Ramona Forever

( 124 )

Overview

What happens next?

Ramona's life changes the moment Howie Kemp's mysterious uncle arrives from Saudi Arabia. Howie and his sister, Willa Jean, talk only about Uncle Hobart. Ramona's mother makes secret phone calls and stops eating dessert, and Aunt Bea is hiding something, too. Whatever surprises are in store, Ramona is determined to be happy and helpful. Whether she's pleasant, brave, or blunderful, she's always wonderful Ramona—forever!

...
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Ramona Forever

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Overview

What happens next?

Ramona's life changes the moment Howie Kemp's mysterious uncle arrives from Saudi Arabia. Howie and his sister, Willa Jean, talk only about Uncle Hobart. Ramona's mother makes secret phone calls and stops eating dessert, and Aunt Bea is hiding something, too. Whatever surprises are in store, Ramona is determined to be happy and helpful. Whether she's pleasant, brave, or blunderful, she's always wonderful Ramona—forever!

Ramona's year in third grade is highlighted by the arrival of Howie's rich uncle, a change in her after-school situation, a surprise wedding, a death and a new arrival in the family, and her father's getting a job.

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Editorial Reviews

Booklist
“Happy days, Ramona is back! Cleary provides laugh-out-loud scenes, memorable characters, and keen perceptions. When it comes to writing books kids love, nobody does it better.”
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In Newbery Medalist Cleary's seventh book about the Quimbys, eight-year-old Ramona and the whole family are caught up in momentous events. Beezus and Ramona share sorrows and help each other instead of tiffing when their dear cat dies. They worry about the consequences if their aunt marries a man they're not sure they like, about Mr. Quimby's new job taking them to a distant town. Most of all, Ramona wonders about her status when Mrs. Quimby has a new baby. PW correctly predicted that the ``gently humorous story, with Tiegreen's drawings emphasizing the main happenings,'' would be another of the author's bestsellers. 812
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780380709601
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/28/1995
  • Series: Ramona Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 96,828
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 810L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.14 (w) x 7.76 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Meet the Author

Beverly Cleary

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most popular authors. Born in McMinnville, Oregon, she lived on a farm in Yamhill until she was six and then moved to Portland. After college, as the children's librarian in Yakima, Washington, she was challenged to find stories for non-readers. She wrote her first book, Henry Huggins, inresponse to a boy's question, "Where are the books about kids like us?"

Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the Amercan Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature.

Her Dear Mr. Henshaw was awarded the 1984 John Newbery Medal, and both Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. In addition, her books have won more than thirty-five statewide awards based on the votes of her young readers. Her characters, including Henry Huggins, Ellen Tebbits, Otis Spofford, and Beezus and Ramona Quimby, as well as Ribsy, Socks, and Ralph S. Mouse, have delighted children for generations. Mrs. Cleary lives in coastal California.

Jaqueline Rogers has been a professional children's book illustrator for more than twenty years and has worked on nearly one hundred children's books.

Biography

Beverly Cleary was inadvertently doing market research for her books before she wrote them, as a young children’s librarian in Yakima, Washington. Cleary heard a lot about what kids were and weren’t responding to in literature, and she thought of her library patrons when she later sat down to write her first book.

Henry Huggins, published in 1950, was an effort to represent kids like the ones in Yakima and like the ones in her childhood neighborhood in Oregon. The bunch from Klickitat Street live in modest houses in a quiet neighborhood, but they’re busy: busy with rambunctious dogs (one Ribsy, to be precise), paper routes, robot building, school, bicycle acquisitions, and other projects. Cleary was particularly sensitive to the boys from her library days who complained that they could find nothing of interest to read – and Ralph and the Motorcycle was inspired by her son, who in fourth grade said he wanted to read about motorcycles. Fifteen years after her Henry books, Cleary would concoct the delightful story of a boy who teaches Ralph to ride his red toy motorcycle.

Cleary’s best known character, however, is a girl: Ramona Quimby, the sometimes difficult but always entertaining little sister whom Cleary follows from kindergarten to fourth grade in a series of books. Ramona is a Henry Huggins neighbor who, with her sister, got her first proper introduction in Beezus and Ramona, adding a dimension of sibling dynamics to the adventures on Klickitat Street. Cleary’s stories, so simple and so true, deftly portrayed the exasperation and exuberance of being a kid. Finally, an author seemed to understand perfectly about bossy/pesty siblings, unfair teachers, playmate politics, the joys of clubhouses and the perils of sub-mattress monsters.

Cleary is one of the rare children’s authors who has been able to engage both boys and girls on their own terms, mostly through either Henry Huggins or Ramona and Beezus. She has not limited herself to those characters, though. In 1983, she won the Newbery Medal with Dear Mr. Henshaw, the story of a boy coping with his parents’ divorce, as told through his journal entries and correspondence with his favorite author. She has also written a few books for older girls (Fifteen, The Luckiest Girl, Sister of the Bride, and Jean and Johnny) mostly focusing on first love and family relationships. A set of books for beginning readers stars four-year-old twins Jimmy and Janet.

Some of Cleary’s books – particularly her titles for young adults – may seem somewhat alien to kids whose daily lives don’t feature soda fountains, bottles of ink, or even learning cursive. Still, the author’s stories and characters stand the test of time; and she nails the basic concerns of childhood and adolescence. Her books (particularly the more modern Ramona series, which touches on the repercussions of a father’s job loss and a mother’s return to work) remain relevant classics.

Cleary has said in an essay that she wrote her two autobiographical books, A Girl from Yamhill and My Own Two Feet, "because I wanted to tell young readers what life was like in safer, simpler, less-prosperous times, so different from today." She has conveyed that safer, simpler era -- still fraught with its own timeless concerns -- to children in her fiction as well, more than half a century after her first books were released.

Good To Know

Word processing is not Cleary's style. She writes, "I write in longhand on yellow legal pads. Some pages turn out right the first time (hooray!), some pages I revise once or twice and some I revise half-a-dozen times. I then attack my enemy the typewriter and produce a badly typed manuscript which I take to a typist whose fingers somehow hit the right keys. No, I do not use a computer. Everybody asks."

Cleary usually starts her books on January 2.

Up until she was six, Cleary lived in Yamhill, Oregon -- a town so small it had no library. Cleary's mother took up the job of librarian, asking for books to be sent from the state branch and lending them out from a lodge room over a bank. It was, Clearly remembers, "a dingy room filled with shabby leather-covered chairs and smelling of stale cigar smoke. The books were shelved in a donated china cabinet. It was there I made the most magical discovery: There were books written especially for children!"

Cleary authored a series of tie-in books in the early 1960s for classic TV show Leave It to Beaver.

Cleary's books appear in over 20 countries in 14 languages.

Cleary's book The Luckiest Girl is based in part on her own young adulthood, when a cousin of her mother's offered to take Beverly for the summer and have her attend Chaffey Junior College in Ontario, California. Cleary went from there to the University of California at Berkeley.

The actress Sarah Polley got her start playing Ramona in the late ‘80s TV series. Says Cleary in a Q & A on her web site: “I won’t let go of the rights for television productions unless I have script approval. There have been companies that have wanted the movie rights to Ramona, but they won’t let me have script approval, and so I say no. I did have script approval for the television productions of the Ramona series…. I thought Sarah Polley was a good little actress, a real little professional.”

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    1. Also Known As:
      Beverly Atlee Bunn (birth name)
    2. Hometown:
      Carmel, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 12, 1916
    2. Place of Birth:
      McMinnville, Oregon
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of California-Berkeley, 1938; B.A. in librarianship, University of Washington (Seattle), 1939

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Rich Uncle

"Guess what?" Ramona Quimby asked one Friday evening when her Aunt Beatrice dropped by to show off her new ski clothes and to stay for supper. Ramona's mother, father, and big sister Beezus, whose real name was Beatrice, paid no attention and went on eating. Picky-picky, the cat, meowed through the basement door, asking to share the meal.

Aunt Beatrice, who taught third grade, knew how to behave toward her third-grade niece.

"What?" she asked, laying down her fork as if she expected to be astounded by Ramona's news.

Ramona took a deep breath and announced, "Howie Kemp's rich uncle is coming to visit," Except for Aunt Bea, her family was not as curious as Ramona had hoped. She plunged on anyway because she was happy for her friend. "Howie's grandmother is really excited, and so are Howie and Willa Jean." And so, to be truthful, was Ramona, who disliked having to go to the Kemps' house after school, where Howie's grandmother looked after her grandchildren and Ramona while the two mothers were at work. A rich uncle, even someone else's rich uncle, should make those long after-school hours more interesting.

"I didn't know Howie had a rich uncle," said Mrs. Quimby.

"He's Howie'sfather's little brother, only now he's big," explained Ramona.

"Why, that must be Hobart Kemp," said Aunt Beatrice. "He was in my class in high school."

"Oh, yes. I remember. That boy with the blond curly hair who played baseball." Mrs. Quimby motioned to her daughters to clear away the plates. "All the girls said he was cute."

"That's the one," said Aunt Bea. "He used to chew licorice and spit on thegrass to make the principal think be was chewing tobacco like a professional baseball player, which was what he wanted to be."

"Where's this cute licorice-chewing uncle coming from, and how did he get so rich?" asked Ramona's father, beginning to be interested. "Playing baseball?"

