Rapid Application Development with Mozilla (Bruce Perens' Open Source Series)

Rapid Application Development with Mozilla (Bruce Perens' Open Source Series)

4.0 2
by Nigel McFarlane
     
 

ISBN-10: 0131423436

ISBN-13: 9780131423435

Pub. Date: 11/28/2003

Publisher: Prentice Hall

Rapid Application Development with Mozilla, part of the Bruce Perens Open Source Series, is a concise guide for any programmer who wants to learn the versatility and compatibility of Mozilla, an open source toolset with over a thousand objects and components. An additional feature of Rapid Application Development with Mozilla is the NoteTaker Web browser add-on-a

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Overview

Rapid Application Development with Mozilla, part of the Bruce Perens Open Source Series, is a concise guide for any programmer who wants to learn the versatility and compatibility of Mozilla, an open source toolset with over a thousand objects and components. An additional feature of Rapid Application Development with Mozilla is the NoteTaker Web browser add-on-a sample Mozilla application that is developed throughout the book. Written by Web and XML expert Nigel McFarlane, this book is the perfect addition to the library of any user-interface software engineer, cross-platform developer, or any programmer looking to discover the benefits of rapid application development.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780131423435
Publisher:
Prentice Hall
Publication date:
11/28/2003
Series:
Bruce Perens"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" Open Source Series
Pages:
800
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.70(d)

Table of Contents

1. Fundamental Concepts.

Understanding Mozilla Product Names. The XML Environment. Platform Concepts. The RAD Environment. Effective RAD Projects with Mozilla. Hands On: Cranking Up the Platform. Debug Corner: Debugging from Outside. Summary.

2. XUL Layout.

XUL Means Boxes. Principles of XUL Layout. Box Layout Tags. A Box Improvement: General-Purpose XUL Attributes. Good Coding Practices for XUL. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker Boilerplate. Debug Corner: Detecting Bad XUL. Summary.

3. Static Content.

XUL and HTML Compared. XUL Content Tags. Understanding Font Systems. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker Boilerplate. Debug Corner: The DOM Inspector. Summary.

4. First Widgets and Themes.

What Makes a Button a Button? The Origins of XUL Widgets. XUL Buttons. Themes and Skins. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker Buttons and Themes. Debug Corner: Diagnosing Buttons and Skins. Summary.

5. Scripting.

JavaScriptÕs Role as a Language. Standards, Browsers, and script. ECMAScript Edition 3. Language Enhancements. MozillaÕs Scriptable Interfaces. Hands On: NoteTaker Dynamic Content. Debug Corner: Script Diagnosis. Summary.

6. Events.

How Mozilla Handles Events. How Keystrokes Work. How Mouse Gestures Work. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker User Input. Debug Corner: Detecting Events. Summary.

7. Forms and Menus.

XUL and HTML Forms Compared. Where to Find Information on Menus. Forms. Menus. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker Events and Forms. Debug Corner: Diagnosing Events and Forms. Summary.

8. Navigation.

Navigation Systems. Navigation Widgets. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker Toolbars and Tabs. Debug Corner: Navigation Problems. Summary.

9. Commands.

Commands and Mozilla. Command Concepts. How Commands Are Started. Using Commands Via XUL. Using Commands Via the AOM. Commands and XPCOM Components. Existing Commands. Style Options. Hands On: Command Design. Debug Corner: Catching Unexpected Commands. Summary.

10. Windows and Panes.

Ordinary Windows. Popup Content. Dialog Boxes. JavaScript Window Creation. Embedding Documents in Panes. Mixing Documents. Managing Existing Windows. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker Dialogs. Debug Corner: Diagnostic Windows. Summary.

11. RDF.

Mozilla Uses of RDF. Learning Strategies for RDF. A Tutorial on Facts. RDF Syntax. RDF Examples. Hands On: NoteTaker: Data Models. Debug Corner: Dumping RDF. Summary.

