Raspberry Delights Cookbook: A Collection of Raspeberry Recipes

Raspberry Delights Cookbook: A Collection of Raspeberry Recipes

by Karen Jean Matsko Hood
     
 
Delicious raspberries are versatile, nutritious, and always add a special flair to any dish, whether used in cakes, pies and breads, in preserves, as a salad ingredient, in wines or brandies, or any number of other imaginative ways. Rich in vitamins A and C, they also contain ellagic acid, an anti-carcinogenic (cancer-preventing) compound. In Raspberry Delights

Overview

Delicious raspberries are versatile, nutritious, and always add a special flair to any dish, whether used in cakes, pies and breads, in preserves, as a salad ingredient, in wines or brandies, or any number of other imaginative ways. Rich in vitamins A and C, they also contain ellagic acid, an anti-carcinogenic (cancer-preventing) compound. In Raspberry Delights Cookbook, author Karen Jean Matsko Hood presents her collection of more than 270 exciting raspberry recipes that will be sure to please everyone. Inside, you will also find some fascinating reading regarding this wholesome berry's history, folklore, cultivation, and much more. With recipes using readily available ingredients, Raspberry Delights Cookbook will be a valued addition to any chef's bookshelf.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781598080995
Publisher:
Whispering Pine Press International, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2014
Pages:
326
Sales rank:
925,490
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Read an Excerpt

Info for Raspberry Delights

Raspberry History

The red raspberry is indigenous to Asia Minor and North America. Fruits were gathered from the wild by the people of Troy in the foothills of Mt. Ida around the time of Christ. Records of domestication were found in 4th century writings of Palladius, a Roman agriculturist, and seeds have been discovered at Roman forts in Britain. Therefore, the Romans are thought to have spread cultivation throughout Europe.

In Medieval Europe, wild berries were considered both medicinal and utilitarian. Their juices were used in paintings and illuminated manuscripts. During this period, only the rich partook of their tasty bounty. King Edward I (1272-1307) is recognized as the first person to call for the cultivation of berries. By the seventeenth century, British gardens were rich with berries and berry bushes. By the eighteenth century, berry cultivation practices had spread throughout Europe.

When settlers from Europe came to America, they found Native Americans already utilizing and eating berries. Due to the nomadic nature of this culture, berries were dried for preservation and ease of transportation. Settlers also brought cultivated raspberries that were native to Europe with them to the new colonies. The first commercial nursery plants were sold by William Price in 1771.

In 1761, George Washington moved to his estate in Mount Vernon where he began to cultivate berries in his extensive gardens.

By 1867 over 40 different varieties were known. After the Civil War, major production areas emerged in the regions of New York, Michigan, Oregon, Washington, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, andIndiana.

By 1880, approximately 2,000 acres were in cultivation. By 1919, production had risen to 54,000 acres. By 1948, growth had slowed to 60,000 acres.

Today, the leading producing regions for red raspberries are Washington, Oregon, and California. However, Washington accounts for nearly 60% of the U.S. production of red raspberries, at nearly 70,000,000 pounds per year.

Raspberry Banana Nut Bread

This is a moist alternative variety of the traditional banana nut bread that is great with raspberries.

Ingredients:

1 3/4 c. sifted flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. baking soda
1/3 c. butter
2/3 c. sugar
2 eggs
1 c. bananas, mashed
1 c. walnuts, chopped
1 1/2 c. raspberries

Directions:

1. Sift together flour, baking powder, soda, and salt.
2. Set aside.
3. Cream butter.
4. Gradually beat in sugar until light and fluffy.
5. Add eggs, one at a time.
6. Add flour mixture and banana alternately in three parts.
7. Stir in walnuts.
8. Gently stir in raspberries.
9. Pour into oiled 9 x 5 inch loaf pan.
10. Bake at 350 degrees F. for 50 minutes.
11. Take out of pan and set aside to cool.


Did You Know? . . . .

Did you know you should not wash the berries until you are ready to use them? That is because washing makes them more prone to spoiling.


Peach and Raspberry Cobbler

Raspberries combine with peaches to make a delicious cobbler dessert.

Ingredients:

9 peaches (about 3 lb.)
1 c. sugar
1 tsp. sugar
2 Tbs. cornstarch
2 tsp. lemon juice
1 pt. raspberries
1 1/2 c. flour
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
3/4 tsp. salt
5 Tbs. butter, chilled
2/3 c. milk

Directions:

1. Heat oven to 400 degrees F.
2. Peel peaches and slice.
3. Combine with 3/4 cup sugar, cornstarch, and lemon juice.
4. Gently stir in raspberries.
5. Transfer to 2-quart baking dish; cover with foil.
6. Bake until bubbling, about 30 minutes.
7. Meanwhile, combine 1/4 cup sugar, flour, baking powder, and salt.
8. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse meal.
9. Stir milk into flour mixture until ingredients just hold together.
10. Drop 8 heaping spoonfuls of dough onto hot fruit.
11. Sprinkle remaining sugar on dough.
12. Bake, uncovered, until the biscuits have browned, about 25 minutes.
13. Serve warm right out of the oven.

Did You Know? . . . .

Did you know there are over 200 species of raspberries, and they can be grown from the Arctic to the equator? They are red, yellow, orange, purple, or black, and can be harvested from early summer through fall.


Raspberry Cream Cheese Spread

This is an easy-to-make spread on muffins or bagels. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

4 oz. cream cheese, softened
1 c. raspberries
2-3 Tbs. powdered sugar

Directions:

1. Blend powdered sugar and cream cheese.
2. Mix in raspberries.
3. Serve on bagels or English muffins.

Meet the Author

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >