bothersome. But Ralph learns a lot at school and proves that he is quite a smart mouse indeed. 2000 (orig. 1982), HarperTrophy/HarperCollins, $5.95. Ages 7 to 11. Reviewer: Jeanne K. Pettenati AGES: 7 8 9 10 11

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780881032772
Publisher:
Demco Media
Publication date:
11/28/1993
Series:
Ralph Mouse Series , #3
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
1,138,797
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
860L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

A Dark and Snowy Night

Night winds, moaning around corners and whistling through cracks, dashed snow against the windows of the Mountain View Inn. Inside, a fire crackled in the stone fireplace. The grandfather clock, as old and tired as the inn itself, marked the passing of time with a slow tick . . . tock ... that seemed to say,, "Wait ... ing, wait ... ing."

Everyone in the lobby was waiting-the desk clerk, the handyman, old Matt, who also carried guests' luggage to their rooms, Ryan Bramble, the son of the hotel's new housekeeper, and Ralph, the mouse who lived under the grandfather clock.

The desk clerk dozed, waiting for guests who did not arrive. Matt leaned against the wall to watch television while he waited for the desk clerk to close up for the night. Ryan, sitting on the floor to watch television, waited for his mother to tell him to go to bed because he had to go to school the next day. Ralph, crouched beside Ryan, waited for the adults to leave so be could bring out his mouse-sized motorcycle. Unfortunately, Ralph's little brothers, sisters, and cousins, biding in the woodpile and behind the curtains were also waiting.

On the television set, a sports car crashed into a truck, shot off a clif and burst into flames.

"Wow!" Without taking his eyes from the screen Ryan said "There's a boy at school named Brad Kirby, who would really like this movie. He has a BMX bicycle for motocross racing, and his father sometimes drives him to school in a tow truck." A police car followed the sports car over the cliff before Ryan added, "Brad isn't very friendly to me. He's sort of a loner."

Ralph was more interestedin television than in Ryan's problems. "If I had a sports car like that," he said, "I wouldn't let it run off a cliff." -

Ralph was an unusual mouse. He had listened to so many children and watched so much television that he had learned to talk. Not everyone could understand him. Those who could were lonely children who shared Ralph's interest in fast cars and motorcycles and who took the trouble to listen. Other children, if they happened to glimpse Ralph, said, "I saw a mouse that squeked funny".

Matt was the only adult who understood Ralph. "Yes, sir, that mouse is a mouse in a million," he often told himself.

Ralph knew there were not really a million mice in the inn, although he had to admit that in wintertime the mouseholes were crowded, because his rough outdoor relatives moved inside to keep warm. Ralph's mother said they were a rowdy bunch that set a bad example for the more civilized indoor mice.

While Ralph and Ryan were enjoying a commercial for a truck that could zigzag without over-turning, Matt strolled into a room called the Jumping Frog Lounge and returned with a handful of popcorn. He dropped one kernal in front of Ralph.

"Thanks," said Ralph, who enjoyed nibbling popcorn while watching television.

As the commercial ended, Mrs. Bramble entered the lobby. "Come on, my boy," she said to Ryan. "It's past your bedtime. You know the manager doesn't like you hanging around the lobby."

"Aw, Mom, just let me watch the end of the

program," pleaded Ryan. "I'll leave if any guests arrive."

At that moment, the rattle and crunch of a car with chains on its tires was heard. Ryan rose and walked backward out of the lobby so he wouldn't miss the high speed, siren-screeming chase on the television screen. As he left, he gave Ralph a little wave with his fingertips, a wave no on else would notice. Ralph wished Ryan could stay up all night like a mouse.

As the car stopped in front of the hotel and the desk clerk roused himself, Ralph scurried under the grandfather clock to the nest he had made from chewed-up Kleenex, a lost lift-ticket, and a few bits of carpet fringe he had nipped off when no one was looking. Beside his nest rested his two precious possessions: a little red motorcycle and a crash helmet made from half a ping-pong ball lined with thistle-down, gifts of a boy who had once stayed in the hotel.

Above Ralph the clock began to grind and groan and strike, bong ... bong, as if it had to summon strength for each stroke. Ralph dreaded the sound even though it was the reason he lived under the clock. The noise terrified his little relatives who thought the clock was out to get them. As long as they feared the clock, Ralph's motorcycle was safe.

The car door slammed. Feet stomped on the porch. When Matt opened the door to let two people blow into the lobby, a blast of freezing air sent Ralph's nest swirling around in bits. Never mind, thought Ralph peeking out at two pair of boots, the kind known as waffle stompers, which had thick treads that held snow.

"Do you have a room for the night?" the owner of the larger boots asked the desk clerk.

"H-mm, let's see," murmured the clerk who always behaved as if the hotel might be full even though he knew it was not.

Stop pretending, thought Ralph, who was tired of waiting.

"

Well. . . ." The desk clerk ended the suspense. I can let you have room 207. just fill out this card, please."

Ralph's keen ears heard the scratch of a pen and the rattle of a key. He winced when the clerk banged the bell on the desk for Matt, even though Matt was standing right there, waiting to carry the guests' bags.

"Never mind, said one of the guests to Matt. "We can find our room." The pair picked up their luggage and stepped into the elevator, leaving behind puddles of melted snow.

"Cheapskates," muttered Matt. Guests at this hotel often insisted on carrying luggage to avoid tipping him.

After the elevator door closed Ralph worried that the puddles might dry before he had the lobby to himself. Time dragged on. The man in the red vest who worked in the jumping Frog Lounge came out, yawned, and remarked that he might as well close for the night. The television station went off the air. The desk clerk locked the front door and left. If any more guests arrived, they would have to ring the night bell. Matt began to turn out the lights.

At last! Ralph threw his leg over his motorcycle, adjusted the rubber band that held his crash helmet in place, and grasped his tail so that it would not become tangled in his spokes. Then,because as everyone knows,a toy motorcycle moves when someone makes a noise like a motorcycle, Ralph took a deep breath, went Pb-b-b, b-b-b, and shot out from under the clock. Gradually he picked up speed and zoomed through a puddle. Wings of water .fanned out from -his wheels. It was a thrilling experience.

All of Ralph's little brothers, sisters, and cousins,, hoping Matt would not notice them in the dim light, popped out from their hiding places to watch. Of course,, Ralph had to show off. He took deeper breaths and rode faster, making puddles splash higher and leaving tiny tire tracks on the dry linoleum. Matt, who was banking the fire for the night, laid down the poker to enjoy the sight.

Unfortunately, the little relatives were not satisfied. Not now. Once Ralph's indoor relatives had been happy to have Ralph push them up and down the halls on his motorcycle, but this treat was not enough for his rowdy outdoor relatives.

Ralph S. Mouse. Copyright © by Beverly Cleary. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

Beverly Cleary was born in McMinnville, Oregon, and, until she was old enough to attend school, lived on a farm in Yamhill, a town so small it had no library. Her mother arranged with the State Library to have books sent to Yamhill and acted as librarian in a lodge room upstairs over a bank. There young Beverly learned to love books. However, when the family moved to Portland, Beverly soon found herself in the grammar school's low reading circle, an experience that has given her sympathy for the problems of struggling readers.

By the third grade she had conquered reading and spent much of her childhood either with books or on her way to and from the public library. Before long her school librarian was suggesting that she should write for boys and girls when she grew up. The idea appealed to her, and she decided that someday she would write the books she longed to read but was unable to find on the library shelves, funny stories about her neighborhood and the sort of children she knew. And so Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, Ellen Tebbits, and her other beloved characters were born.

When children ask Mrs. Cleary where she finds her ideas, she replies, "From my own experience and from the world around me." She included a passage about the D.E.A.R. program in Ramona Quimby, Age 8 (second chapter) because she was inspired by letters she received from children who participated in "Drop Everything and Read" activities. Their interest and enthusiasm encouraged her to provide the same experience to Ramona, who enjoys D.E.A.R. time with the rest of her class.

Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the 2003 National Medal of Artfrom the National Endowment of the Arts and the 1984 John Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw. Her Ramona and Her Father and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 were named 1978 and 1982 Newbery Honor Books, respectively.

Among Mrs. Cleary's other awards are the American Library Association's 1975 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, the Catholic Library Association's 1980 Regina Medal, and the University of Southern Mississippi's 1982 Silver Medallion, all presented in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature. In addition, Mrs. Cleary was the 1984 United States author nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Award, a prestigious international award.