12. Overlays and Chrome.

Overlays. The Chrome Registry. Persisting Window State. Related AOM and XPCOM Objects. Hands On: The NoteTaker Toolbar. Debug Corner: Overlay Tips. Summary.

13. Listboxes and Trees.

Text Grids. Listboxes. Trees. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker: The Keywords Panel. Debug Corner: Making and Work. Summary.

14. Templates.

An Example Template: Hello, World. Template Concepts. Template Construction. Common Query Patterns. Template Lifecycle. Scripting. Style Options. Hands On: NoteTaker Data Made Live. Debug Corner: Template Survival Guide. Summary.

15. XBL Bindings.

Binding Concepts. Constructing One XBL Binding. Combining Multiple Bindings. How Bindings Are Processed. Scripting. Style Options. Hands On: The Tag. Debug Corner: XBL Diagnosis. Summary.

16. XPCOM Objects.

Concepts and Terms. General-Purpose Scripting. Data Transfer. Web Scripting. Platform Configuration. Hands On: Saving and Loading NoteTaker Notes. Debug Corner: Working with Data Sources. Summary.

17. Deployment.

Overview of Install Strategies. Steps Toward Remote Deployment. Install Technologies. Hands On: Bundling Up NoteTaker. Debug Corner: Logging and Testing. Summary.

Index.

About the Author.

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Rapid Application Development with Mozilla (Bruce Perens' Open Source Series) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mozilla is earning new prominence in today's fast-paced Internet society. So for anyone who wants to know how to leverage Mozilla's power for their own Web applications, they need a decent practicum. Enter Rapid Application Development with Mozilla. This is a highly detailed book that starts at the beginning and ends at the end, such as it is. The technology is so open ended, it's hard to find a place to stop, so it is left up to the user's imagination and desire to take the technology explained in the book wherever they want to go. Two of the biggest things Mozilla brings to the table are DOM (the Document Object Model) and XUL (the XML User-interface Language). For anyone who already understands the basic data structure of XML, they can realize huge benefits from Mozilla's XUL interface. The book details how to use these technologies to build exceptional Web applications which can be integrated with other technologies like JavaScript?. From the most basic examples to the beginnings of large application examples, a reader can find most anything within the pages of this book. It can be used as a learning tutorial if read cover to cover. Or, with its extensive index consisting of topics, tags and assorted conventions, one could simply use this book as a reference guide. The only drawback I could find with the text is its limited scope. However, if you're not the sort of person who is going to be designing Web applications using Mozilla's tools, you would hardly be interested in this book anyway.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Surely the browser wars are over? Microsoft's Internet Exploreer won, right? Certainly, on desktops, IE is said to be on over 90%, with the rest divvied up between Netscape, Mozilla, Konqueror, Opera and sundry others. Plus, by now most browsers have the same core functionality. So on your desktop, regardless of what browser you are currently using, why switch to another type anyway? As opposed to following the upgrade path for your browser. Given all this, you might askk why we need a book on Mozilla? Game over, right? Well, Mozilla has become far more than just a browser. It is now a chassis or platform upon which to quickly develop applications. It has a library of over 1000 objects, GUI and nonGUI, that have been extensively tested. The idea is that you can then easily write your application in JavaScript, using this library. By the way, JavaScript is the only choice. You might compare Mozilla to java and its now large library, or to C++ and its Standard Template Library. The book points out repeatedly that this is open source and free. Here, free is the operative word. Because, as McFarlane is careful to note, for the typical developer, open source Mozilla is moot. If you want rapid development, you have neither the time or inclination to acquaint yourself with the source at a level that you can usefully change it. The book does not seem to say the following, but I offer it as extra guidance. If you want to compare Mozilla with a Microsoft product of similar functionality, then that is not IE. Rather, it might be Visual Studio .NET. Also, in the open source arena, another alternative to Mozilla is Eclipse, donated by IBM. Eclipse is also extensible, but where you program in Java.