"He's coming from—" Ramona frowned. "I can't remember the name, but it sounds like a fairy tale and has camels." Narnia? Never-never-land? No, those names weren't right.

"Saudi Arabia," said Beezus, who also went to the Kemps' after school. Being in junior high school, she could take her time getting there.

"Yes, that's it!" Ramona wished she had remembered first. "Howie says he's bringing thewhole family Presents." She imagined bags ofgold like those in The Arabian Nights, whichBeezus had read to her. Of course, nobody carried around bags of gold today, but she enjoyedimagining them.

" What's Howie's uncle doing in Saudi Arabia?" asked Mr. Quimby. "Besides spitting in the sand?"

"Daddy, don't besilly," said Ramona. "I don't know exactly." Now that she was the center of attention, she wished she had more information. "Something about oil. Drills or rigs or something. Howie understands all about it. His uncle earned a lot of money." The Quimbys were a family who had to worry about money.

"Oh, that kind of rich," said Mr. Quimby thought maybe a long-lost uncle had died and left him a castle full of servants, jewels, and rare old wines."

"Daddy, that's so old-fashioned," said Ramona. "That's only in books."

The conversation drifted off, leaving Ramona behind. Her father, who would earn his teaching credential in June, said he was inquiring around for schools that needed an art teacher, and he also told about the problems of the men who worked in the same frozen-food warehouse where he worked on weekends at below-freezing temperatures. Mrs. Quimby told about two people who got into an argument over a parking space at the doctor's office where she worked. Aunt Bea talked about a man named Michael who had invited her to go skiing and was the reason she had bought new ski clothes. Beezus wondered aloud if Michael would ask Aunt Bea to marry him. Aunt Bea laughed at that, saying she had known him only two weeks, but since this was January, there were several months of skiing left and there was no telling what might happen.

No more was said about Howie's uncle that evening. Days went by. Uncle Hobart didn't come and didn't come. Every evening Mr. Quimby asked, "Has Old Moneybags arrived?" And Ramona had to say no.

Finally one morning, as Ramona and Howie were waiting for the school bus, Ramona said, I don't think you have a rich uncle at all. I think you made him up."

Howie said he did too have a rich uncle. Even little Willa Jean, when Ramona went to the Kemps' after school, talked about Uncle Hobart and the presents he was bringing. Ramona informed Howie and Willa Jean rather crossly that her mother said it wasn't nice to talk about other people's money. They paid no attention—after all, he was their very own uncle, not Ramona's—and went right on talking about Uncle Hobart this and Uncle Hobart that. Uncle Hobart had landed in New York. He had actually telephoned, live and in person. Uncle Hobart was driving across the country. Uncle Hobart was delayed by a storm in the Rockies. Ramona wished she had never heard of Uncle Hobart.

Then, one day after school, Ramona and Howie saw a muddy van parked on the Kemps' driveway.

"It' Uncle Hobart!" Howie shouted, and began to run.Ramona took her time.

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Reading Group Guide

Introduction:

From the moment Howie Kemp's mysterious "rich" Uncle Hobart arrives from Saudi Arabia, everything around Ramona Quimby seems to be changing. Howie and his sister Willa Jean talk only about Uncle Hobart. Ramona's mother and Aunt Bea seem to be keeping secrets. Life for Ramona, now a grown-up third-grader, is full of beginnings and discoveries and surprises--one very big surprise and one very small, but just as special!

Through all the happiness and confusion, and some small amounts of sadness, too, Ramona tries hard to be pleasant and helpful. Whether she's pleasant or pesty, brave or blunderful, she's always wonderful Ramona--forever!

Discussion Questions:

  1. Ramona's disappointment with Howie's Uncle Hobart turns into actual dislike when he sings a song with her name in it to tease her. Is it just that Ramona doesn't like adults who tease, or is there something about the circumstances in which she meets Uncle Hobart that makes things awkward?
  2. Why is it so disquieting for Ramona to realize that Howie's grandmother does not like her? Do you think Mrs. Quimby is right when she says that maybe Howie's grandmother would rather not be a sitter for Ramona or for her grandchildren? Why do you suppose Ramona hadn't thought of that?
  3. When Ramona and Beezus try going home instead of to the Kemps' house after school, what happens to interrupt their two-day record of being good? How does it bring the sisters closer to one another? What is Mr. and Mrs. Quimby's reaction when they hear about what the girls have had to handle all by themselves?
  4. Ramona thinks that maybe she would rather have another catthan a younger brother or sister, but then her mother explains the special place of the middle child. Do you remember where it is? Do you agree with Mrs. Quimby?
  5. After some mysterious phone calls to Mrs. Quimby, Howie's Uncle Hobart starts seeing Aunt Beatrice. What is Ramona's reaction and why?
  6. What do you think of Uncle Hobart's way of shopping for the wedding after he volunteers to take care of everything? Why is Ramona's opinion of him starting to change?
  7. How does Ramona save the day during the wedding ceremony?
  8. Even though she gets a slight case of siblingitis when the new baby is born, Ramona is definitely winning at the difficult job of growing up. How can we tell?
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 124 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(91)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(9)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 126 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2005

