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Raspberry Pi User Guide
     

Raspberry Pi User Guide

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by Eben Upton, Gareth Halfacree
 

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Learn the Raspberry Pi 3 from the experts!

Raspberry Pi User Guide, 4th Edition is the "unofficial official" guide to everything Raspberry Pi 3. Written by the Pi's creator and a leading Pi guru, this book goes straight to the source to bring you the ultimate Raspberry Pi 3 manual. This new fourth edition has been updated to cover the Raspberry Pi 3

Overview

Learn the Raspberry Pi 3 from the experts!

Raspberry Pi User Guide, 4th Edition is the "unofficial official" guide to everything Raspberry Pi 3. Written by the Pi's creator and a leading Pi guru, this book goes straight to the source to bring you the ultimate Raspberry Pi 3 manual. This new fourth edition has been updated to cover the Raspberry Pi 3 board and software, with detailed discussion on its wide array of configurations, languages, and applications. You'll learn how to take full advantage of the mighty Pi's full capabilities, and then expand those capabilities even more with add-on technologies. You'll write productivity and multimedia programs, and learn flexible programming languages that allow you to shape your Raspberry Pi into whatever you want it to be. If you're ready to jump right in, this book gets you started with clear, step-by-step instruction from software installation to system customization.

The Raspberry Pi's tremendous popularity has spawned an entire industry of add-ons, parts, hacks, ideas, and inventions. The movement is growing, and pushing the boundaries of possibility along with it—are you ready to be a part of it? This book is your ideal companion for claiming your piece of the Pi.

  • Get all set up with software, and connect to other devices
  • Understand Linux System Admin nomenclature and conventions
  • Write your own programs using Python and Scratch
  • Extend the Pi's capabilities with add-ons like Wi-Fi dongles, a touch screen, and more

The credit-card sized Raspberry Pi has become a global phenomenon. Created by the Raspberry Pi Foundation to get kids interested in programming, this tiny computer kick-started a movement of tinkerers, thinkers, experimenters, and inventors. Where will your Raspberry Pi 3 take you? The Raspberry Pi User Guide, 3rd Edition is your ultimate roadmap to discovery.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118921661
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
11/03/2014
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Eben Upton is a founder of the Raspberry Pi Foundation and serves as the CEO of Raspberry Pi (Trading), its commercial arm. In an earlier life he founded two mobile games companies and was Director of Studies for Computer Science at St John’s College, Cambridge. He holds a BA, a PhD and an MBA from the University of Cambridge.

Gareth Halfacree is a freelance technology journalist and the co-author of the Raspberry Pi User Guide alongside project co-founder Eben Upton. Gareth can often be seen reviewing, documenting or even contributing to projects, including GNU/Linux, LibreOffice, Fritzing and Arduino.

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Raspberry Pi User Guide 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
FRINGEINDEPENEDENTREVIEW More than 1 year ago
Are you a new Pi user or curious hacker? If you are, this book is for you. Authors Eben Upton and Gareth Halfacree, have done an outstanding job of writing a 3rd edition of a book that provides an introduction to the world of Raspberry Pi. Authors Upton and Halfacree, begin by showing you how to connect your Raspberry Pi to a display, keyboard and mouse; install an operating system; and, jump straight into using the Pi. Next, the authors present a quick primer on how to use the operating system. In addition, they look at some of the most common reasons for the Pi to misbehave and how to fix them. The authors also concentrate on whether you know that your network doesn’t have a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol server (a system that tells the Pi and other devices on the network how they should connect) or if you want to use a USB wireless adapter with the Pi. Then, they continue by discussing why although raspi-config is designed to be safe, some settings (in particular, the overclock option) can leave your Raspberry Pi unable to boot. The authors then offer a word of warning: Changing the settings on config.txt and cmdline.txt from their defaults, can result in a Pi that doesn’t boot until the files are reverted, in the best case; and, that can physically damage the system, in the worst case. Next, they cover the most popular tasks for a Pi: That of a home theater PC, or HTPC. In addition, the authors show you how the Pi can be used as a day-to-day machine for office and school work, while not harming its usability as a platform for programming and experimentation, by using either locally installed applications or cloud-based services. They also explain why that in order to ensure a Web server’s maximum performance, you must switch the Pi’s memory partitioning to reserve just 16MB or 32MB for the GPU; and, not run a graphical user interface at the same time. Then, the authors discuss how the Raspberry Pi Foundation is working to get the Pi device adopted as an educational tool for all ages by using Scratch. Next, they cover the high-level language Python code; and, how it provides the Pi with commands in a manner that is quick to learn and easy to follow. The authors continue by looking at Minecraft: Which is now available for the Raspberry Pi, and brings with it educational elements that let interested parties learn through play. They then stress that before you can get started building circuits to use with the Pi’s GPIO port, you need some additional equipment and an understanding about some of the language surrounding the world of electronics. Next, the authors show you where the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO port is located: On the top-left of the printed circuit board, labeled P1. In addition, they cover the Raspberry Pi Camera Module: Which is the most compact way of adding the ability to record still images and video to your project. Finally, the authors take a peek at the add-on boards, which simply provide easier access to the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins. This excellent book explores a number of things you can do with your Raspberry Pi, from controlling hardware with Python, to using its as a media center, setting up camera projects, or building games in Scratch. Also, this great book shows how the Raspberry Pi exposes GPIO, so that you can get to work right away.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
lots of command to get started learning Linux in here, tell you step by step how to do them and setup a lot of other thing in Linux as well as the Raspberry Pi
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kills the bager
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
YAY