Equally important are the more than 35 statewide awards Mrs. Cleary's books have received based on the direct votes of her young readers. In 2000, to honor her invaluable contributions to children's literature, Beverly Cleary was named a "Living Legend" by the Library of Congress. This witty and warm author is truly an international favorite. Mrs. Cleary's books appear in over twenty countries in fourteen languages and her characters, including Henry Huggins, Ellen Tebbits, Otis Spofford, and Beezus and Ramona Quimby, as well as Ribsy, Socks, and Ralph S. Mouse, have delighted children for generations. And her popularity has not diminished. HarperCollins Children's Books recently announced that the film option for Cleary's classic book character, Ramona Quimby, had been sold to Fox 2000 and Denise DiNovi Productions. In addition, Portland, Oregon has proudly created The Beverly Cleary Sculpture Garden for Children featuring bronze statues of Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ribsy, in the park where Beverly used to play.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Carmel, California
Date of Birth:
April 12, 1916
Place of Birth:
McMinnville, Oregon
Education:
B.A., University of California-Berkeley, 1938; B.A. in librarianship, University of Washington (Seattle), 1939

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Ralph S. Mouse 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 102 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I like this book because there are interesting things. Like Ralph is a mouse and he rides a motorcycle around the lobby. My favorite part of the book was when he bit into Melissa¿s boot. I think kids will like this book because there are cool things in it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ralph is tired of his relatives trying to make him share his beloved motorcycle. And he's afraid zooming through the mud puddles in the lobby of the inn where he lives has gotten his friend Matt in trouble. So with the help of his human friend Ralph runs away, to Irwin J. Sneed Elementary School, where there are long halls without carpet to ride on and plenty of good things to eat. Except that the students of Room 5 turns Ralph into a class project and an article in the town paper accuses the school of being infested with mice! And worst of all now Ralph's motorcycle is broken and he has no way to get back home. Ralph S. Mouse is a classic kid's chapter book. While amusing at times I found Ralph to be pouty and selfish, not exactly a hero. Cleary does mention the reality of mice (being vermin and all), but doesn't quite manage to set Ralph apart, other than his intelligence and his abilities to ride a motorcycle and speak (but only to certain, lonely children). My son enjoyed being read chapters of Ralph at night, but didn't connect with Ralph's pouting or anger. He was most interested in the beginning and the end, with a lull of interest in the surly middle parts. Ralph would probably most interest children who are also feeling surly, angry, and like the world is against them. Its strength is in showing kids that they're not alone in those feelings and teaching them to look for ways to solve their problems, because they might not be as bad as it seems.
ducknme More than 1 year ago
I've been reading this series to my six year old son and he loves it! And I've been enjoying is too!
Guest More than 1 year ago
wow,this book is amazing!! although when i was in school i hated reading it because my teacher made us do 3 paged questions and all this junk...but i love this book!! i recommend this book to kids of all ages! it has humor,detail,and...a happy ending!!
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
Many children have grown up reading books by Beverly Cleary. They couldn't have better companions as this author's stories are warm, entertaining, and filled with ideas that young readers can wrap their minds around. Some of our favorites are in the Ramona series, which were named Newbery Honor books and also adapted for television. So great is this author's popularity that her stories appear in 14 languages and her characters often become a part of our language. A case in point is Ralph S. Mouse whose adventures have been shown on ABC-TV. In this particular story there is no longer peace and quiet at the Mountain View Inn where Ralph lives. His pal, the handyman, is in trouble because there are mice at the Inn, so Ralph thinks he'd best skedaddle. Fortunately for Ralph he has some young friends, children who understand him. One of these is Ryan who agrees to take Ralph and his motorcycle to school with him. Just think of those polished floors on which Ralph can ride his motorcycle! Unfortunately, his motorcycle is broken when Ryan and a classmate get into a shoving match. Further, Ralph is put on display. School isn't so great after all. What's a mouse, even one as smart as Ralph to do? Actor B. D. Wong made his Broadway debut in M. Butterfly. For this performance he received the Tony Award, Drama Desk Award, Outer Critics Circle Award, Clarence Derwent Award, and Theater World Award. He is the only actor to be so honored. He merits another shelf of awards for his narration of Ralph S. Mouse. He brings whimsy and life to his reading. For fans of Ralph, Mr. Wong also reads Mouse and the Motorcycle and Runaway Ralph. All are highly recommended! - Gail Cooke
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book it was so awesome i loved the part were that guy brings the mouse to school i could just read this book over and over agian like1234567890 times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
They hunt together. Doe stalks a mouse and Sea stalks a rabbit.
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Obeys again
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love you
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love Beverly Clearly
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good Book
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Say cheese
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Waits~mousekit
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ralph is here this is one amazing book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
G
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of my favorites.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ralph is a favorite for all ages
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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