    An Old Favorite

    Maybe I like this book because it has serious sentimental value to me. It was the first 'chapter book' I got as a 5 year old, and my dad read it to me every night for a week. This book made me love reading, and introduced me to the character of Ramona. Simply put, this book is beyond mere words like 'funny' 'good' or 'awesome.' This book is still a favorite of mine, even though I'm now in college. Do yourself or your kids a favor and read it.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 6, 2010

    Review: Ramona Forever By: Beverly Cleary (GREAT!)

    The book Ramona Forever was written by Beverly Cleary. This book is about a little girl who goes through a lot with her family. In my opinion the book was great! Very interesting and kept me interested. In Ramona forever Ramona and her best friend Howie go to his grand mothers after school everyday. When Howie's uncle and Ramona's aunt drops in things start to change. Ramona no longer wants to stay at Howie's grandmothers after school so Beezus, Ramona's sister comes home after school every day to watch her. Everything changes when there are a few members added to the family. In this story the main characters are Ramona, Beezus, Howie, Mr. and Mrs. Quimby, Hobart, Raberta and Willa jean. The Conflict in the story is all the different events and Ramona trying to fix all the problems The protagonist would have to be Ramona she does some bad things but she also does good things. She saves the day lots of times. Ramona is very important to this book because she helps with everything she can. She helps Willa jean with her present from Uncle Hobart; she helps her mother when she's pregnant. Her and Beezus have a funeral for their cat all by them self. She is just very important. This story reminds me of Junie b. Jones. Junie B. is just like Ramona. She wants to help with anything and everything. Junie B's Mom and Ramona's mom has a baby. All the characters resemble the other in all different kinds of ways. When I think of Ramona I also think of Junie B. My opinion of this book was great very interesting. I enjoyed reading this because I used to love Junie B Jones and this reminds me so much of it, but there were parts I did not like. I didn't like how it ended just kind of ended at a random part. Which I think the author should have did differently. I would most definitely recommend this to book to others because it is so unique in all kinds of ways like telling a story of peoples like in an all new way! I enjoyed it very much!!

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Love it

    I love ramona and i want all the books

    7 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 8, 2011

    Ramona is Back!

    It was such a great book! I like it so much better than the movie! Ramona meets a girl named daisy and funny things happen. Totally worth the price!

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 24, 2011

    Ramona forever is a great book!

    I like all of the bevery cleary books. I like Ramona forever because ms.quimby has a baby. I also like this book because aunt bea was geting married to ramonas friend howies uncle. I also like that howies uncle becomes ramonas uncle too.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2003

    Cool!!!

    there are no words that express the whay i feel about this book. it was happy then sad then happy then sad. but in the end you could see that all the sad things that happened the story was for the good of the Quimblys. i thought that i was wonderful that Ramona Quimbly's mother is going to have a baby. and that Ramona's aunt Breatrice is getting married to Howlie's Uncle, Uncle Herbert.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    Ramona Forever

    If you like funny stories, then read Ramona Forever! This book is tottally awesome!!!! I truely recommmendit!!!!!!!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2012

    Gurl

    Califonya girl were undeniible

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    I love this book!

    I love all the Beverly Cleary books!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2013

    Ramona lover

    I love this book series and im 12,it is my favorite childrens book series its just so easy to relate to Ramona,i have a big sister sister just like Bezus and i think beverly cleary realy captured the feelings and opinions of real kids Ramonas age. Pleas read the book series,my 2 favorite are Ramona Forever and Ramonas World.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2013

    Ramona forever rocks

    I wish I could get it for free because it is a good and entertaining book

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    Love it

    Very good describing words, i think everyone should get it! It is worth it!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2012

    Great!

    Ramona has to go through many troubles and there Re manubsurprises. It starts when ramona meets howies uncle and then he proposes to her aunt. They try ro plan the wedding as quickly as possible.
    :)

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2012

    Cool

    It was an ok book

    2 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    Anonomoys

    I love this book

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    Stargurl

    Luv it perfect kid book moms and teachers every where

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2012

    Ramona

    She is so funny in some other book i have read

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

    bbe:best book ever!

    It's the best in the sieries

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2011

    Awesome!!!!!!!

    You must read it. I did. Iwant a ipod

    2 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2012

    love

    Teggtbjhhbn

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 126 Customer Reviews

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