×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Rashomon and Other Stories
     

Rashomon and Other Stories

3.1 7
by Ryunosuke Akutagawa, Howard Hibbet, Kojima Takashi, Howard Hibbett (Introduction)
 

See All Formats & Editions

"Clear-eyed glimpses of human behavior in the extremities of poverty, stupidity, greed, vanity… Story-telling of an unconventional sort, with most of the substance beneath the shining, enameled surface." —The New York Times Book Review

This collection of six short stories, most of which have never been translated before, includes "In a

Overview

"Clear-eyed glimpses of human behavior in the extremities of poverty, stupidity, greed, vanity… Story-telling of an unconventional sort, with most of the substance beneath the shining, enameled surface." —The New York Times Book Review

This collection of six short stories, most of which have never been translated before, includes "In a Grove", a psychologically sophisticated tale about murder, rape, and suicide; "Rashomon", the story of a thief scared into honesty by an encounter with a ghoul; and "Kesa and Morito", the story of man driven to kill someone he doesn't hate by a lover whom he doesn't love.

"There are enough Swiftian touches in Akutagawa to show his hatred of stupidity, greed, hypocrisy and the rising jingoism of the day. But Akutagawa's artistic integrity kept him from joining his contemporaries in the easy social criticism or naive introspection…What he did was question the values of his society, dramatize the complexities of human psychology, and study, with a Zen taste for paradox, the precarious balance of illusion and reality."—Howard Hibbett, from the Introduction of Rashomon and Other Stories

Classic Japanese stories include:

  • In a Grove
  • Rashomon
  • Yam Gruel
  • The Martyr
  • Kesa and Morito
  • The Dragon

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"There are enough Swiftian touches in Akutagawa to show his hatred of stupidity, greed, hypocrisy, and the rising jingoism of the day. But Akutagawa's artistic integrity kept him from joining his contemporaries in the easy social criticism or naive introspection…What he did was question the values of his society, dramatize the complexities of human psychology, and study, with a Zen taste for paradox, the balance of illusion and reality." —Howard Hibbett, professor emeritus of Japanese literature, Harvard University

"Clear-eyed glimpses of human behavior in the extremities of poverty, stupidity, greed, vanity… Story-telling of an unconventional sort, with most of the substance beneath the shining, enameled surface." —The New York Times Book Review

David Rakoff - The New York Times Book Review
“Because I was a Japanese major in college, a very nice edition of a translation of Rashomon and Other Stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa had been left for me at my bedside, to read while I was there and to take with me when I left. Thoughtful, I thought. And fitting. Even more fitting, that friend and I no longer speak, and I am sure we have very different versions as to why that is.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9784805308820
Publisher:
Tuttle Publishing
Publication date:
10/15/2007
Series:
Tuttle Classics Series
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
504,247
Product dimensions:
5.12(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Ryunosuke Akutagawa was the author of over 100 short stories. Described as one of the best-read men of his generation, he re degree in English Literature at Tokyo Imperial University and published translations by Anatole France and W. B. Yeats. Two of his short stories from this collection became the basis of the award-winning movie Rashomon by famed director Akira Kurosawa. In 1927, he committed suicide at the age of thirty-five.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Rashomon and Other Stories 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
karl karlsson More than 1 year ago
The preview didn't show any actual text from the book. It is filled with glitchy characters and formatting errors that make it unreadable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago