×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Rancher: Photographs of the American West
  • Alternative view 1 of Rancher: Photographs of the American West
  • Alternative view 2 of Rancher: Photographs of the American West
     

Rancher: Photographs of the American West

by Carl Corey, Linda Hasselstrom (Introduction), Robert Dennis (Contribution by)
 
The American West of the late nineteenth century blazed off the pages of pulp novels as the Wild West: land of gunslingers, outlaws, and cowboys and Indians. The mythos continued in films, television, and even theme parks. But what was the West really? Where was it? What became of it? And is it even still there? These were some of the questions photographer Carl

Overview

The American West of the late nineteenth century blazed off the pages of pulp novels as the Wild West: land of gunslingers, outlaws, and cowboys and Indians. The mythos continued in films, television, and even theme parks. But what was the West really? Where was it? What became of it? And is it even still there? These were some of the questions photographer Carl Corey began asking himself during his travels capturing images of the vast landscapes and the people who inhabited them. In he 1996 glanced back over his untold forays to the West, both on assignment and for personal exploration and pondered if the core of the American West--that fiercely independent spirit that carved a livelihood out of an isolated, hardened land--had eroded long ago? In Rancher: Photographs of the American West, the award-winning photographer decided to answer his questions by studying the real heart and soul of the land: its people.

Corey set out to find a place that maintained an identity that could be uniquely defined as the American West. He found it in the great plains of Dakotas among the ranchers, the progeny of the men and women who left safe havens in the East to build better lives in the West. One hundred stunning color and black and white photographs in Rancher document the steps of a journey that spanned five years. While there are pictures of the land, the book is a testament to the proud people who worked it--American people, whose lives exemplify and define what was and resolutely continues to be the American West.

Introduced by Linda Hasselstrom, with poetry by Robert Dennis, Rancher portrays the real American West. Corey's observant eye captures the landscape that created these ranching people while exploring their daily lives and love of the land. This book offers an opportunity for strangers to look beyond the theme-park West of honky-tonk songs and colored straw hats to the reality of worn boots, stained headgear, and to the ranchers themselves--an honorable people of tenacity, pride, and constancy.

Carl Corey is a fine-art photographer and print maker. The recipient of more than 100 awards, he has been a veteran of assignment photography since 1979. Since 2000, Corey has directed his energy to more personal work concentrating on social and aesthetic issues involving the environment and the landscape. He lives in Hudson, Wisconsin.

In 1996 photographer Carl Corey glanced back over his untold forays to the West, both on assignment and for personal exploration, and asked the questions: What is it? Where is it? Is it even still there? Or could it be the heart and soul of the American West--that fiercely independent spirit that carved a livelihood out of an isolated, hardened land--eroded long ago?

Corey then set out to find a place that maintained an identity that could be uniquely defined as the American West. He found it in the Dakotas among the ranchers, the progeny of the men and women who left safe havens in the East to build better lives in the West. The photographs in Rancher document the steps of a journey that spanned five years. While there are pictures of the land, the book is a testament to the proud people who worked it-- American people, whose lives exemplify and define what was and continues to be the American West. In 1996 photographer Carl Corey glanced back over his untold forays to the West, both on assignment and for personal exploration, and asked the questions: What is it? Where is it? Is it even stillthere? Or could it be the heart and soul of the American West--that fiercely independent spiritthat carved a livelihood out of an isolated, hardened land--eroded long ago? Corey then set out to find a place that maintained an identity that could be uniquely defined as the American West. He found it in the Dakotas among the ranchers, the progeny of the men and women who left safe havens in the East to build better lives in the West. The photographs in Rancher document the steps of a journey that spanned five years. While there are pictures of the land, the book is atestament to the proud people who worked it-- American people, whose lives exemplify and define what was and continues to be the American West.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
With Rancher, Carl Corey adds one more classic to Western lode and lore - completing a body of work that was begun over a centruy ago by photgraphers such as William Henry Jackson and Timothy O'Sullivan, continued by Walker beans and Dorthea Lange, and brought into the 21st century by the likes of Paula Chamblee and Alec Soth -- M.J. Czarniecki III

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781593730581
Publisher:
Bunker Hill Publishing Inc
Publication date:
04/28/2007
Pages:
112
Sales rank:
1,082,827
Product dimensions:
12.38(w) x 9.41(h) x 0.72(d)

Meet the Author

Carl Corey is a fine-art photographer and print maker. The recipient of more than 100 awards, he has been a veteran of assignment photography since 1979. Since 2000, Corey has directed his energy to more personal work concentrating on social and aesthetic issues involving the environment and the landscape. He lives in Hudson, Wisconsin.

Linda M. Hasselstrom writes, ranches, conducts writing retreats, and hosts a botanic garden on the South Dakota ranch homesteaded by her grandfather in 1899.

Robert Dennis was a featured performer at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in 1989, 1990, and 1997.
He was featured in a cover story in the Winter, 2006 issue of Cowboy Magazine with an article and photographs by Jeri Dobrowski.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews